Carry on Doctor (1967) - News Poster

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DVD Review: Poor Cow

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ 1967 was the year of Carry On Doctor, Quatermass and the Pit and two James Bond movies. It also saw the feature debut of acclaimed television director Kenneth Loach with Poor Cow, starring Terence Stamp, fresh from his first brush of Hollywood fame and Carol White, who had starred in the television drama Cathy Comes Home that had propelled both its star and director into the national limelight. Based on Nell Dunn's novel - Loach had used her work before in another Wednesday Play Up the Junction - Poor Cow tells the story of Joy (White), a working class young mother whose progress through life seems beset with woes.
See full article at CineVue »

Infamy! Infamy! Carry On films to carry on again after 25 years

Producers on lookout for fresh homegrown talent as Carry On Doctors kicks off a revival of the long-running comedy series

The first Carry On movie in 25 years, Carry On Doctors, is to be released in cinemas as part of a revival of the long-running British comedy series, according to Variety.

The new instalment will be the first in a slate of new films, with producers hoping to recruit a fresh ensemble of homegrown talent to star in them. The debut instalment, not to be confused with 1968’s Carry On Doctor, will be written by Tim Dawson and Susan Nickson, best known as the writers of the BBC sitcom Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Confessions of a Doctor review – when GPs were men and (mostly) right

Real-life doctors-and-nurses escapades, sherry evenings, cricket, and bags of lovely drugs: it really was different being a doctor in the 1960s and 70s

If last week’s Confessions of a Copper was Gene Hunt’s Life on Mars, only for real, then Confessions of a Doctor (Channel 4) is Carry on Doctor: the Documentary. To begin with anyway, then it turns into an entertaining yet also serious look into how general practice and the role of the Gp has changed in the past half-century or so.

In the good old days (the 1960s), doctors were men and nurses were women, and they used to play Doctors and Nurses, the adult version. “We tried to concentrate on what the patient was saying but there were lots of distractions,” says Robert here. “Marvellous, wonderful stuff.”

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Take a deep breath: the stethoscope is dying

That cultural symbol of medics – from Kenneth Williams in Carry On Doctor to Edie Falcon's Nurse Jackie – is being replaced by cheaper and more accurate ultrasound devices

If you Google "Hugh Laurie" and "stethoscope", you will come up with a clutch of stories from February 2012 about how everybody's favourite pill-popping misanthropic physician is "hanging up his stethoscope" after eight seasons on the hit show House.

This underlines a more general truth: doctors don't retire, they hang up their stethoscopes. Is there any profession so proverbially connected to one tool of their trade? Will people believe you are a doctor if you don't wear one?

These questions become topical because the stethoscope is reportedly becoming obsolete, nearly 200 years after it was invented. Is it anything to do with the finding that a third of Us stethoscopes used in emergencies were contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (Mrsa) bacteria? No, but it probably didn't help.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Campling Dies; Sound Editor Worked on ‘Platoon’

Film and sound editor David Campling, who worked on such films as “Platoon” and “The Terminator,” died May 9 in Los Angeles of cancer. He was 73.

Campling earned a BAFTA nomination for his sound work on 1971’s “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” directed by John Schlesinger and was nominated for an Mpse Golden Reel award for “Platoon.”

Trained at Pinewood and Twickenham Studios, Campling’s sound editing career began with Roman Polanski’s 1966 “Cul-de-sac.” He did sound work on such varied films as “The Day of the Locust” and “Carry on Doctor.”

Most of his editing work was for TV including MTV’s “Undressed” and telepics such as “Knots Landing: Back to the Cul de Sac” and “Through the Eyes of a Killer.”

A longtime BAFTA Los Angeles board member who did a stint as treasurer, he produced the org’s tribute to Schlesinger at the Egyptian Theater in 2002. He co-founded the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

David Campling Dies; Sound Editor Worked on ‘Platoon’

Film and sound editor David Campling, who worked on such films as “Platoon” and “The Terminator,” died May 9 in Los Angeles of cancer. He was 73.

Campling earned a BAFTA nomination for his sound work on 1971’s “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” directed by John Schlesinger and was nominated for an Mpse Golden Reel award for “Platoon.”

