IMDb > Prescription: Murder (1968) (TV)
Prescription: Murder
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Prescription: Murder (1968) (TV) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   1,520 votes »
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Down 14% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Richard Levinson (teleplay) &
William Link (teleplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Prescription: Murder on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
20 February 1968 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A psychiatrist uses a patient he is having an affair with to help him kill his wife, but his perfect alibi may come apart at the hands of a seemingly befuddled LAPD lieutenant. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(6 articles)
Remembering Peter Falk
 (From CinemaRetro. 25 June 2011, 8:55 AM, PDT)

‘Just One Last Thing’ – A Personal Appreciation of Peter Falk
 (From Obsessed with Film. 25 June 2011, 12:17 AM, PDT)

Peter Falk 1927-2011
 (From FilmJunk. 24 June 2011, 5:21 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Colombo Unplugged See more (33 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Peter Falk ... Lt. Columbo

Gene Barry ... Dr. Ray Flemming
Katherine Justice ... Joan Hudson

William Windom ... Burt Gordon

Nina Foch ... Carol Flemming

Virginia Gregg ... Miss Petrie

Andrea King ... Cynthia Gordon
Susanne Benton ... The Blonde
Ena Hartman ... Nurse
Sherry Boucher ... Air Hostess
Anthony James ... Tommy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frank Baker ... Man in Park (uncredited)
Jim Creech ... Policeman in Hospital (uncredited)
Clark Howat ... Doctor (uncredited)
Mark Russell ... Policeman (uncredited)
Don Stewart ... Airline Ticket Man (uncredited)
Tom Williams ... Laundry Delivery Man (uncredited)

Directed by
Richard Irving 
 
Writing credits
Richard Levinson (teleplay) &
William Link (teleplay)

Richard Levinson (play) &
William Link (play)

Produced by
Jerrold Freedman .... associate producer
Richard Irving .... producer
 
Original Music by
Dave Grusin 
 
Cinematography by
Ray Rennahan (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Richard G. Wray 
 
Art Direction by
Russell Kimball 
 
Set Decoration by
John McCarthy Jr.  (as John McCarthy)
James Redd  (as James S. Redd)
 
Makeup Department
Larry Germain .... hair stylist
Bud Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Edward K. Dodds .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
George Bisk .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
James T. Porter .... sound
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Burton Miller .... costumes
 
Editorial Department
Richard Belding .... editorial supervisor
Robert Brower .... color coordinator
 
Music Department
Stanley Wilson .... musical supervisor
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
100 min | 99 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:M (video rating) | Finland:K-7 (2004) | UK:PG | UK:PG (video rating) (1996)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Bing Crosby was also offered the role of Columbo, but didn't accept it because he felt that it would interfere with his golfing.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Joan Hudson is under observation from outside her apartment, her silhouette is visible on the curtains as she moves about. She is clearly visible from top to toe. When the scene moves inside the apartment, the shadow of her lower half is completely obscured by a large sofa and a table.See more »
Quotes:
Dr. Ray Flemming:Lieutenant, for the past week, you've been asking me some rather pointless questions, and I am getting very tired of them.See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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9 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
Colombo Unplugged, 7 March 2005
Author: Robert J. Maxwell (rmax304823@yahoo.com) from Deming, New Mexico, USA

One of the best entries in the series, and the first. "Colombo" followed the usual trajectory of commercially viable TV series. A few good episodes while the cast and writers got their acts together, then a string of iconic hits, followed by a slow deflation. Sometimes, as with "Colombo", the series is resurrected to see if there may be another nickel worth squeezing out of it.

Come to think of it, lots of art styles follow the same route. Exactitude followed by sloppiness followed by decadence. Egyptian hieroglyphics of three thousand years ago used a very carefully carved picture of a snake. Borrowed and passed on, the picture got sloppier until it turned into our letter "N".

The style presented in this particular episode can be called primitive but careful. Colombo is recognizable, but he has not yet become his rumpled and wrinkled self. His tie is straight, his hair is short, his shirt laundered, and his raincoat pressed. (We don't see his shoes.) And he can become forceful and harsh when the situation calls for it.

The plot's complicated but not hard to follow. Colombo doesn't appear until post crime, about midway through the movie. As usual his suspicions are aroused by tiny bumps in the scenario, which everyone else can find good, sound reasons for. And he rambles on without apparent point about his losing the pencils his wife gives him every morning.

It's efficiently done. Not exactly part of the glorious golden age which was to follow, but a first-rate prelude. Gene Barry's head looks awesomely brachycephalic from behind, like a small bowling ball. Katherine Justice is is patient mistress, or patient/mistress, complicit in the murder of Barry's wife. I swear that if you close your eyes when she delivers her lines, you can hear Kim Novak speaking.

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Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Too big dress? jlschook
Put the lights out ...a never explained clue? bob-ktown
Columbo's First Name MeratH
What offensive thing does Dr. Fleming say @ the end Thindy_Brady
Sunglasses at night jlschook
Blue dress rtaggart-1
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