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The Red and the White (1967) More at IMDbPro »Csillagosok, katonák (original title)


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5 items from 2014


Movie Poster of the Week: Peter Strausfeld’s Posters for the Early Films of Miklós Jancsó

21 February 2014 5:30 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

When the great Hungarian filmmaker Miklós Jancsó died on January 31 of this year at the age of 92, the news rippled somberly around the cinephile world but didn’t make much of a splash. Jancsó was undoubtedly one of the titans of modern cinema, but he was also something of a forgotten man. He made some 30 feature films over 52 years and was working almost until the end. His final feature, So Much for Justice!, was made just four years ago and yet, like most of his recent work, it was probably never shown in the U.S.. (You can see a fascinating, though unsubtitled, piece on the making of it here and it looks like classic Jancsó, tracking shots and all.) 

Though he made some terrific films in the 80s, like the evocatively titled Season of Monsters and Jesus Christ’s Horoscope, it was the 1960s and 70s which were Jancsó’s heyday, »

- Adrian Curry

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Miklós Jancsó obituary

31 January 2014 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film director who used powerful symbolism to depict the fight for Hungarian socialism and independence

At the 1966 Cannes film festival, a movie whose title sounded like a western – but was actually Hungarian – caused a sensation and launched its director into the international cinematic scene, where he was to remain for a decade. The film of hypnotic beauty and daring technique was The Round-Up (Szegénylegények, literally translated as The Outlaws) and the director was Miklós Jancsó, who has died aged 92.

Jancsó's highly personal style had blossomed in this, his fifth feature. The Round-Up is set on a bleak Hungarian plain in 1868, when Austro‑Hungarian troops tried to break the unity of the Hungarian partisans by torture, interrogations and killings. There is little dialogue as horsemen drive the people to and fro, with power continually changing hands. Jancsó's ritualistic style manages to make the particular Hungarian situation into a universal parable of evil, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Cannes-winner and long take master Miklos Jancso dies at 92

31 January 2014 3:02 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Hungarian filmmaker Miklós Jancsó, winner of the best director award at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, died Friday. He was 92.

Jancsó’s death after a long illness was announced by the Association of Hungarian Film Artists.

Known for his long takes and for depicting the passage of time in his historical epics merely by changes of costume, Jancsó won his Cannes award for Red Psalm, about a 19th-century peasant revolt.

In the 1960s, critics ranked Jancso alongside great directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman. However, it was his use of scantily clad women, symbolizing defencelessness, which drew big audiences in prudish communist Hungary. »

- Associated Press

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Miklos Jancso, Hungarian Filmmaker Who Won at Cannes, Dies at 92

31 January 2014 2:05 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hungarian filmmaker Miklos Jancso, winner of the best director award at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival, died Friday after a long illness. He was 92.

Known for his long takes and for depicting the passage of time in his historical epics merely by changes of costume, Jancso won his Cannes award for “Red Psalm,” about a 19th-century peasant revolt.

In the 1960s, critics ranked Jancso alongside great directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman. However, it was his use of scantily clad women, symbolizing defenselessness, which drew big audiences in prudish Communist Hungary.

Jancso was born in Vac, a small town north of Budapest. His parents were refugees from Transylvania, once a part of Hungary.

“My mother was Romanian. In civilian life, the family members were friends, but politically on opposite sides … For me this was a great lesson, that conflict, much less violence, will never solve the nationality problems,” Jancso said. »

- Associated Press

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Miklós Jancsó dies at 92

31 January 2014 7:10 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Hungarian director Miklós Jancsó Hungarian film director Miklós Jancsó has died at the age of 92 after a long illness.

Jancsó's films included My Way Home (Így jöttem, 1964), The Round-Up (Szegénylegények, 1965), The Red And The White (Csillagosok, katonák, 1967), Silence and Cry (Csend és kiáltás, 1968) The Confrontation (Fényes szelek, 1968) and Red Psalm (Még kér a nép, 1971) - for which was awarded the Best Director prize at Cannes in 1972. He was at the forefront of the revival of Hungarian cinema and was known the starkness of his themes and a distinctive visual style that influenced filmmakers as diverse as Sergio Leone and Béla Tarr.

He received lifetime achievement awards in Cannes in 1979, Venice in 1990 and Budapest in 1994.

Fellow Hungarian director István Szabó said: “Jancsó occupies a unique place in Hungarian culture. If he hadn't made such films as The Round-Up, My Way Home, »

- Amber Wilkinson

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2014 | 2012 | 2011

5 items from 2014


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