The Taming of the Shrew (1967) - News Poster

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The Furniture: Matte Paintings at the End of an Era

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Over the course of the past year, I’ve done an informal retrospective series on the Best Production Design nominees of 1967. It isn’t an especially “New Hollywood” lineup, despite being the year of “Pictures at a Revolution.” Four of the nominees are lush period pieces, three of them lengthy musicals. They often feel like extravagantly-designed chaos, whirlwinds of sets and props that spin out of control. This is true of both the hilarious brawls of The Taming of the Shrew and the dated, stereotype-laden adventures of Thoroughly Modern Millie. Camelot, the winner, manages to split the difference between Old Hollywood excess and New Hollywood sexuality.

The final two films, both Best Picture nominees, are a bit less of a thrill. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and Doctor Dolittle are,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Pericles: Born in a Tempest

Pericles: Born in a Tempest Conceived and directed by Jordan Reeves Presented by Hunger and Thirst Theatre with the Guerrilla Shakespeare Project at the West End Theatre, NYC November 2-18, 2017

If you have ever dreamed of watching Batman fight in the midst of a Shakespeare production, now is your chance to make that fantasy a reality. How fantasy in the form of storytelling (Batman included) intertwines with our lived realities partly drives Jordan Reeves' imaginative adaptation of Shakespeare's Pericles. Reeves' Pericles: Born in a Tempest both streamlines the sprawling original and weaves in a modern framing narrative in which the Shakespearean text becomes a book, The True Tales of Pericles, given to a woman by her recently deceased father. Of course, Shakespeare, arguably with a collaborator, was himself adapting a well-known medieval romance, the tale of Apollonius of Tyre, primarily the version set down by John Gower in his fourteenth-century
See full article at CultureCatch »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “10 Things I Hate About You”

The film was actually a very loose adaptation of William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, and did in fact reference Shakespeare and the play several times throughout the film. As a romantic comedy it was a fairly big hit and it’s become a cult classic since. A lot of teens actually grew up to this movie and could easily relate to and enjoy they characters that were more or less immortalized in pop culture. Here are a few things you might not know though. 10. The film’s title was inspired by one of the screenwriters. One of the screenwriters

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “10 Things I Hate About You”
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘Burton to This Taylor’: Inside the Epic Hollywood Love Story Taylor Swift References in 'Ready For It?'

‘Burton to This Taylor’: Inside the Epic Hollywood Love Story Taylor Swift References in 'Ready For It?'
In her latest single, Taylor Swift harkens back to one of Hollywood’s most epic love stories — for good reason.

The Grammy winning singer recently released her new song “…Ready For It?” — an upbeat track driven by a dominating baseline and seemingly filled with adoring references to her new love, Joe Alwyn.

But the one line that stands out the most comes at the top of the second verse when Swift compares their relationship to Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor‘s legendary love.

“He can be my jailor/Burton to this Taylor/Every love I’ve known in comparison is a failure,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Furniture Index

Can we have a random break for applause for Daniel Walber's The Furniture column. It was Daniel's birthday this weekend so he has the day off. He's already 69 episodes in to this incredible series which has been filled with sharp insights, a keen eye, and rich Hollywood anecdotes. Here's everything he's covered thus far. Please show your love in the comments if you look forward to these each Monday.

The Forties and Fifties

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Bored at the border

How Green Was My Valley (1941) Designing dignity

That Hamilton Woman (1941) High ceilings

• Captain of the Clouds (1942) A Canadian air show

• The Magnificent Andersons (1942) Victorian Palace / Manifest Destiny

My Gal Sal (1942) Nonsense Gay Nineties

The Shanghai Gesture (1942) Appropriating Chinese design

Black Narcissus (1947) Mad for matte paintings

David and Bathsheba (1951) A humble palace of moral struggle

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Decorative madness

My Cousin Rachel (1952) Ghosts of property

Lust for Life
See full article at FilmExperience »

All-Female Shakespeare Stage Trilogy to Receive UK Theatrical Release

Phyllida Lloyd’s “Julius Caesar”: donmarwarehouse.com/Helen Maybanks

Filmed versions of Phyllida Lloyd’s all-women productions of Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar,” “Henry IV,” and “The Tempest” are receiving theatrical releases in the UK. According to The Stage, “Julius Caesar” will premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival (Eiff) this month before hitting theaters nationwide July 12. The other two installments of the all-female Shakespeare trilogy will open later in 2017.

