IMDb > The Dirty Dozen (1967)
The Dirty Dozen
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The Dirty Dozen (1967) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
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Up 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay) and
Lukas Heller (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Dirty Dozen on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 June 1967 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Train them! Excite them! Arm them!...Then turn them loose on the Nazis!
Plot:
A US Army Major is assigned a dozen convicted murderers to train and lead them into a mass assassination mission of German officers in World War II. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 5 wins & 6 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
One of the most quintessential macho movies of all time. See more (148 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Lee Marvin ... Maj. Reisman

Ernest Borgnine ... Gen. Worden

Charles Bronson ... Joseph Wladislaw

Jim Brown ... Robert Jefferson

John Cassavetes ... Victor Franko

Richard Jaeckel ... Sgt. Bowren

George Kennedy ... Maj. Max Armbruster
Trini López ... Pedro Jiminez (as Trini Lopez)

Ralph Meeker ... Capt. Stuart Kinder

Robert Ryan ... Col. Everett Dasher Breed

Telly Savalas ... Archer Maggott

Donald Sutherland ... Vernon Pinkley

Clint Walker ... Samson Posey

Robert Webber ... Gen. Denton
Tom Busby ... Milo Vladek
Ben Carruthers ... Glenn Gilpin

Stuart Cooper ... Roscoe Lever
Robert Phillips ... Cpl. Morgan - MP Guard
Colin Maitland ... Seth Sawyer
Al Mancini ... Tassos Bravos
George Roubicek ... Pvt. Arthur James Gardner
Thick Wilson ... Gen. Worden's Aide
Dora Reisser ... German Officer's Girl
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lewis Alexander ... German Officer (uncredited)
Michael Anthony ... German Officer in Staff Car (uncredited)
Cynthia Bizeray ... German Officer's Wife (uncredited)
Leo Britt ... German General in Staff Car (uncredited)
Harry Brooks Jr. ... German Officer (uncredited)
Alan Chuntz ... French Servant (uncredited)
Gerry Crampton ... Clayton (uncredited)
Hugh Elton ... German Officer (uncredited)
Gary Files ... Ambulance Driver (uncredited)
Judith Furse ... Drunken General's Wife (uncredited)
Hal Galili ... MP Master Sergeant / Hangman (uncredited)
Romo Gorrara ... Airborne Soldier (uncredited)

Willoughby Gray ... German Officer (uncredited)
Gerard Heinz ... Card-Playing German Officer (uncredited)
John G. Heller ... 2nd German Sentry at Chateau (uncredited)
George Hilsdon ... Medical Officer at Hanging (uncredited)
John Hollis ... German Porter at Chateau (uncredited)
Alf Joint ... German Sentry Wanting Light (uncredited)
Juba Kennerley ... German Officer (uncredited)
Eric Kent ... Airborne Soldier (uncredited)
John Ketteringham ... (uncredited)

Hildegard Knef ... (uncredited)
Ann Lancaster ... Prostitute (uncredited)
Aileen Lewis ... German Officer's Wife (uncredited)

Richard Marner ... German Sentry at Chateau (uncredited)

Dick Miller ... MP at Hanging (uncredited)
Lou Morgan ... MP Putting Hood on Gardner (uncredited)
Lionel Murton ... MP Lt. Col. in charge at hanging (uncredited)
Suzanne Owens-Duval ... Prostitute (uncredited)
Mike Reid ... Sergeant at War Games HQ (uncredited)
Terry Richards ... Blake (uncredited)
Gordon Ruttan ... MP Corporal / Desk Clerk (uncredited)
Frederick Schiller ... Drunken German General (uncredited)
Michael Segal ... Airborne Band Conductor (uncredited)
Richard Shaw ... German Officer Who Seals the Bunker (uncredited)
Warren Stanhope ... German Officer (uncredited)
Michael Stayner ... German Radio Operator (uncredited)
Emile Stemmler ... German Officer (uncredited)
John Tatum ... German Officer (uncredited)
Rocky Taylor ... Airborne Soldier (uncredited)
Burnell Tucker ... Army Doctor (uncredited)
Hedger Wallace ... German Officer (uncredited)
Theodore Wilhelm ... German Officer (uncredited)
Vicki Woolf ... Prostitute (uncredited)

Directed by
Robert Aldrich 
 
Writing credits
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay) and
Lukas Heller (screenplay)

E.M. Nathanson (novel)

