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The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967)

 -  Crime | Drama | History  -  30 June 1967 (USA)
6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 2,097 users  
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Chicago February 14th 1929. Al Capone finally establishes himself as the city's boss of organised crime. In a north-side garage his hoods, dressed as policemen, surprise and mow down with ... See full summary »

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Title: The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Jean Hale ...
Myrtle
Clint Ritchie ...
Frank Silvera ...
Nick Sorello
Joseph Campanella ...
Albert Wienshank
Richard Bakalyan ...
John Scalise
...
Frank Gusenberg
...
Johnny May
...
Kurt Kreuger ...
James Clark
...
...
Jake 'Greasy Thumb' Guzik (as Joseph Turkel)
Milton Frome ...
Adam Heyer
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Storyline

Chicago February 14th 1929. Al Capone finally establishes himself as the city's boss of organised crime. In a north-side garage his hoods, dressed as policemen, surprise and mow down with machine-guns the key members of Bugs Moran's rival gang. The film traces the history of the incident, and the lives affected and in some cases ended by it. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | History

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 June 1967 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le massacre de la Saint-Valentin  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

At the beginning of the movie when Peter Gusenberg (George Segal) asks the barkeep where he's getting his beer from, the barkeep answers, "A fellow named Slausen", to which Gusenberg replies, "Slausen? The only Slausen I know works for Caponi, Al Caponi." Believe it or not, Gusenberg's pronunciation of Al Capone's name is in fact a source of debate amongst historians. Though he's known as "Capone" with an "E", early arrest sheets and Chicago Tribune articles listed Capone's name as "Caponi" with an "I". However, the Chicago Tribune was known at the time for their blatant spelling errors (like "clew" for "clue") and may be responsible for this misconception of Capone's name. See more »

Goofs

In the scene where Jack McGurn is showing the killers how to get to the Clark Street garage from the Wood street location, McGurn's spoken directions are correct but while he is saying "east on Webster" his finger is traveling north on Wood Street. Then while he is saying "south on Clark" his finger is traveling east on Webster. See more »

Quotes

Adam Heyer: Hello, boys. Something I can do for you?
Gangster dressed as a cop: Yes, you can shut up!
See more »

Connections

Featured in Bullets Over Hollywood (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bears interesting comparison with THE GODFATHER.
15 June 2000 | by (dublin, ireland) – See all my reviews

It's incredible to think that this film, Roger Corman's major studio debut, and THE GODFATHER (made by Corman alumnus Coppola) were made within five years of each other. They could be decades apart, in look, in sensibility, in impact. Whereas GODFATHER gropes for a rich, mythic timelessness, MASSACRE seems brittle, thin, a mere pastiche of, variously, 30s Warners gangster films, 40s B-movies, or Corman's own early work. Whereas Coppola's characters have passed into popular culture, Corman's gangsters are thinly characterised, theatrical, parodic; whereas GODFATHER's plot is slow-burning, tense, silent, punctuated with shocking shards of tangible violence, MASSACRE is almost cartoon-like in its relentless gunfire, which, because it's not rooted in character, does not have as traumatic an effect.

Some of us, however, might recoil a little from the major film's more questionable posturing, and MASSACRE has many excellencies. Most immediately pleasurable is the plot, mathematically simple, as Corman narrates the titular bloodbath like a theorem, showing A (Capone) meeting B (Moran) to create C (the massacre). QED. Nothing is allowed interfere with this beautiful simplicity - every scene, every character, every action refers to this theorem alone. Even scenes which seem to illustrate character (eg Peter Gusenberg and Myrtle) only do so to 'explain' why one side got the better of another.

This quality extends to the film as a whole, which is a series of repetitions and mirroring scenes. Another pleasure is the voiceover, which again transforms a conventional narrative about real people into abstract formalism. Like a voice of God, it intrudes without warning, frequently, mixing bald factual details about all the players (eg Such and such, born 1893 in such a place, suspected gun-runner, killer etc., will die on 3 May 1957 of heart failure) with speculation. Before any character has even begun their parts in the film, their life stories are known to us. This robs them of everything that makes us human - motivation, hope, action. Sartre said we are what we do. Not here. Robbed of human characteristics, they become mere ciphers, playing out their inevitable fates, and denying the viewer the kind of emotional empathy that Coppola will dubiously over-indulge in.

Despite the (relatively) high budget, production values do nothing to make the film more realistic. Indeed, the uniformity of colour (predominantly grey), the repetition of scenes and places, the reduction of sequences to sheer functionality, makes the film increasingly artificial. The theatricality of the acting adds to this, with Robards especially hamming away to amusingly grand effect, but theatricality is embedded too, as narratively crucial scenes become sites for rhetoric, oratory, dramatic performance, an actor declaiming to an enrapt public, hanging (for dear life) to his every word.

Add to all this Corman's stunning, playful direction, confident and fluid, making interiors and objects live, fixing characters in their place. The violent scenes are expertly choreographed, if they aren't disturbing, their formal excellence is undiminished. All this formalism is not an empty, academic exercise. By revealing the phoniness of his subject matter, Corman reveals the processes of myth-making that, especially through the cinema, curiously glamourised an era, when America was in thrall to a number of violent fascists.

Corman is not seriously moralistic, he is cheerfully aware of human nature's strange pulls - he shows how the need for violence and sensation in cinema is close to the fascistic, but also undeniable. It is a trap Coppola doesn't always avoid. The score, which makes ragtime eerily modernist, is astounding, while Corman reveals, as in TALES OF TERROR, that he has a canny sense of the domestic's comic violence - the Pete/Myrtle scene is a hilarious-troubling classic.


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