Directed by Lloyd and starring Harriet Walter (“The Crown,”), “each of the plays in the trilogy is set in a woman’s prison, with performers adopting the roles of prisoners in a drama group,” the source details.

The trilogy began with “Julius Caesar’s” 2012 bow at London’s Donmar Warehouse. “Henry IV” debuted at the Donmar in 2014 and “The Tempest” premiered at King’s Cross Theatre in 2016. “The three productions were filmed live during a run at a purpose-built theater near King’s Cross in London, where the trilogy played in repertory last year,” The Stage writes.

“The all-female, ethnically diverse cast asks the question: ‘Why are these people usually barred from performing the work of our national playwright?’” Walter explained. “We hope to redress a huge gender imbalance both in our drama and in public life and hold Shakespeare’s mirror up to a more current world.”

Lloyd — who also directed an all-female production of “The Taming of the Shrew” in 2016 — stated, “The whole mission was to represent those who felt they had no stake in our culture and the screen version tries to capture their fury and passion. To take the viewer where they could never get to while sitting in the theatre, even as it was unfolding live.”

It’s encouraging to see talented women like Lloyd and Walter reclaim and rework roles originally written for men — especially in works as revered as Shakespeare’s. Helen Mirren, who took on the traditionally-male role of Prospero in Julie Taymor’s “The Tempest,” has spoken out about the need for women to take on interesting projects even if they were originally intended for men. “As you get older, even the Shakespeare roles become [less substantial for older women] — that’s why we have to start stealing the men’s roles — doing like I did in ‘The Tempest,’ [by changing the role of Prospero to] Prospera,” she said.

Mirren is right — really, when is she ever wrong? — but Hollywood shouldn’t use her turn as Prospero and Walter’s turns in the trilogy to justify the lack of substantial roles for women. While it’s fun to see women take on characters originally written for men, it would be even better if good projects and roles designed for women were just the norm.

Check out the trailer for Lloyd’s “Julius Caesar” below. The film is currently up for best British feature film at this year’s Eiff. Walter is nominated for best performance in a British feature film as well.

Go to the Donmar’s website for showtimes and additional information.

https://medium.com/media/e3ba5318bd4898c991062f75953d4e74/href

All-Female Shakespeare Stage Trilogy to Receive UK Theatrical Release was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Ron Berkeley, Makeup Artist on Richard Burton Films, Dies at 86

Ron Berkeley, an Emmy-winning makeup artist who worked with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor on such films as Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Taming of the Shrew, has died. He was 86.

Berkeley died May 9 at the Motion Picture & Television Country Home in Woodland Hills, his family announced.

Berkeley was Burton's makeup guy on about two dozen projects, also including Staircase (1969), Bluebeard (1972), Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), Equus (1977), The Wild Geese (1978) and the 1980s TV series Wagner.

In addition to Who's...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Ron Berkeley, Makeup Artist on Richard Burton Films, Dies at 86

Ron Berkeley, an Emmy-winning makeup artist who worked with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor on such films as Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Taming of the Shrew, has died. He was 86.

Berkeley died May 9 at the Motion Picture & Television Country Home in Woodland Hills, his family announced.

Berkeley was Burton's makeup guy on about two dozen projects, also including Staircase (1969), Bluebeard (1972), Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), Equus (1977), The Wild Geese (1978) and the 1980s TV series Wagner.

In addition to Who's...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

'I Am Heath Ledger': 10 Things We Learned From Spike TV Doc

'I Am Heath Ledger': 10 Things We Learned From Spike TV Doc
"I'm not supposed to be talking about this with you. This is not something that is supposed to be happening right now," musician Ben Harper says at the beginning of the new Spike TV documentary I Am Heath Ledger. "Some people are just bigger than the world has room for."

Harper, a close friend of the actor who died in 2008 of an accidental drug overdose, is one of several friends, peers and family members who discuss both the actor's singular talents and constant search for adventure and creative pursuits. The poignant film,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Is It Time for a 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend' Emmy?

  • Yidio
2017-04-05T04:47:54-07:00Is It Time for a 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend' Emmy?