Trained at Pinewood and Twickenham Studios, Campling’s sound editing career began with Roman Polanski’s 1966 “Cul-de-sac.” He did sound work on such varied films as “The Day of the Locust” and “Carry on Doctor.”

Most of his editing work was for TV including MTV’s “Undressed” and telepics such as “Knots Landing: Back to the Cul de Sac” and “Through the Eyes of a Killer.”

A longtime BAFTA Los Angeles board member who did a stint as treasurer, he produced the org’s tribute to Schlesinger at the Egyptian Theater in 2002. He co-founded the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Letters: Why police spies are nothing like 007

Your report rightly characterises Judge Tugendhat's references to James Bond in the undercover police case (Judge: we all know spies sleep with targets, just like Bond, 18 January) as bizarre; but they also draw attention to an essential factor he seems to ignore. Bond's fictional contexts are life-and-death conflicts against international military or global criminal enemies: both situations in which the spy's or government's right to whatever knowledge or advantage is being sought is not in question, and extreme subterfuge (as well as violence) are justified. Hostile foreign powers, and murderous criminal organisations, don't in that sense (and certainly not in spy fiction) have much right to privacy.

But protest and pressure groups, being citizens of this country and subject to its laws, do have such a right. The government and its agencies could ask such groups and their individual members for the information they seek, but can't legally or openly demand it.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

10 Greatest British Ensembles In Film History

With the much anticipated release of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in theatres today, WhatCulture! were challenged with coming up with our 10 best British ensemble casts. With Tinker’s all star British cast – including the likes of Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, John Hurt, Tom Hardy, Mark Strong and Benedict Cumberbatch – it was a bloody hard challenge to come up with ten that could even come close to rivalling such a solid cast!

Read on to discover what we came up with!

10. Gosford Park (2001)

The murder mystery genre is always one that employs a vast and impressive ensemble cast and Gosford Park is a prime example of how effective a film can be when this is done proficiently. A range of talented British stars fill the screen, disclosing the everyday workings of a 1930s mansion house from the privileged inhabitants and their wealthy guests, right down to the most invisible of servants.
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Are These The Top 100 Comedies Of All Time?

Are These The Top 100 Comedies Of All Time?
From time to time, major organizations such as the AFI give us lists of the best movies of all time. There's some kind of grand countdown from 100 to 1 and then we debate for a few days over how low this one was ranked or why was another ranked too high. And most of the time, we rarely get a glimpse behind the process. Time Out London has just released their list of the 100 Best Comedies Of All Time but have done it in a fun and uniquely transparent way. They surveyed over 200 people who work in, with, or around comedy and asked them for their top tens. Then they averaged all those lists together to come up with the top 100. The best part, though, is that all the lists are public. So instead of just listing the 100 best comedies of all time, we can also find out which ten comedies
See full article at Slash Film »

How altered aspect ratios on TV ruin feature films

The alteration of a film’s aspect ratio for its TV presentation is a common yet infuriating occurrence. Nick explains just how much it affects the movies we watch…

British television despises films, it seems. Every day, UK channels alter the very shape of the movies we watch, otherwise known as their aspect ratio.

Old films that are almost square will often have the top and bottom cut off to fit the shape of modern 16:9 screens – The Ladykillers, screened this month, is but one example. Big films shot in Panavision (Master And Commander, for example) will frequently have the left and right hand portions of the image cropped for the same purpose.

Editing the original shape of a film was just about forgivable in the days of 4:3 televisions. With big, high definition, modern screens, it’s contemptible. It changes the director and cinematographer’s original vision, and results
See full article at Den of Geek »

Obit: Peter Rogers, Produced 'Carry On' Series

By Wrap Staff

Peter Rogers, producer of the popular British "Carry On" films, has died. He was 95.

Rogers died Tuesday at his home in Gerrards Cross, northwest of London.

He produced all 31 of the innuendo-laden "Carry On" films, beginning with "Carry On Sergeant" in 1958 and including "Carry On Nurse" and "Carry On Doctor," which featured leering references to breasts and bottoms. He continued at Pinewood Studios until early this y...
See full article at The Wrap »

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