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The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) More at IMDbPro »Dance of the Vampires (original title)

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12 items from 2016

Interview: Cassandra Peterson Celebrates 35 Years of Elvira with New Book Elvira, Mistress Of The Dark

3 October 2016 4:23 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Cassandra Peterson is celebrating 35 years of Elvira in a big way. October 5th sees the release of Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, a coffee-table-style book from Tweeterhead that includes photos and sketches from her career, including a significant number of never-before-seen images.

Ahead of the book's release, I had a chance to catch up with Cassandra to talk about how this project came together, a photo that foretold her "Queen of Halloween" status at an early age, and much more:

I know that you've worked with Tweeterhead on those wonderful Elvira statues, and they are known more for their maquettes. How did developing a book with them come about?

Cassandra Peterson: Chad [Colebank], who runs Tweeterhead, has done my various maquettes, which have been amazingly good and my favorite so far. I talked to him about how I was thinking about doing a coffee-table book. Chad is just such a go-getter, »

- Jonathan James

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Valley of the Dolls

27 September 2016 1:36 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

High camp or just plain trash? A cultural-cinematic swamp in perfectly rotten taste, this adaptation of Jacqueline Susann's supermarket 'dirty book' seeks out tawdry sleaze like no American movie had before. Junk beyond belief, and great entertainment if you're in a sick frame of mind. Valley of the Dolls Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 835 1967 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 123 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Barbara Parkins, Patty Duke, Paul Burke, Sharon Tate, Susan Hayward, Tony Scotti, Martin Milner, Charles Drake, Alexander Davion, Lee Grant, Naomi Stevens, Robert H. Harris, Jacqueline Susann, Robert Viharo, Joey Bishop, George Jessel, Dionne Warwick, Sherry Alberoni, Margaret Whiting, Richard Angarola, Richard Dreyfuss, Marvin Hamlisch, Judith Lowry. Cinematography William H. Daniels Film Editor Dorothy Spencer Conductor / Music Adaptor John Williams Written by Helen Deutsch, Dorothy Kingsley Jacqueline Susann Produced by Mark Robson, David Weisbart Directed by Mark Robson

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I »

- Glenn Erickson

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Comic-Con 2016 Interview: Cassandra Peterson on Her New Book, Her Legacy in Horror, and 35 Years of Elvira

26 July 2016 10:47 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Over this past weekend at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con, this writer had the opportunity to speak with none other than Cassandra Peterson, the beloved actress and performer who is forever engrained in the pop culture lexicon as the horror hostess Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. Growing up, Elvira’s weekly show, Movie Macabre, was a huge part of my childhood and horror education, which made our conversation a career highlight and a truly unforgettable experience for me, both personally and professionally.

During our chat, Peterson discussed her influential career over the last 35 years, including her latest project, the Elvira: Mistress of the Dark photo book that hits shelves this October. She also talked about being a female horror icon during the 1980s, her favorite and least favorite movies she celebrated on Movie Macabre, and more.

Really great to speak with you today, Cassandra. What’s really cool about your career »

- Heather Wixson

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Report: True Blood to Become Musical

2 July 2016 1:22 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Goodbye, Bon Temps. Hello, Broadway?

HBO’s now-cancelled vampire drama True Blood is in the very early stages of becoming a musical, the New York Post reports.

VideosTV’s Steamiest Sex: Watch Pulse-Raising True Blood, Scandal and Game of Thrones Scenes (*If Your Boss Isn’t Looking)

The project — with music by Nathan Barr, who composed the music for the TV series, and book and lyrics by Living Dead Girl author Elizabeth Scott — apparently recently held a hush-hush table read. As such, details are scarce, but per the Post: The musical is set in the same little Louisiana town as »

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Therapy For A Vampire – Review

23 June 2016 11:59 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Summer just officially started just a few days ago, so Halloween is months away. Perhaps a great way to get us cooled off, to put us in a Fall state of mind, would be to pay a visit to one of the oldest horror movie icons: the vampire. Everyone’s aware of how scary those fanged fiends can be, but you may have forgotten how funny they are (intentionally, of course). Movie audiences have emitted nervous laughter ever since  Max Schreck emerged from the shadows in the silent classic Nosferatu. And certainly there are bits (and bites) of humor (mostly comic relief supporting players) in 1931’s Dracula and Mark Of The Vampire, both with Bela Lugosi. It wasn’t until 1948 that he was in an all out farce (though the Count is never lampooned) in Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein. After Hammer Studios brought back (in full gory color) the bloodsuckers ten years later, »

- Jim Batts

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The Smallest Show On Earth: In Memory Of The Bijou (1957) And The Alger (1940-2015)

18 June 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience of seeing cinema in a darkened, and in this case dilapidated old auditorium, alongside my appreciation of my own hometown movie house, the Alger, which opened in 1940 and closed last year, one more victim of economics and the move toward digital distribution and exhibition.