She may have sung a sendup of "Rose's Turn" in the season one finale of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, but it's season two that should cement it as Donna's turn. By Donna, we mean Donna Lynne Champlin, an actress who has defied convention and smashed stereotypes while playing Paula Proctor in the musical TV show on the CW. GoldDerby reported that Champlin will be submitted for consideration for a best supporting actress Emmy nomination, and we think it's about time the veteran actress get her first major TV award.

Champlin, who has acted onstage in James Joyce's The Dead, Sweeney Todd, Billy Elliot and The Taming of the Shrew, among other productions, also made appearances in Law & Order, The Good Wife and Younger. Playing Paula on Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has propelled her into a major
See full article at Yidio »

Latanya Richardson Jackson Looks Back on Her Long Career

Latanya Richardson Jackson’s career is about hard work and continuity. Last year, she appeared in “The Taming of the Shrew” at the Public Theatre, a relationship that began in the 1970s. And this month marks the 40th anniversary of her first mention in Variety, when she was cast in “Perdido (Lost),” a play by Soledad at the Henry Street Settlement. She has directed and acted in numerous productions at the Lower East Side site for social services and arts.

Richardson started acting as a teen in Atlanta, where she also met her future husband, Samuel L. Jackson. They’ve been together 47 years. Richardson was Tony-nominated for the 2014 revival of “A Raisin in the Sun” with Denzel Washington. This month, she concludes her guest arc on “Grey’s Anatomy,” as the mother of Maggie (Kelly McCreary).

Next up for Richardson Jackson: More work with the philanthropic Samuel L. & Latanya R. Jackson Foundation, more
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Furniture: A Tarot Reading with "The Love Witch"

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in much more magnified detail. Here's Daniel Walber...

Over the last year, I’ve written about a fair number films in which the costume design and production design are intimate companions. The Taming of the Shrew is the most recent example, a visual cornucopia that underlines Zeffirelli’s tendency to paint people and props with the same brush. Yet that flamboyant director was not actually the credited costume designer or production designer. His style, like that of most filmmakers, was the result of artistic collaboration.

Not so for The Love Witch, a much more literal “singular vision.” Director Anna Biller worked as both production designer and costume designer for her film, as well as art director, set decorator, editor, composer, writer and producer. The film’s strikingly unified aesthetic certainly can be attributed to this herculean labor,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Relaunched Quad Cinema to Host Lina Wertmüller Retrospective

Lina Wertmüller in “Behind White Glasses”

Italian filmmaker Lina Wertmüller made history as the first woman to receive an Academy Award for Best Director back in 1977 for “Seven Beauties.” The trailblazer’s prolific career will be celebrated with “Female Trouble,” an upcoming retrospective held at the relaunched Quad Cinema in New York. Screenings will include “Seven Beauties,” world premieres of new restorations from Kino Lorber, rare imported 35mm prints, and “Behind White Glasses,” Valerio Ruiz’s documentary about Wertmüller’s life and career.

“In the 1970s, Lina Wertmüller was a certifiable international phenomenon — a lively firebrand behind white glasses who became one of the decade’s marquee-name filmmakers,” a press release for the event details. “Her hot-button, epically-titled movies — erotic and polemical and provocative all at once — became must-see conversation pieces and smashed American box-office records for foreign-language films.”

Female Trouble” will include screenings of “Swept Away,” Wertmüller’s update of Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew,” “A Night Full of Rain,” her English-language debut, and “Summer Night,” a Sardinia-set comedy that tackles bondage and voyeurism.

“This series finally offers the opportunity to dive into the history of this extraordinary director, an aesthetic pioneer and a crucial trailblazer in a male-dominated industry,” the event’s press release emphasizes.

Female Trouble” runs from April 14-April 30. Check out the titles screening below, courtesy of Quad Cinema. More information will be available on the theater’s website.

Swept Away (Travolti da un insolito destino nell’azzurro mare d’agosto)

Lina Wertmüller, 1974, Italy, 116m, Dcp

Special weeklong revival engagement begins April 21

For her kinky update of The Taming of the Shrew, Wertmüller reteams gorgeous green-eyed muses Mariangela Melato and Giancarlo Giannini as a vacationing society dame and her Communist servant locked in the ultimate battle of the sexes (and classes) once stranded together on a deserted island. Never mind the unfortunate Madonna remake — this bracing, sexy, riotous political fable, one of the most argued-about films of the 1970s, has to be seen to be believed. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Seven Beauties (Pasqualino Settebellezze)

Lina Wertmüller, 1975, Italy, 115m, Dcp

Special weeklong revival engagement begins April 21

Under fascism, there are no limits to sacrificing one’s honor — and in Wertmüller’s outrageous picaresque, comedy and tragedy are indistinguishable. When city hustler Giancarlo Giannini accidentally murders the lover of one of his seven sisters, a series of mishaps land him in a concentration camp, where he must seduce the homely Nazi commandant to stay alive. Controversial in its day, the film led Wertmüller to become the first woman nominated for a Best Director Oscar. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

“A handbook for survival, a farce, a drama of almost shattering impact. It’s a disorderly epic, seductively beautiful to look at, as often harrowing as it is boisterously funny.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Behind the White Glasses

Valerio Ruiz, Italy, 112m, Dcp

Special weeklong engagement opens April 21

This definitive documentary traces the incredible life of Lina Wertmüller, from her start as a tenacious Fellini assistant to her meteoric rise as a global superstar. The vivacious and fabulous 88-year-old filmmaker recounts the saga of her marriage to designer-collaborator Enrico Job, shows off her trademark eyewear collection, and even sings. Giancarlo Giannini, Sophia Loren, Rutger Hauer, and Martin Scorsese give revealing interviews for this loving portrait, which offers a corrective to decades of critical neglect. Official selection: Venice Film Festival. A Kino Lorber release. In English and Italian with English subtitles.

Director Valerio Ruiz in person at select shows opening weekend. A Kino Lorber release.

“Must-viewing for film buffs.” — The Hollywood Reporter

All Screwed Up (Tutto a posto e niente in ordine)

Lina Wertmüller, 1974, Italy, 105m, Dcp

In Milan, a bawdy group of Sicilian migrants meet-cute and move into a commune together, while they struggle to keep their livelihood — and hold their libidos in check. Wertmüller’s polyphonic farce, with its large ensemble and earworm theme music, helped to further establish her ongoing fascination with the struggles and shenanigans of Italy’s working class. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Breathtaking…exuberantly funny. Watching All Screwed Up is to be witness to a giant talent.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Blood Feud (Fatto di sangue fra due uomini per causa di una vedova. Si sospettano moventi politici)

Lina Wertmüller, 1987, Italy, 124m, 35mm

The always-ravishing Sophia Loren stars as a Sicilian widow who loses her husband to the Mafia. Setting out to avenge his death, she becomes entangled in a lurid love triangle along the way, her smitten suitors played by Giancarlo Giannini and Marcello Mastroianni. Lust, revenge, and violence reign supreme in this steamy WWII-set thriller. In Italian with English subtitles.

8 ½

Federico Fellini, 1963, Italy, 138m, 35mm

After her old school friend Flora Carabella married Marcello

Mastroianni, Wertmüller met Fellini and won an apprenticeship on

his seminal portrait of creative crisis. She helped the maestro cast extras

(including her own mother) but Wertmüller didn’t remain an assistant for

long: the same year Fellini helped her secure financing and

cinematographer Gianni Di Venanzo to shoot The Lizards.

In Italian with English subtitles.

Ferdinando e Carolina

Lina Wertmüller, 1999, Italy, 102m, Dcp

One of Wertmüller’s handsomest productions, detailing the life (and death) of King Ferdinand of Naples, here dramatized as another of her sex-crazed heroes. He reminisces of his days as a young philanderer, lamenting his impending marriage to 16-year-old Carolina of Austria — until they discover their shared taste for libertine pleasures. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Let’s Talk About Men (Questa volta parliamo di uomini)

Lina Wertmüller, 1965, Italy, 91m, 35mm

Wertmüller’s controversial sexual politics are already in full effect in this early episodic farce. A sassy response to Ettore Scola’s Let’s Talk About Women, the film is told as four independent stories — each more outlandish than the next. Brace yourselves for some unconventional solutions to marital discord, including kleptomania and knife-throwing. In Italian with English subtitles.

The Lizards (I basilischi)

Lina Wertmüller, 1963, Italy, 85m, 35mm

Using experience gained as an assistant director on 8 ½ (and using some of Fellini’s crew), Wertmüller made a debut that feels like a direct response to her mentor’s I Vitelloni: a compassionate snapshot of small town coming-of-age, Italian style. But Wertmüller’s treatment, shot for only $60,000, features a style and energy all her own, plus a Morricone score. In Italian with English subtitles.

Love & Anarchy (Film d’amore e d’anarchia, ovvero ‘stamattina alle 10 in via dei Fiori nella nota casa di tolleranza…)

Lina Wertmüller, 1973, Italy, 129m, Dcp

Silk robes and bare breasts abound in this tragicomedy of epic proportions set in a brothel pre-wwii. Freckle-faced ingénue Giancarlo Giannini comes to Rome on a mission to kill Mussolini with the help of politically active prostitute Mariangela Melato. But love gets in the way of anarchy when he falls for one of her fellow ladies of the night. In Italian with English subtitles. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Executed with the high-pitched passion of a gothic romance with a fluid, whirling, dazzling energy.” — Newsweek

A Night Full of Rain (La fine del mondo nel nostro solito letto in una notte piena di pioggia)

Lina Wertmüller, 1978, Italy/Canada, 104m, 35mm

Cocksure Communist journalist Giancarlo Giannini elopes with feminist photographer Candice Bergen in Wertmüller’s English-language debut. With no shortage of furtive lovemaking amid endless close-ups of its ever alluring leads, Giuseppe Rotunno’s camera works overtime to provide some of the most lavish imagery of the director’s career.

The Seduction of Mimi (Mimì metallurgico ferito nell’onore)

Lina Wertmüller, 1972, Italy, 112m, Dcp

A wistful romance turned raunchy comedy, this searing take on sexual and political double standards finds laborer Giancarlo Giannini ricocheting between mafiosos and comrades — as well as between his apparently frigid wife and beguiling mistress (Mariangela Melato). In Wertmüller’s world, the bedroom is the only appropriate battleground for revenge — for men and women alike. In Italian with English subtitles.

A Kino Lorber release.

“Rollicking fun.” — Judith Crist, New York

Sotto…Sotto (Sotto… sotto… strapazzato da anomala passione)

Lina Wertmüller, 1984, Italy, 105m, 35mm

A stroll through a sculpture garden inspires a bored housewife to pursue a love affair with her girlfriend, in the spirit of the romantic thrill of her beloved movie melodramas; but her homophobic carpenter husband flies into an increasingly desperate rage as he tries to uncover his wife’s lover. In Italian with English subtitles.

Summer Night (Notte d’estate con profilo greco, occhi a mandorla e odore di basilico)

Lina Wertmüller, 1986, Italy, 94m, Dcp

Even by Wertmüller’s standards this outrageous ’80s companion to Swept Away offers up a particularly impressive menu of sexual perversions, from voyeurism to bondage, plus a severed finger. A Valentino-clad Mariangela Melato plays an especially entitled aristocrat who holds an infamous kidnapper (Michele Placido) hostage for ransom — and animalistic fun — in her gothic palace in remote Sardinia. In Italian with English subtitles.

World premiere of new 2K digital restoration. A Kino Lorber release.

Relaunched Quad Cinema to Host Lina Wertmüller Retrospective was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Furniture: A Scenery Buffet for the Battling Burtons

Editor's Note: "The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. We strongly suggest going forward that you click on the images to see them in their more detailed large glory. Many older films were of course designed for giant screens, not thinking of their eventual home as phones or small TV set.

by Daniel Walber

Franco Zeffirelli is not a man of subtle tastes. When he’s lucky, his opulent excesses achieve camp status. But when he’s not, it rolls over the audience like an 18-wheeler full of circus elephants. This has generally been the rule for his theatrical productions, some of which have nonetheless become war horse mainstays at major opera companies.

And so it may come as something of a surprise that the director’s overzealous artistic passion actually works quite brilliantly in his film version of The Taming of the Shrew, which opened 50 years ago this week.
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Othello’ Theater Review: David Oyelowo, Daniel Craig Go to War

  • The Wrap
‘Othello’ Theater Review: David Oyelowo, Daniel Craig Go to War
It’s the year that New York caught up to Europe when it comes to radical interpretations of the classics. On stage in 2016, there was Phyllida Lloyd’s all-female “The Taming of the Shrew,” set at a Trump-produced beauty pageant; Ivo van Hove’s “The Crucible,” set in a classroom; and at the Met, Mariusz Trelinski’s “Tristan und Isolde,” set on a warship. No surprise, all those directors are European, and, for better or worse, their names tended to dominate reviews of the respective productions. Shakespeare, Miller, and Wagner are only writers, after all. Sam Gold, an American, joins this hip-directors foray.
See full article at The Wrap »

The odd disappearance of the 10 Things I Hate About You follow-up

Simon Brew Nov 24, 2016

10 Things I Hate About Life starting filming in 2012. Four years later, it's disappeared. What's happened?

1999’s 10 Things I Hate About You was one of the prize picks from a rich selection of teen movies of that particular era. Loosely based on William Shakespeare’s The Taming Of The Shrew, the movie starred Julia Stiles and the late Heath Ledger in its lead roles, with an impressive supporting cast including Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Allison Janney and Larisa Oleynik.

It was, in hindsight, a modest box office success, bringing in just over $50m off a $30m budget. But for those schooled on 1990s teen cinema, 10 Things I Hate About You is regularly cited as a favourite. With good reason, too: it’s a very good film, that’s stood the test of time well. It’s also one more reason why the world misses Heath Ledger.

The film’s director,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Exclusive interview with actor Richard Tyson

david j. moore chats with actor Richard Tyson

A busy actor since making his auspicious cinematic debut as perhaps the greatest movie bully of all time in Three O’clock High (1988), Richard Tyson always makes an impression when you see him on screen. He’s done everything from sexy and suave (Two Moon Junction, 1988) to being the bad guy (Kindergarten Cop, 1990), and he’s also done comedy in three different Farrelly Brothers pictures (Kingpin, 1996, There’s Something About Mary, 1998, and Me, Myself, and Irene, 2000). He’s been extremely active as a character actor in notable films like Battlefield Earth (2000), Black Hawk Down (2001), and different horror films such as Big Bad Wolf (2006) and 2015’s Bound to Vengeance, which casts him against type. Tyson, who’s done extensive work in theater, has run the gamut of acting, and he’s never stopped working since his humble beginnings as a kid from Mobile,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

George Sidney Centennial: "Kiss Me Kate"

by Tim Brayton

Our centennial tribute to MGM mainstay George Sidney continues with the director's 1953 musical Kiss Me Kate, and such a curious beast it is. Adapted with a slightly free hand from Cole Porter's hit 1948 musical, it's a musical version of The Taming of the Shrew that's also a backstage comedy about the staging of a musical version of The Taming of the Shrew, in which the actors playing Kate and Petruchio are recently feuding exes.

Don't let the plot worry you, though. Since this is a 1950s MGM musical the focus is obviously one one thing first and foremost, and that's big, heaving Spectacle.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jenji Kohan’s Netflix Wrestling Comedy ‘G.L.O.W.’ Casts Gayle Rankin (Exclusive)

Jenji Kohan’s Netflix Wrestling Comedy ‘G.L.O.W.’ Casts Gayle Rankin (Exclusive)
Gayle Rankin has been cast in Netflix’s upcoming comedy series “G.L.O.W.,” Variety has learned.

The show, from “Orange Is the New Black” creator Jenji Kohan, is based on the 1980s professional wrestling league Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. Rankin will play wrestler Sheila the She Wolf, starring opposite Alison Brie, who was cast in August.

Rankin most recently played Bianca in the Public Theater’s production of “The Taming of the Shrew” in New York. She can next be seen in director Noah Baumbach’s upcoming movie “The Meyerowitz Tales.” Originally from Scotland, she had previously been cast as a series regular in the HBO pilot “The Missionary.” She made her Off-Broadway debut in Tony Kushner’s adaptation of “The Illusion” at the Signature Theater Company and her Broadway debut as Fraulien Kost in the Roundabout Theater Company’s revival of “Cabaret,” alongside Michelle Williams and Alan Cumming.

G.L.O.W.” is inspired by the real-life stories of the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘The Good Wife’s Cush Jumbo Puts on A Really Good ‘Shrew’ – Review

In her first stage appearance since exchanging the boards for the sound stage as Julianna Margulies’ smart sidekick on the final season of The Good Wife, Cush Jumbo grumps, groans, grimaces, growls and glowers — man does she glower — under the sky in Phyllida Lloyd’s freewheeling feminist all-female revisal of The Taming of the Shrew at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. This startlingly good actress actress made her Broadway debut in the fall of 2014 as mysterious…
See full article at Deadline TV »
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