Produced by
Raymond Anzarut .... associate producer
Kenneth Hyman .... producer
 
Original Music by
Frank De Vol  (as De Vol)
 
Cinematography by
Edward Scaife (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Michael Luciano 
 
Art Direction by
William Hutchinson  (as W.E. Hutchinson)
 
Makeup Department
Ernest Gasser .... makeup artist
Wally Schneiderman .... makeup artist (as Walter Schneiderman)
 
Production Management
Julian Mackintosh .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Bert Batt .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Colin Grimes .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Tim Hutchinson .... set designer (uncredited)
Mickey Lennon .... assistant property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Claude Hitchcock .... sound recording
Franklin Milton .... sound recording
John Poyner .... sound editor
Van Allen James .... sound editor (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Cliff Richardson .... special effects supervisor
Alan Barnard .... special effects (uncredited)
Jimmy Harris .... special effects (uncredited)
Peter Hutchinson .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
Garth Inns .... special effects (uncredited)
Roy Whybrow .... special effects (uncredited)
Jack Woodbridge .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Ken Buckle .... stunts (uncredited)
Alan Chuntz .... stunts (uncredited)
Gerry Crampton .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Gerry Crampton .... stunts (uncredited)
Jim Dowdall .... stunts (uncredited)
Joe Dunne .... stunts (uncredited)
Romo Gorrara .... stunts (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
Alf Joint .... stunts (uncredited)
Rick Lester .... stunt performer (uncredited)
William Offer .... stunts (uncredited)
Terence Plummer .... stunts (uncredited)
Nosher Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
Mike Reid .... stunt driver (uncredited)
Terry Richards .... stunts (uncredited)
Roy Scammell .... stunts (uncredited)
Rocky Taylor .... stunts (uncredited)
Paul Weston .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Alan McCabe .... camera operator
Tony Spratling .... camera operator
Chris Ashbrook .... focus puller: second unit (uncredited)
Jim Dawes .... grip (uncredited)
Dennis Fraser .... grip (uncredited)
Edward Michael Perry .... electrician (uncredited)
Paul Wilson .... camera operator (uncredited)
David Wynn-Jones .... clapper loader (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Armbruster .... conductor (uncredited)
Robert Bain .... musician: guitar (uncredited)
Harry Bluestone .... musician: violin (uncredited)
Frank De Vol .... conductor (uncredited)
Artie Kane .... musician: piano (uncredited)
Virginia Majewski .... musician: viola (uncredited)
Michael J. McDonald .... score remixer (uncredited)
Red Mitchell .... musician: bass (uncredited)
Uan Rasey .... musician: trumpet (uncredited)
Raymond Turner .... musician: piano (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Walter Lesley Tiley .... truck driver (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Angela Allen .... continuity
Walter Blake .... main title design
Jim Dowdall .... armorer (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Dirty Dozen" - International (English title) (informal title)
See more »
Runtime:
150 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.75 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Stereo | 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M (DVD rating) | Australia:PG (cable rating) | Finland:K-16 | Germany:16 (DVD rating) | Iceland:16 | Netherlands:12 | Norway:15 | Norway:16 (1968) | Singapore:PG | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (tv rating) | UK:12 (video re-rating) (2006) | UK:15 (video rating) (1986) (1995) | USA:Not Rated | USA:Approved (certificate #20802) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Construction of the faux chateau proved *too* good. The script called for it to be blown up, but the construction was so solid that 70 tons of explosives would have been needed to achieve the effect! Instead, a section was rebuilt from cork and plastic.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: In the chateau scene, the German girl has a 1967 hairstyle and clothing.See more »
Quotes:
Major John Reisman:Boy, do I love that Franko.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Don't Blame MeSee more »

FAQ

What is 'The Dirty Dozen' about?
Who are the 'dirty dozen'?
Is 'The Dirty Dozen' based on a book?
See more »
21 out of 23 people found the following review useful.
One of the most quintessential macho movies of all time., 11 December 2010
Author: Spikeopath from United Kingdom

The Dirty Dozen is directed by Robert Aldrich and adapted for the screen by Nunnally Johnson & Lukas Heller from the novel by E. M. Nathanson. It stars Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Telly Savalas, Charles Bronson, John Cassavetes, Donald Sutherland, Richard Jaeckel, Robert Ryan and Jim Brown.

1944, just prior to D-Day….