“You mean to tell me my uncle actually charged people to go in there? And people actually paid?” –Matt Spenser (Bill Travers) upon first seeing the condition of the Bijou Kinema, in The Smallest Show on Earth

In Basil Dearden’s charming and wistful 1957 British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth (also »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Gene Gutowski, Producer of Polanski Films and Holocaust Survivor, Dies at 90

11 May 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Gene Gutowski, who produced three of Roman Polanski‘s 1960s movies and was a co-producer on the director’s 2002 Oscar winning Holocaust drama, “The Pianist,” has died. He was 90. Gutowski’s son Adam Bardach told the Associated Press that his father died of pneumonia at a hospital in Warsaw, Poland. Gutowski and Polanski collaborated on “Repulsion,” “Cul-de-Sac” and “The Fearless Vampire Killers” in the 1960s. They reunited more than three decades later on “The Pianist.” Also Read: William Schallert, Character Actor and Former SAG President, Dies at 93 The movie was “a personal catharsis” for Gutowski, who wrote that “watching crowds of terrified helpless. »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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6 May 2016 7:25 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

What is this -- a naughty sex odyssey as absurdist art? Or a non-pc slice of sleazy art film exploitation? Either way it's a (minor) Polanski masterpiece of direction, influenced by the Italian setting. Is what turns Polanski on? The entire excercise is a Kafka comedy of erotic discomfort. What? Blu-ray Severin 1972 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 110 min. / Che? / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 29.95 Starring Marcello Mastroianni, Sydne Rome, Hugh Griffith, Guido Alberti, Gianfranco Piacentini, Romollo Valli. Cinematography Marcello Gatti, Giuseppe Ruzzolini Production Design Aurelio Crugnola Film Editor Alastair McIntyre Original Music Claudio Gizzi Written by Gérard Brach, Roman Polanski Produced by Carlo Ponti Directed by Roman Polanski

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

It's a slippery slope, I tell you: art films are the gateway to surrealism, and surrealism connects straight to bondage and kinky costume play, which is a direct conduit either to Comic-Con or being forced to resign from the P.T.A. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Broadway's Secret Weapon

6 May 2016 2:53 AM, PDT | | See recent CultureCatch news »

Drew Hodges is at a loss for words. Asked if he’s surprised at the life he’s leading -- did he imagine he’d grow up to fly around the world orchestrating scenes with great actors and artists for his own wildly influential agency -- he pauses three entire seconds. “I wish I had an answer for you,” he says. “It's like, Come for the veal, stay for the floor show.”

You might not know Drew Hodges’ name, but if you’ve enjoyed some form of popular culture in the past decade, you’re living in a world he helped create. "When I started, the idea of theater was still very much that ‘fabulous invalid’ thing," he says, “sort of dying, old, kind of nostalgic. I was lucky enough to work on a lot of stuff that started to chip away at that."

Twenty years ago, art-directing for his small design firm’s music, »

- Helen Eisenbach

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When Eight Bells Toll

8 March 2016 9:13 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

This forgotten Alistair MacLean action thriller packs a rare starring role for the young Anthony Hopkins -- he's really good as secret agent Philip Calvert, battling gold thieves in the Scottish Isles. He's got a James Bond attitude in a more down-to-Earth adventure. When Eight Bells Toll Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1971 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 94 min. / Street Date March 8, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Anthony Hopkins, Robert Morley, Nathalie Delon, Jack Hawkins, Corin Redgrave, Ferdy Mayne, Wendy Allnutt, Maurice Roëves, Derek Bond, Leon Collins, Peter Arne, Oliver MacGreevy, Tom Chatto, Del Henney. Cinematography Arthur Ibbetson Film Editor John Shirley Original Music Angela Morley Written by Alistair MacLean from his novel Produced by Elliott Kastner Directed by Etienne Périer

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Producer Elliott Kastner stretched Alistair MacLean's brand of military action adventure to James Bond extremes in the expensive, very popular Where Eagles Dare of 1968. Several MacLean adaptations got underway, »

- Glenn Erickson

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Douglas Slocombe, Acclaimed Cinematographer, Dead At Age 103

22 February 2016 3:20 PM, PST | | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Slocombe with Harrison Ford and Steven Spielberg filming "Raiders of the Lost Ark" in 1981. (Photo: LucasFilm).

Douglas Slocombe, the acclaimed cinematographer and director of photography, has passed away at age 103. Slocombe was revered by directors over a career that extended from 1940 to 1989, when he lensed his final film, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade". He had also filmed the first two entries in the Indiana Jones series, "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom". Slocombe never won an Oscar but was nominated for "Travels with My Aunt", "Julia" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark". He had been nominated for eleven BAFTA awards, winning three times. Slocombe's other major films include the Ealing Studios British comedy classics starring Alec Guinness, the classic chiller "Dead of Night", "The Blue Max", "The Lion in Winter", the original version of "The Italian Job", "The Fearless Vampire Killers", "The Great Gatsby »

- (Cinema Retro)

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Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103

22 February 2016 12:05 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-nominated British cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, whose many films include several classic Ealing comedies in the 1940s and ’50s and the first three Indiana Jones pics in the 1980s, has died, his family told the Agence France-Presse. He was 103.

Slocombe drew Oscar noms for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He is famous within the industry for never having used a light meter on the set of “Raiders.”

He shot Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in the White Suit.”

During the 1960s he was d.p. on films including “The Servant,” “The Blue Max,” “The Fearless Vampire Killers,” “The Lion in Winter” and “The Italian Job.”

In addition to the pics for which he was Oscar nominated, he shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball” in the 1970s.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade »

- Carmel Dagan

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2016, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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