IMDb > Camelot (1967)
Camelot
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Camelot (1967) More at IMDbPro »

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Camelot -- The story of the marriage of England's King Arthur to Guinevere is played out amid the pagentry of Camelot...
Camelot -- US Home Video Trailer from Warner Bros.

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   4,172 votes »
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Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Alan Jay Lerner (based on the play "Camelot" book by)
T.H. White (from "The Once and Future King")
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Camelot on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 October 1967 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
The Most Beautiful Love Story Ever! See more »
Plot:
The story of the marriage of England's King Arthur to Guinevere. The plot of illegitimate Modred to gain the throne and Guinevere's growing attachment to Sir Lancelot, threaten to topple Arthur and destroy his "round table" of knights. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 3 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 6 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(67 articles)
The Once And Future King dramatisation coming to BBC R4
 (From Den of Geek. 8 October 2014, 7:04 AM, PDT)

R.I.P. Lauren Bacall, Sultry Star Of Stage And Screens
 (From Deadline New York. 14 August 2014, 7:18 AM, PDT)

Pinewood posts strong year
 (From ScreenDaily. 26 June 2014, 3:56 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
A bit muddled in the execution, but saved by the marvellous music! See more (84 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Richard Harris ... King Arthur

Vanessa Redgrave ... Guenevere

Franco Nero ... Lancelot Du Lac

David Hemmings ... Mordred

Lionel Jeffries ... King Pellinore
Laurence Naismith ... Merlyn
Pierre Olaf ... Dap

Estelle Winwood ... Lady Clarinda
Gary Marshal ... Sir Lionel
Anthony Rogers ... Sir Dinadan
Peter Bromilow ... Sir Sagramore
Sue Casey ... Lady Sybil
Gary Marsh ... Tom of Warwick
Nicolas Beauvy ... King Arthur as a Boy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Fredric Abbott ... Sir Geoffrey (uncredited)
Leon Greene ... Sir Turloc (uncredited)
Lars Hensen ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Michael Kilgarriff ... Sir Paul (uncredited)
Christopher Riordan ... Serf at Execution (uncredited)

Directed by
Joshua Logan 
 
Writing credits
Alan Jay Lerner (based on the play "Camelot" book by)

T.H. White (from "The Once and Future King")

Alan Jay Lerner (screenplay)

Produced by
Jack L. Warner .... producer
Joel Freeman .... associate producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Richard H. Kline (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Folmar Blangsted 
 
Production Design by
John Truscott 
Edward Carrere (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Edward Carrere 
 
Set Decoration by
John Brown  (as John W. Brown)
 
Costume Design by
John Truscott 
 
Makeup Department
Gordon Bau .... makeup supervisor
Jean Burt Reilly .... supervising hair stylist
 
Production Management
Joel Freeman .... production supervisor (uncredited)
Tadeo Villalba .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Arthur Jacobson .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Edward Carrere .... sets
John Truscott .... scenery designer
John Barton .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Craig Binkley .... set dresser (uncredited)
Ward Preston .... set designer (uncredited)
José María Tapiador .... assistant set decorator (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
M.A. Merrick .... sound (as M.A.Merrick)
Dan Wallin .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Johnny Borgese .... special effects (uncredited)
Chief .... leather shop foreman (uncredited)
Charles E. Dolan .... prop shop: leather work (uncredited)
Stanford Overbay .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
Robie Robinson .... special effects supervisor (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Joe Canutt .... stunts (uncredited)
Tap Canutt .... stunts (uncredited)
Paula Dell .... stunts (uncredited)
Tom Dittman .... stunts (uncredited)
Lee Faulkner .... stunts (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
Roy Jenson .... stunts (uncredited)
Russ McCubbin .... stunts (uncredited)
Hal Needham .... stunts (uncredited)
George Orrison .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Paul Jacobsen .... electrician (uncredited)
Robert Jason .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Haleen K. Holt .... costume illustrator (uncredited)
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
Andrea E. Weaver .... costumer: women (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Ken Darby .... music associate
Jack Hayes .... orchestrator
Pete King .... orchestrator
Alan Jay Lerner .... lyrics by
Frederick Loewe .... music by
Alfred Newman .... conductor
Alfred Newman .... music supervisor
Trude Rittman .... music liaison
Buddy Schwab .... musical staging associate
Leo Shuken .... orchestrator
Carl Fortina .... musician: accordion soloist (uncredited)
Gus Levene .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Gene Merlino .... singing voice: Lancelot Du Lac (uncredited)
Albert Sendrey .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Joel Freeman .... assistant to producer
Moss Hart .... based on the play "Camelot" directed by
Daniel Vandraegen .... speech consultant (as Dr. Daniel Vandraegen)
Wayne Fitzgerald .... title designer (uncredited)
Crayton Smith .... script supervisor trainee (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
179 min | Canada:175 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
4-Track Stereo (35 mm prints) | 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Marianne Faithfull, Liza Minnelli and Petula Clark were considered for the role of Guinevere.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Lancelot is singing the song "If Ever I Should Leave You," Lancelot and Guenevere are seen lying on the ground holding hands, in the next shot Lancelot is holding her other hand and his arm is under her neck.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
A Knight:The rules of battle are not for Lancelot Du Lac, Your Majesty! Let us attack now while they sleep!
King Arthur:[firmly] We will attack when I give the command - at dawn.
[the knight leaves, and Arthur begins to talk to himself]
King Arthur:Oh, Merlyn, Merlyn, why is Ginny in that castle, behind walls I cannot enter? How did I blunder into this agonizing absurdity? Where did I stumble? How did I go wrong? Should I not have loved her?
[sighs]
King Arthur:Then I should not have been born! Oh, Merlyn, I haven't got much time. Within an inch of sunlight, the arrows begin to fly. If I am to die in battle, please, please do not let me die bewildered!
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
How to Handle A WomanSee more »

