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Tonite Let's All Make Love in London (1967)

Peter Whitehead's disjointed Swinging London documentary, subtitled "A Pop Concerto," comprises a number of different "movements," each depicting a different theme underscored by music: A ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Alan Aldridge ...
Himself (segment "Painting Pop")
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Herself (segment "Movie Stars")
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Himself (segment "Painting Pop")
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Himself (segment "It's All Pop Music")
Edna O'Brien ...
Herself (segment "Dollygirls")
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Themselves (as The Pink Floyd)
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Herself (segment "Protest")
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Storyline

Peter Whitehead's disjointed Swinging London documentary, subtitled "A Pop Concerto," comprises a number of different "movements," each depicting a different theme underscored by music: A early version of Pink Floyd's "Interstellar Overdrive" plays behind some arty nightclub scenes, while Chris Farlowe's rendition of the Rolling Stones' "Out of Time" accompanies a young woman's description of London nightlife and the vacuousness of her own existence. In another segment, the Marquess of Kensington (Robert Wace) croons the nostalgic "Changing of the Guard" to shots of Buckingham Palace's changing of the guard, and recording act Vashti are seen at work in the studio. Sandwiched between are clips of Mick Jagger (discussing revolution), Andrew Loog Oldham (discussing his future) - and Julie Christie, Michael Caine, Lee Marvin, and novelist Edna O'Brien (each discussing sex). The best part is footage of the riot that interrupted the Stones' 1966 Royal Albert Hall concert Written by alfiehitchie

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Documentary | Music

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Release Date:

15 September 2001 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

London, Frühjahr 67  »

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1.37 : 1
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Connections

Referenced in The Benefit of the Doubt (1967) See more »

Soundtracks

Changing Of The Guard
Written by Charles Mills and Mike Leander
Performed by Marquis Of Kensington
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User Reviews

A time-capsule from the London Psychedelic Underground
25 October 2003 | by (Bermuda) – See all my reviews



For die-hard fans of Pink Floyd only. This is a history-lesson into the psychedelic London underground of the mid-60's, where light-shows, "Happenings", Beat-poetry, and spacey music were all the rage. This film is mainly several pieces of concert-footage of Pink Floyd in its original incarnation, when Syd Barret was still in the band, prior to him loosing his marbles and being replaced by David Gilmour. You see Syd and the band playing some long sets of "Interstellar Overdrive" on stage under strobe-lights, a piece of music that true fans love and which the uninitiated often find meandering and boring due to the modern short-attention span. This is Space-Rock, it ain't Britney Spears.

You get to hear Allen Ginsburg recite poetry over images of the London night-life. You see John Lennon attending one of Yoko Ono's famous performance-art pieces, prior to them having met. You see Eric Burdon walking around. It's basically a slice-of-life in the heart of what's now called "the Swinging 60's". View it, if you can find it, for the history, if nothing else. For Floyd fans it's one of very few opportunities to see Syd Barret playing with the band, which is reason enough to seek it out.


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