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Carry On... Follow That Camel (1967) Poster

Trivia

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For most of the filming Jim Dale and Peter Butterworth were not speaking to one another, even though they had the majority of scenes together.
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The camel used in the film came from Chessington Zoo. Called Sheena the Camel, it had never walked on sand before and corrugated material covered with sand had to be placed on the floor.
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Phil Silvers had short-term memory loss during the making of the film and had to have boards placed behind the camera so he could his lines. Kenneth Williams publicly rebuked him both on-set and in his personal diaries for this.
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Filming of the Sahara Desert scenes took place on Camber Sands; ironically, filming was actually halted at one point because there was snow on the sands.
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Phil Silvers replaced Sidney James in the role of Sgt. Nocker, which had been originally written for James; it turned out that James could not do the film due to commitments on George and the Dragon (1966). About two weeks into filming that picture James suffered a mild heart attack.
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This the second "Carry On" film produced by Rank, and like Carry On... Don't Lose Your Head (1966), it was released without the "Carry On" prefix. Apparently this was done for legal reasons, as Rank had just changed distributors, but the "Carry On" prefix was able to be used again starting with the next film in the series.
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Charles Hawtrey wanted to play the role of Bo West, but producer Peter Rogers refused; it was eventually played by fellow "Carry On" regular Jim Dale.
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Woody Allen was considered for the role of Sgt. Nocker after it was apparent that Sidney James could not do the film. The part in the end was cast with Phil Silvers.
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The horse used in the desert scenes would not gallop, only canter. The producer sped up the film in order to show the horse galloping.
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Phil Silvers was paid a great deal more than any other cast member, which provoked a great deal of animosity among the regular Carry On team.
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Fourteenth film in the "Carry On" franchise.
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Bernard Bresslaw plays a character called Abdul Abulbul. This is a reference to a popular British drinking song (with unprintable lyrics) called Ivan Skavinsky Skavar, in which the eponymous young Russian engages in a sexual duel with the wily Turk Abdul Abulbul Emir.
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The location filming took three weeks, the longest in Carry On history.
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Kenneth Williams and Jim Dale went to meet Phil Silvers in his hotel before filming started.
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Phil Silvers kept losing his contact lenses in the sands, necessitating cast and crew to help him look for them.
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Debut "Carry On" movie for both actress Anita Harris and actor Julian Holloway.
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During the desert food scene most of the food went bad after three days of filming and the rest had to be sprayed with a preservative.
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The nickname of Bertram Oliphant West (Jim Dale) was "Bo" as in "Bo West-- a spoof of and a rhyme with the name of "Beau Geste", the famous Foreign Legion character.
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This picture is the only ever "Carry On" movie to be top first-billed and headlined by an American actor [Phil Silvers].
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Third of four "Carry On" appearances of Angela Douglas.
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Some of the film's literal English-language translations of its foreign language titles were "Carry On in the Legion" (USA), "In the Desert, No Water Flows" (West Germany) and "Carry On with the Foreign Legion" (Hungary).
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The name of the desert fortress was "Fort Soixante-neuf", a double-entendre as this is French for "69"
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The first time Bo West (Jim Dale) is seen riding on the camel, the butler refers to is as "Cleo". This is a reference to the film Carry on Cleo (1964) in which Dale also starred.
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Some of the elaborate town sets were reused the year after in the production of Carry On... Up the Khyber (1968).
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Shooting had to be halted several times because there was snow on the sands.
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Some horses couldn't gallop, so footage had to be sped up in post-production.
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Jim Dale was bitten by the camel and Peter Rogers hit it with a prop as a result.
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While buried in the sand, Jim Dale and Peter Butterworth had to be wrapped in blankets and given brandy to keep the cold out.
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The character named "Corktip" is a parody of "Cigarette" in Under Two Flags (1936), a movie about the French Foreign Legion in the Sahara desert. The name refers to cigarettes, such as the Craven A brand, which had a cork tip.
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The film takes place in England and Sidi Bel Abbès, Algeria in 1906.
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The camel was on loan from Chessington Zoo, but had never walked on sand before, so she had to be trained to do so.
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The song used by Bo and the others to trick Abdul into thinking there are reinforcements coming is "Durch die grüne Heide", a marching song used by the German Army during World War II.
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Title card: "England 1906".
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If the scene where Bo West (Jim Dale) drops the rifle on Commandant Burger's (Kenneth Williams) foot, Dale actually did accidentally drop the rifle onto Williams' foot instead of onto the sand. It was so heavy it cut the boot leather. Williams' painful reaction was real, and he can be seen limping in several subsequent scenes. Dale insisted it was accidental but Williams wrote in his autobiography that he was sure it was deliberate.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

In the script, the final scene where the face of the baby is shown revealed Phil Silvers to be the face of the baby. However, the finished scene shows Kenneth Williams as the baby's face.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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