FAQ

What other movies have been made about the triangle between Arthur, Lancelot, and Guinevere?
How does the movie end?
Was Richard Harris and Vanessa Redgrave's singing dubbed?
See more »
24 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
A bit muddled in the execution, but saved by the marvellous music!, 22 October 2002
Author: gaityr from United Kingdom

CAMELOT is, of course, the story of King Arthur (Richard Harris), his Queen, Guenevere (Vanessa Redgrave), and Sir Lancelot (Franco Nero), the best and brightest knight of Arthur's treasured Round Table. To Arthur's infinite sorrow, his queen and love falls hard--irrevocably so--for his friend and ally, and he is forced to choose between indulging the hatred that overwhelms him as a man, and the nobility that accompanies his stature as a king. Choosing the latter, Arthur must live with the whispers of 'poison in the court' as the other knights bristle at Lancelot's stolen kisses with Guenevere. All this while the king clings to his flame of hope, the idea of establishing a civil court to establish law and order where once there was violence and bloodshed. When Arthur's illegitimate son Mordred (David Hemmings) devises a plan to get Arthur out of the castle and the knights into Guenevere's room to trap the clandestine lovers, 'Jenny' and 'Lance' are found out... even as they're pledging to part in order to honour their love and loyalty to Arthur. The eventual demise of each of the three main characters, which I'm emphatically *not* going to reveal but you might suspect anyway if you know any Arthurian folklore, is heartrending and quite well played-out.

'Tis a tale rich in ironies, this tale of Camelot, and in the end a story about two ideas--that of an ideal i.e. the peaceful lawful Camelot as envisioned by Arthur, and that of love. Neither are 'real' in the sense of being tangible, can't be seen or felt or heard, and yet both are worth fighting to the death for. They can bring a king to his knees, but they can also make heroes of men. It's a shame that the film doesn't do handle this too well; whenever it sets out to do so, it becomes a tad overdone. Take for example the quandary Arthur finds himself in--should he turn a blind eye to the adulterous pair's trysts? Arthur's dilemma is expressed by a soliloquy superbly delivered by Harris. It's a great piece of acting and a solid writing job--it's just not something that works on film, even in a musical (when one is more inclined to accepting an actor directly addressing or serenading the camera than with other film genres). The point is made *too* overtly, and the film and characters suffer as a result.

It probably isn't helped by the fact that the majority of the lush, beautiful shots in the film (see the 'Lusty Month Of May' number) are marred by some equally jarring shots that seem completely out of place, or just wrong. During the montage of shots to Nero's solo 'If Ever I Would Leave You', there is one sequence in which Guenevere enters Lancelot's room--it would make a perfectly lovely shot if done in an understated fashion, making the point that it is Guenevere who comes to Lancelot and not (always) the other way around. Unfortunately, in an attempt to create 'romance' (something that doesn't need overt manufacturing if the actors are capable of generating that atmosphere sans special effects), both actors are subjected to a wind machine, and end up looking like the melodramatic lover-idiots of a Mills & Boon dramatisation. Arthur's chat with young Tom as well is great in the conception, and suffers in the execution--something is lacking from that scene (I think the ability to underact by Gary Marsh as the boy), and it spoils what would otherwise be a great message and ending. (The too many 'Run, boy, run!'s also wears on the nerves after a while.) CAMELOT is caught uncomfortably between being a stage production and a film, and that shows in how it rigidly keeps to the 'Overture/Intermission/Entr'Acte/Ending Music' structure... while *annoucing* it with captions!

Whatever problems there might be with direction and execution, however, there can be no faulting of the score and songs written with the distinctive stamp of songwriting team Lerner and Loewe. Every song has its own charm, but I particularly enjoyed 'Camelot' (a sweet and fitting theme tune for the love between Arthur and Guenevere, and Arthur and his kingdom); 'Then You May Take Me To The Fair' (Guenevere's deviousness put to glorious song); and 'If Ever I Would Love You' (with smashing lyrics but spoilt somewhat by Nero). The actors, or at least the two leads Harris and Redgrave, do a creditable job by these songs... Harris in particular. He is consummately King Arthur, the vulnerable man and the noble king, and he brings the character off (dodgy blue eyeshadow or no!). The role of Guenevere is a tough one to make sympathetic, and even now I don't know whether I like her... but I do know that Redgrave did as good a job as can be expected with a woman who falls *instantly*( in love with her husband's best friend after trying her best to get him killed in (not one but three!) jousts. Neither Harris nor Redgrave are singers by profession, and it's rather a shame that Julie Andrews (who created the role of Guenevere on Broadway) didn't reprise her role for the film, but neither of them hinder the beauty of the Lerner/Loewe music. I'm afraid the same can't be said of Nero, whom I thought annoying as the puffed-up prat Lancelot. Watch and you'll notice that he emotes, in between a bad attempt at a French accent, by flaring his nostrils. Hardly attractive, especially in close-up!

CAMELOT is far from a perfect film or even a perfect musical. (That adjective can probably be applied only to the score, and that has nothing specifically to do with the film.) It would have been interesting to see it onstage, or to have the main Broadway cast reprise their roles in this version--yet the film *does* have its own quaint charm. The costumes are breathtaking, for certain, and Harris really works very very hard at trying to make the film one worth seeing. For his performance, despite the rest of the film and the uneven writing for his character, it almost *is* worth it. And I cannot deny that the ending still made me cry. So don't take it from me alone that CAMELOT isn't a great film--there *are* many things about it to like. But be warned that liking it, as I do, doesn't translate into loving it. 7.5/10

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