IMDb > Oedipus Rex (1967)

Oedipus Rex (1967) More at IMDbPro »Edipo re (original title)

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Overview

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Release Date:
7 September 1967 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
In pre-war Italy, a young couple have a baby boy. The father, however, is jealous of his son - and the scene moves to antiquity... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
3 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
The really real See more (10 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Silvana Mangano ... Jocasta

Franco Citti ... Oedipus

Alida Valli ... Merope
Carmelo Bene ... Creon

Julian Beck ... Tiresias
Luciano Bartoli ... Laius
Francesco Leonetti ... Laius' Servant
Ahmed Belhachmi ... Polybus
Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia ... Priest (as Ivan Scratuglia)
Giandomenico Davoli ... Shepherd

Ninetto Davoli ... Angelo the Messenger
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Laura Betti ... Jocasta's Maid (uncredited)

Pier Paolo Pasolini ... High Priest (uncredited)
Isabel Ruth ... Jocasta's Maid with a Lamb (uncredited)
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Directed by
Pier Paolo Pasolini 
 
Writing credits
Pier Paolo Pasolini 

Sophocles  play "Oedipus Rex" (uncredited)

Produced by
Alfredo Bini .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Giuseppe Ruzzolini 
 
Film Editing by
Nino Baragli 
 
Production Design by
Luigi Scaccianoce 
 
Set Decoration by
Andrea Fantacci 
 
Costume Design by
Danilo Donati 
 
Makeup Department
Ernesta Cesetti .... hair stylist
Maria Teresa Corridoni .... hair stylist
Giulio Natalucci .... makeup artist
Goffredo Rocchetti .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Eliseo Boschi .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jean-Claude Biette .... assistant director (as Jean Claude Biette)
Benoît Lamy .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Dante Ferretti .... assistant production designer
 
Sound Department
Fausto Ancillai .... sound mixer
Gilles Barberis .... audio restorer
Carlo Tarchi .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Bruno Bruni .... still photographer
Sergio Rubini .... assistant camera
Otello Spila .... camera operator
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Piero Cicoletti .... assistant costume designer
 
Other crew
Lina D'Amico .... script supervisor
Walter Fabrizio .... production secretary
Paolo Ferrari .... voice dubbing: Franco Citti
 

Production CompaniesDistributors
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Edipo re" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
104 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Canada:14+ (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Italy:VM18 (original rating) | Italy:VM14 (re-rating) (1993) | Spain:13 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (video rating) (1990)
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Sophocles, the author of the original Greek tragedy on which this film is based, is given no on-screen credit.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Black Dahlia (2006) (V)See more »

FAQ

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4 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
The really real, 7 July 2013
Author: chaos-rampant from Greece

Another marvelous film by Pasolini.

No one is as cinematically intense as this man, but it's not an ordinary intensity he affects. It does not result from the withholding of narrative or visual information, it is not primarily a dramatic intensity; Lean, Hitchcock, Kurosawa, all did some terrific work in that external mode where we see the struggling human being in the cleanly revealed world of choices and fates.

Pasolini works his way around all that, starting with one of the most archetypal stories. Here we have anticipation, foreknowledge as fate. And of course there is some dramatic intensity in this and others of his films, but that's not what makes him special. He can create heightened worlds that we experience with a real intensity. It goes back to that film movement called Neorealism which thrived in postwar Italy, where the utmost goal was to soak up a more human, more universal conflict as we staggered through broken pieces of the world.

Looking back now it seems stale, we have a much more refined sense of what is real, we can see the conceit of the camera. But two filmmakers emerged from out of this movement who did work in a more radical direction, moving the images closer to perception.

Antonioni is one of the greatest adventures in film. Pasolini is the other. The larger point with him is to have an intensely spiritual experience of a whole new storyworld, to that effect he selects myths that we have more or less fixed notions about how they should be (this, Medea, his Gospel film) and films them to have invigorating presence in the now.

Every artistic choice in the film reflects that; the dresses, the swords, the landscapes, the faces, it's all intensely unusual to what you'd expect from Greek myth, seemingly handcarved to be from a preconscious world outside maps and time. The camera also reflects that; he could have plainly asked of a fixed camera and smooth, fixed traveling shots from his crew, but evidently he wants that warm lull of the human hand. It's a different sort of beauty, not in some painted image but in our placement in evocative space.

When Oedipus visits the oracle at Delphii, we do not have sweeping shots of some ornate marble structure as you'd expect in a Hollywood film. A congregation of dustcaked villagers is gathered in a clearing before a group of trees, the oracle is a frightening old crone attended by slender boys in masks. The roads are dusty, interminable ribbons dropped by absent-minded gods. A Berber village in Morocco stands for ancient Thebes. Sudden dances. Silvana Mangano. And those headgear! It's all about extraordinariness in the sense of moving beyond inherited limits of truth.

It works. This is a world of divinity, causal belief, and blind seeing into truth that even though it was fated, we discover anew in the sands.

The sequence where a feverish Oedipus confronts his father at the crossroads will stay with me for a long time, the running, the sun, the distance where tethers are pulled taut.

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why the different eras? curekid238
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This movie is weird. Nunnof
Music for Pasolini's Oedipus Rex madrigal6
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