The Night of the Generals (1967) - News Poster

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Review: "Is Paris Burning?", 50th Anniversary 2-cd Set From Tadlow

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison

Is Paris Burning? Composed by Maurice Jarre, The 50th Anniversary Recording of the Complete Score. A Special Collectors 2 CD Edition featuring a brand new recording by The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Conducted by Nic Raine. Released by Tadlow Music, Price: £16.95 TADLOW023, Date: August 25th 2016 Anniversary of the Liberation of Paris.

It’s always exciting to receive the latest release from Tadlow music. When award winning producer James Fitzpatrick and respected conductor Nic Raine join forces and combine their talents, you know the result is always going to be good. Maurice Jarre’s music is, of course, nothing new to the long standing partnership. Together in recent years, they have overseen triumphant new recordings of Jarre’s Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Villa Rides (1968).

Is Paris Burning? (1966) is their latest collaboration and features the complete 69 minute film score including previously unrecorded cues. A great deal of Jarre’s patriotic score is heavily militaristic,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Five Miles to Midnight | Blu-ray Review

Decidedly weird but not altogether enthralling is the 1962 title Five Miles to Midnight, a melodramatic thriller with noir elements and one of the last films by the accomplished Anatole Litvak (who would only direct two more features after, including The Night of the Generals and the currently unavailable 1970 version of The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun).

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Evil (1978)

A haunted house film is a tough sell. No masked stalker, no creatures that eviscerate and certainly no zombies lurching down those shadowed halls. A single setting, a dark secret, a group of people terrified by something is usually your standard template, and even the best haunted house flick doth not stray from the formula. So the trick is to convince the viewers once you get them inside – something that the low on budget, high on conviction, and seldom talked about The Evil (1978) accomplishes admirably.

Barely distributed in May of ‘78 by Roger Corman’s New World Pictures, The Evil was made for $700,000 Us and came and went very quickly. The filmmakers complained about the paltry distribution, but I’m sure Corman turned a profit somewhere down the line – he usually did. So from the modest budget, to the generic sounding title (why not just call it Horror Movie?) to the not exactly topical sub genre,
See full article at DailyDead »

Omar Sharif dies aged 83

  • ScreenDaily
Omar Sharif dies aged 83
Actor best known for roles in Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago.

Actor Omar Sharif has died aged 83. The Egypt-born actor, who had stepped away from acting since being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, died following a heart attack this afternoon in a hospital in Cairo.

Sharif won two Golden Globes and an Oscar nomination for his role as Sherif Ali in David Lean’s 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia.

He won a further Golden Globe three years later for Doctor Zhivago.

Sharif was born Michel Demetri Chalhoub in Alexandria on April 10, 1932, and studied acting at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London.

Sharif began his acting career in 1953 with a role in romantic drama Sira` Fi al-Wadi before appearing in more than 20 Egyptian productions, including Ayyamna el helwa with singer Abdel Halim Hafez, La anam (1958), Sayedat el kasr (1959) and Anna Karenina adaptation Nahr el hub (1961). He also starred with his wife, Egyptian actress
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Omar Sharif Dead At Age 83; Starred In "Lawrence Of Arabia" And "Doctor Zhivago"

  • CinemaRetro
Omar Sharif, the Egyptian actor who broke through barriers to become a major international star, has died in Cairo from a heart attack at age 83. In recent months, he had been battling the onset of Alzheimer's Disease. Sharif and Peter O'Toole were virtual unknowns when they were cast as the leads by director David Lean in his 1962 masterpiece "Lawrence of Arabia". Both received Oscar nominations for the film and went on to become two of the biggest stars to emerge in the 1960s. Sharif reunited with Lean for another blockbuster, the 1965 production of "Doctor Zhivago" in which Sharif played the title role. He also co-starred with Barbra Streisand in her Oscar-winning 1968 film "Funny Girl" and appeared with her in the 1975 sequel "Funny Lady". Other prominent films Sharif appeared in during the 1960s include Samuel Bronston's ill-fated but underrated "The Fall of the Roman Empire", "Behold a Pale Horse", the
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Omar Sharif 1932-2015: Lawrence of Arabia star's incredible career in pictures

Omar Sharif 1932-2015: Lawrence of Arabia star's incredible career in pictures
Omar Sharif, star of Doctor Zhivago and Lawrence of Arabia, has passed away at the age of 83.

The Egyptian-born actor rose to fame in the '60s thanks to his roles in director David Lean's sweeping epics and continued to work across TV and film for a further five decades. Digital Spy takes a look back at some of Sharif's greatest roles below.

David Lean cast Sharif as Arab revolutionary Sherif Ali in 1962's Lawrence of Arabia - the film was his English language debut and earned him an Oscar nomination.

Sharif reunited with Lawrence director David Lean to take on the lead role in Doctor Zhivago in 1965.

World War II drama The Night of the Generals (1967) saw Sharif star alongside Peter O'Toole once more, with Donald Pleasence, Tom Courtenay and Christopher Plummer in the supporting cast."

Sharif starred opposite Barbra Streisand in 1968's Funny Girl, playing a smooth gambler to her Vaudeville performer.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Omar Sharif, ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and ‘Dr. Zhivago’ Star, Dies at 83

Omar Sharif, ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and ‘Dr. Zhivago’ Star, Dies at 83
Omar Sharif, the dashing, Egyptian-born actor who was one of the biggest movie stars in the world in the 1960s, with memorable roles in “Dr. Zhivago,” “Lawrence of Arabia” and “Funny Girl,” has died. He was 83.

Sharif suffered a heart attack on Friday afternoon in a hospital in Cairo, his agent said.

It was announced in May that he had Alzheimer’s disease.

With the global success of David Lean’s “Lawrence of Arabia,” starring Peter O’Toole, in 1962, Sharif became the first Arab actor to achieve worldwide fame, thanks to his charismatic presence in the epic film — and the Oscar nomination he drew because of it.

In its wake he very quickly became a busy Hollywood actor: Sharif made three films in 1964, including “Behold a Pale Horse” and “The Yellow Rolls Royce,” and three in 1965, including his first lead role in an English-language production, as the title character in Lean’s “Dr.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

R.I.P. Omar Sharif

Legendary Egyptian-born, British trained actor Omar Sharif has died at the age of 83.

Though studying maths and physics at University, and working in the family business of precious woods, Sharif felt the lure of performing and ended up appearing in more than twenty productions in Egypt from 1953.

His big international break came in 1962 when he joined David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" and scored both a Golden Globe award and an Oscar nomination for his work as Sherif Ali Ben El Kharish. He went on to roles in various major movies including "Doctor Zhivago," "Funny Girl," "Behold a Pale Horse," "Che!," "Top Secret," "Hidalgo," "The Fall of the Roman Empire ," "The Pink Panther Strikes Again," "The Mysterious Island," "The Last Valley," "The Baltimore Bullet," "Mayerling," "The Night of the Generals," "Genghis Khan," "Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna," "One Night with the King " and "Monsieur Ibrahim".

Surprisingly he also became famous
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Off The Shelf – Episode 51 – New Releases For Tuesday, May 26th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of May 26th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

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Episode Links & Notes

News

Masters Of Cinema & Eureka in August: Cruel Story Of Youth, Medium Cool, the Town That Dreaded Sundown

Screen Archives Entertainment have some new and exclusive Code Red Blu-ray titles, available now. Guy Magar’s Retribution, Tobe Hooper’s Spontaneous Combustion and Shakma.

Twilight Time new releases for June will go live for pre-order Wednesday, May 27the st 4 Pm Eastern: Absolute Beginners (1986), State Of Grace (1990) , Mississippi Mermaid (1969), The Young Lions (1958) , The Night Of The Generals (1967) the approximate street date is June 9th.

New Releases

Ballet 422 Cannibal Ferox The Confession Da Sweet Blood of Jesus Double Indemnity Empire Of The Ants / Jaws Of Satan
See full article at CriterionCast »

Twilight Time Brings One of the Best American Films of the ’70s to Blu-ray

Specialty Blu-ray label Twilight Time continues to show their deep love for film with a continually growing and constantly eclectic selection of releases. The next few months will see Blu-ray titles as varied as To Sir With Love, U-Turn, The Night of the Generals and Zardoz. There were five titles on last month’s slate (released on 1/20) including a great American underdog tale in Breaking Away, an Indian biopic of uprising and war with Bandit Queen, Francois Truffaut’s female-driven revenge film The Bride Wore Black, Woody Allen’s surreal ode to the cinema in The Purple Rose of Cairo and a 30th Anniversary release of Fright Night. That last title — the only one not covered below — was actually released by the label once before with a far slimmer selection of special features. It immediately became a collector’s item, and now, barely three weeks after its re-release, this anniversary edition is already fetching ridiculous sums from
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

R.I.P. Peter O'Toole (1932 - 2013)

Screen legend Peter O'Toole has passed away today aged 81 after battling a long illness, his agent has revealed. The star, who received an honorary Oscar in 2003, enjoyed a career that spanned seven decades and saw him receiving eight Academy Award nominations for Best Actor (making him the most-nominated actor never to win the Oscar), including that of adventurer T.E. Lawrence in David Lean's 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia.

Born in 1932, O'Toole began his acting career treading the boards and made his TV debut in the 1950s before making the leap to the big screen with a small role in 1959's The Day They Robbed the Bank of England. After his breakthrough role in Lawrence of Arabia, he would earn further Oscar nominations for Becket (1964), The Lion in Winter (1968), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969|), The Ruling Class (1972), The Stunt Man (1980), My Favourite Year (1982) and Venus (2006), as well as gaining a reputation for his hard-drinking,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Peter O’Toole: An Enduring and Endearing Star Against All Odds

Peter O’Toole: An Enduring and Endearing Star Against All Odds
That Peter O’Toole made it to the ripe old age of 81 doubtless surprised no one more than O’Toole himself.

“The common denominator of all my friends is that they’re dead,” he joked mordantly in an interview for the 2008 book “Hellraisers,” which chronicled O’Toole’s career alongside those of his contemporaries Richard Burton, Richard Harris and Oliver Reed. They represented a generation of British actors whose titanic screen performances were rivaled by their legendary off-screen drinking, carousing and other wicked ways, all of them dead well before their time.

See Also: Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ star was 81

In fact, O’Toole had nearly beaten them all to the punch when, in 1975, at only 43, an emergency stomach surgery revealed that his digestive system had been so eroded by alcohol that even the slightest amount more could prove fatal. So O’Toole sobered up in life,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eight-Time Best Actor Academy Award Nominee O'Toole Dead at 81

Peter O’Toole: ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ actor, eight-time Oscar nominee dead at 81 (photo: Peter O’Toole as T.E. Lawrence in David Lean’s ‘Lawrence of Arabia’) Stage, film, and television actor Peter O’Toole, an eight-time Best Actor Academy Award nominee best remembered for his performance as T.E. Lawrence in David Lean’s epic blockbuster Lawrence of Arabia, died on Saturday, December 14, 2013, at a London hospital following "a long illness." Peter O’Toole was 81. The Irish-born O’Toole (on August 2, 1932, in Connemara, County Galway) began his film career with three supporting roles in 1960 releases: Robert Stevenson’s Disney version of Kidnapped; John Guillermin’s The Day They Robbed the Bank of England; and Nicholas Ray’s The Savage Innocents, starring Anthony Quinn as an Inuit man accused of murder. Two years later, O’Toole became a star following the release of Lawrence of Arabia, which grossed an astounding $44.82 million in North America back in 1962 (approx.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

R.I.P. Peter O’Toole

With with great sadness we report the news of legendary British actor Peter O’Toole’s passing at the age of 81. Born in Ireland and brought up in Leeds, the stage and screen thespian’s almost 60 year career included masterpieces such as David Lean’s Lawrence Of Arabia, Anatole Litvak’s The Night Of The Generals and Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor. He was nominated for eight Academy Awards (the most recent in 2007s Venus) but unfortunately didn’t walk away with any. However, he was the recipient of an honorary Oscar in 2003.

Incredibly, O’Toole overcame stomach cancer in the late 1970′s despite being a well-known hard-drinking hell raiser alongside pals Richard Harris, Richard Burton and Oliver Reed. He died in Wellington hospital, London on Saturday after battling a long illness.

He recently came out of for a retirement to take a role in the upcoming period drama Katherine Of Alexandria.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81
Irish-born stage and screen actor Peter O’Toole, who became an international star in the title role of David Lean’s Oscar-winning epic “Lawrence of Arabia,” died on Saturday at age 81.

“His family are very appreciative and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being expressed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time,” his daughter Katherine O’Toole said in a statement on Sunday. “Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts.”

O’Toole’s agent, Steve Kenis, said O’Toole was “one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field.”

Showbiz execs, directors and fellow actors have paid tribute to their friend.

Amanda Berry, CEO of BAFTA, said: “His was an outstanding career and he leaves us with cinematic magic in his many films. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”

Leslie Phillips, who played alongside
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81

Peter O’Toole Dies; ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Star Was 81
Irish-born stage and screen actor Peter O’Toole, who became an international star in the title role of David Lean’s Oscar-winning epic “Lawrence of Arabia,” died on Saturday at age 81.

“His family are very appreciative and completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of real love and affection being expressed towards him, and to us, during this unhappy time,” his daughter Katherine O’Toole said in a statement on Sunday. “Thank you all, from the bottom of our hearts.”

O’Toole’s agent, Steve Kenis, said O’Toole was “one of a kind in the very best sense and a giant in his field.”

Showbiz execs, directors and fellow actors have paid tribute to their friend.

Amanda Berry, CEO of BAFTA, said: “His was an outstanding career and he leaves us with cinematic magic in his many films. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”

Leslie Phillips, who played alongside
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Le Silence de la Mer (1949) review

As part of the war movie genre, the heroic exploits of the Resistance have been a popular form of cinematic entertainment since the end of World War Two. The bane of the invading German forces, the Resistance always represented the ordinary man picking up arms against the dreaded Hun to defend their country. Whether it was booby-trapping panzers or smuggling escaped POWs and Jewish refugees to safety, many films emphasized their heroism to great effect. Exploits of the Greek, Norwegian and French Resistance have been put to good use in The Guns of Navarone (1961), 633 Squadron (1964) and The Night of the Generals (1967).

As great as these films were, the exploits of the Resistance has been pretty much romanticized and even parodied (for those who remember ‘Allo ‘Allo!). The reality was very different. They were ruthless killers who took no prisoners and treated those who had in any way collaborated with the enemy with cold-blooded hostility.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

"Taxi Driver" is Indeed Talkin' to You and More New DVDs

  • IFC
A look at what's new on DVD and Blu-ray today:

"Taxi Driver" (1976)

Directed by Martin Scorsese

Released by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

One can read about the extensive restoration of what many consider to be Martin Scorsese's finest film at The Digital Bits, but if you're a film fan, you might not need convincing to pick up the latest edition of the film about the disillusioned cabbie, which includes all the special features from the previous DVDs of the film (a feature-length making of doc, a score of shorter featurettes) while adding the commentary track between Scorsese and writer Paul Schrader that originally appeared on the 1986 Criterion laser disc. All in all, it's the definitive edition that the film deserves.

"Casino Jack" (2010)

Directed by George Hickenlooper

Released by Fox Home Entertainment

Even at the height of his powers, disgraced Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff might not have been able to
See full article at IFC »

Blu-Ray Monday: April 5th, 2011

Your Weekly Source for Blu-Ray and DVD Release News Blu-Ray for Tuesday, April 5th, 2011 Steven Spielberg’s A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) An early Al Pacino in …And Justice For All (1979) Dudley Moore is a happy drunk in Arthur/Arthur 2: On The Rocks (1981/1988) Cute pork for kids… Babe (1995) Another dose of the villainous Mark Hamill in Batman: Return Of The Joker (2000) Forgotten good rom-com with Johnny Depp… Benny & Joon (1993) From the late George Hickenlooper, Kevin Spacey is Casino Jack (2010) Shocking dolphin documentary The Cove (2009) Kevin Kline & Ashley Judd star in De-lovely (2004) Fiddler On The Roof: 40th Anniversary Edition, Blu-Ray/DVD Combo (1971) Jim Carrey & Ewan McGregor star in I Love You Phillip Morris (2010) Rose McGoawn stars in the dark high school comedy Jawbreaker (1999) Ryan Gosling stars in Lars And The Real Girl (2007) Robert DeNiro & Ben Stiller star in Little Fockers (2010) Romantic comedy, Shakespeare-style with Much Ado About Nothing (1993) Julia Roberts
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Secret in Their Eyes | Film review

This Oscar-winning Argentinian thriller packs emotional punch and a dazzlingly virtuosic narrative

There is usually, and often with justification, serious criticism of the movie voted by the American Film Academy to receive its Oscar for best film in a foreign language. It happened again this year when the international critics' anointed contenders – Michael Haneke's The White Ribbon and Jacques Audiard's A Prophet – were ignored in favour of Juan José Campanella's The Secret in Their Eyes. Well, Haneke's picture is certainly more original and Audiard's altogether harsher, but Campanella's Argentinian thriller is a film of subtlety, distinction and depth that in most other years would have made it appear a very worthy recipient. Moreover, it seems an apt choice to mark what Sight & Sound celebrates on the front page of its September edition as "The Rise and Rise of Latin American Cinema" over the past decade.

The film's
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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