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Elizabeth Baur, Actress on 'Ironside,' Dies at 69

Elizabeth Baur, who helped Raymond Burr bring the bad guys to justice as Officer Fran Belding on the long-running NBC crime drama Ironside, has died. She was 69.

Baur died Sept. 30 in Los Angeles following a lengthy illness, publicist Paul Gendreau announced.

On Ironside, which starred Burr as a San Francisco police consultant who solves crimes from his wheelchair, Baur effectively stepped in for Barbara Anderson (as Eve Whitfield), who exited the show after the fourth season.

Belding's character was introduced when she helped Robert Ironside and his team nab the gamblers who had murdered her father. Baur went...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

William Tepper Dies: Star Of Jack Nicholson’s ‘Drive, He Said’ Was 69

  • Deadline
William Tepper, who starred in Jack Nicholson’s directorial debut Drive, He Said and accompanied Nicholson to the 1971 Cannes Film Festival, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack. He was 69. Tepper’s death was confirmed by his manager Jon Klane. Tepper, known as Bill, also appeared in Bachelor Party (1984), the Richard Gere starrer Breathless (1983), and ’70s TV series including Kojak and Ironside. Tepper also wrote and produced the 2006 film Grilled, starring Ray…
See full article at Deadline »

13 TV Reboots That Should Have Been Booted (Photos)

  • The Wrap
13 TV Reboots That Should Have Been Booted (Photos)
After Fox revisited “The X-Files,” TheWrap looks at other TV reboots that never should’ve happened. “Charlie’s Angels” “Charlie’s Angels” perfectly captured the goofiness of the ’70s, but it felt painfully out of date in 2011. Critics and audiences agreed: It was canceled after three episodes. “IronsideBlair Underwood has done some memorable TV work, starting with his career-making role on “L.A. Law.” But his 2013 take on the Raymond Burr crime drama was yanked from NBC’s air even faster than you can say “Lax” or “The Event.” “The Bionic Woman” A 2007 take on the “Six Million Dollar Man” spinoff,
See full article at The Wrap »

Christopher Lombardo & Jeff Kirschner Give Their Diagnosis of Healthcare Horror Movies

  • DailyDead
[Guest authors Christopher Lombardo and Jeff Kirschner of Really Awful Movies share their diagnosis of healthcare horror movies with Daily Dead readers.] When the Us was overhauling its healthcare system, much to-do was made about so-called “death panels,” government committees who would decide who lives and dies based on asset allocation. As far as healthcare horrors are concerned, it turns out that playing God is very real, but luckily only in film and Sarah Palin’s fright-filled imagination. Nefarious nurses, murderous docs, and psychopathic hallway stalkers in horror movies have effectively put end-of-life issues at the forefront, but not in a way that can be reasonably debated: your life, their ending of it.

We’ve decided to weigh in on the healthcare hullabaloo by looking at fictional settings that make One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest look like the height of patient-centered thinking. So sit back and self-medicate with whatever’s in the fridge (or better still, the medicine cabinet) and take these seven healthcare horrors—but don’t call us in the morning.
See full article at DailyDead »

Peyton Place: James Douglas Dies at 86

We are sorry to report actor James Douglas died on March 5, 2016. Perhaps best known for his roles on cancelled TV shows like the daytime soap operas As the World Turns (CBS), One Life to Life (ABC) and ABC's primetime soap, Peyton Place, Douglas had a long TV career.

His first appearance was on The Millionaire TV series, in 1957. Director James Sheldon, who died on Saturday, March 19, directed that series. Other TV appearances by Douglas include the soap operas Another World, The Doctors, and The Edge of Night, as well as primetime offerings like 12 O'Clock High, Ironside, and Spenser for Hire.

Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Jason Wingreen, Original Voice of Boba Fett in ‘Star Wars,’ Dies at 95

Jason Wingreen, Original Voice of Boba Fett in ‘Star Wars,’ Dies at 95
Jason Wingreen, who first provided the voice of “Star Wars” bounty hunter Boba Fett, in 1980’s “The Empire Strikes Back,” died on Dec. 25. He was 95.

Wingreen appeared in films including 1980’s “Airplane!” and was a busy character actor on TV, guesting on series such as “Twilight Zone” (three episodes, including 1960’s “A Stop at Willoughby,” in which he played the train conductor); “The Untouchables” (a Chicago police captain); multiple episodes of “The Fugitive,” “The FBI” and “Ironside”; “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.”; the original “Star Trek” (Dr. Linke on the episode “The Empath”); “Seinfeld”; and “Matlock” (a judge). He played Harry the Bartender on “All in the Family” and “Archie Bunker’s Place” for a total of 117 episodes.

In “The Empire Strikes Back,” Boba Fett captured Harrison Ford’s Han Solo after Lando Calrissian (Billy Dee Williams) betrays Solo. Wingreen had first auditioned for the part of Yoda, but ended up
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Star Wars' