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Bedazzled (1967) Poster

(1967)

Trivia

An article about Peter Cook that appeared in the New Yorker stated that the filmmakers didn't have a title for Bedazzled (1967) when it was being made. Cook suggested calling the film Raquel Welch. The producers didn't understand why Cook would want to name the movie after an actress that only appears for a few minutes in it. Cook explained that movie marquees put the lead actors names over the movie title. Thus the letters on the marquee would say "Peter Cook and Dudley Moore in Raquel Welch". The producers ended up going for the more ordinary title.
Dudley Moore adopted the moniker Stanley Moon in this film after John Gielgud wrote him a letter of introduction because he was impressed with Moore's work in the stage revue "Beyond the Fringe". Gielgud obliviously referred to Moore as Stanley Moon in the letter, and an amused Moore adopted the name as an alter ego for the rest of his life. After they worked on Arthur (1981) and Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988) together, Gielgud good-naturedly said that he "got to know Stanley Moon rather well."
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George is always wearing red socks, even when he's a fly.
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After Stanley signs away his soul, Spigot files the form away under "M"; the other names he reads out from the files while finding Moon's place are Niccolò Machiavelli, Senator Joseph McCarthy, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Miller (presumably a reference to their Beyond the Fringe (1964) colleague Jonathan Miller) and Moses ("Irving Moses, the fruiterer").
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The book George tears the last page from (supposedly so the infuriated reader will never know whodunnit) is the 1966 Fontana Books printing of Agatha Christie's 1963 novel "The Clocks".
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At the time of its release, blasphemy was considered a common-law offense in the UK, and the British Board of Film Censors were concerned that the film's premise would offend religious groups. Stanley Donen defended the film against such claims. To prove his point, Donen claimed that he pre-screened "Bedazzled" to a London rector and the Arch Deacon of Westminster Abbey, both of whom took no offense to the film. After that assurance, the case was dropped. By 2005, standards about what could be considered blasphemous in Britain had been relaxed, that when the film was resubmitted to what was now called the British Board of Film Classification, the only problem they had was with a particular scene involving Stanley's hanging attempts, which had the potential to be considered a glamorous depiction of suicide (the solution was raising the film's previous "PG" rating to a "12").
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Peter Cook later recalled (with some astonishment) that Stanley Donen turned down the offer to direct Hello, Dolly! (1969) in order to make this movie.
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At its earlier stages of development in 1967, this was unimaginatively titled " The Sale "
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Although Raquel Welch is featured in most of the promotional material for this film, her character is only on screen for roughly no more than 7 minutes
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