Major Reisman (Marvin) is a none conformist kind of guy and he riles the higher brass no end, so it comes as no surprise to him that he is the man assigned the unenviable task of assembling a suicide squad of army criminals for a mission to destroy a château in France. This particular château has no military value as such, but as it is used by many of the Nazi big chiefs, destroying it whilst they relax inside will upset the German plans immensely. But can this rag tag band of murderers, rapists and thieves shape up into something resembling a fighting force? Their reward, should they survive the mission, is amnesty, but Reisman for sure has his hands full on both sides of the war.

"One: down to the road block, we've just begun.. Two: the guards are through.. Three: the Major's men are on a spree.. Four: Major and Wladislaw go through the door.. Five: Pinkley stays out in the drive.. Six: the Major gives the rope a fix.. Seven: Wladislaw throws the hook to heaven.. Eight: Jiménez has got a date.. Nine: the other guys go up the line.. Ten: Sawyer and Gilpin are in the pen.. Eleven: Posey guards points five and seven.. Twelve: Wladislaw and the Major go down to delve.. Thirteen: Franko goes up without being seen.. Fourteen: Zero-hour, Jiménez cuts the cable, Franko cuts the phone.. Fifteen: Franko goes in where the others have been.. Sixteen: We all come out like it's Halloween...."

The Dirty Dozen has become one of those films that is a perennial holiday favourite like The Great Escape, Zulu and The Magnificent Seven. Which while it most definitely deserves such big exposure, it's a little surprising it's part of the holiday viewing schedules given its cynicism and amoral core; just one of the many great & intriguing things about Aldrich's testosterone laced movie. Met with mixed reviews on release, with the negative side of the fence bemoaning its nasty violence and preposterous plot, The Dirty Dozen none the less performed great at the box office where it was the fifth highest grosser of the year and the number one money maker in terms of profit to budget. Coming as it did during the middle of the Vietnam War, it was evident that the paying public quite easily bought into the thematics of The Dirty Dozen. Nearly 45 years since it first lured people into the cinema, Aldrich's movie shows no sign of age, or better still-and more remarkable-its enjoyability has not diminished.

What makes it a great film, then? First off is the all-star macho cast assembled by Aldrich and his team, big hitters like Marvin (stepping in when John Wayne balked at the script), Borgnine, Kennedy, Ryan and Bronson were already names to the public, but these are also supplemented by soon to be "stars" like Cassavetes, Sutherland and Savalas (also stepping into a role vacated by another, this time Jack Palance who didn't like the racial aggression of the character) & stoic performers like Jaeckel & Robert Webber. While curio value comes with the casting of singer Trini Lopez and Gridiron star Jim Brown. Throw Clint Walker into the pot as well and you have got a considerable amount of beef in the stew! Secondly the film led the way for a slew of movies that featured bad guys as heroes, with that Aldrich's film holds up well as being a hugely influential piece. Then thirdly is that not only is it intermittently funny as the violence explodes on the screen, but that it's also chocked full of action and adventure. All that and for those so inclined you can find questionable morals under scrutiny and see the "war is hell" banner firmly flown during the nastiness of the missions culmination.

Split into three parts; meet the guys; see them train & the mission, Dirty Dozen has been criticised for its lack of realism, but is that really needed in what is essentially a male fantasy piece setting out to entertain? Besides which, lets applaud it for acknowledging that brutality and atrocities were committed on both sides of the fence. Rest assured, The Dirty Dozen still had enough edginess about it back in the 60s. It's also true enough to say that the characters, are in the main, stereotypes, and that the unravelling story is a touch clichéd, but these are men that men want to be (okay maybe not Savalas' religious maniac rapist!) and men that women can cast a flirtatious eye over: there's plenty of character here to hang your hats and undergarments on; appealing to the inner rebel hidden away in many a viewer. The message's in there are not sledge hammered into the story (Aldrich always said he wasn't making a message movie, just a film about camaraderie and unlikely heroes), and the construction of the action is top notch from one of America's most under appreciated directors. It's nicely shot in 70mm MetroColor/MetroScope by Edward Scaife (Night of the Demon/Khartoum) and features a suitably boisterous music score from Frank De Vol (Cat Ballou/The Flight of the Phoenix).

It's a far from flawless picture, of that there is no doubt, but it's loved by millions and continues to gain an audience yearly who are willing to view it on its own entertaining terms. As a boy I wanted to be Lee Marvin because of this film, as a middle aged man now, I still want to be Lee Marvin in this film. That's yet another reason why The Dirty Dozen is so great. 10/10

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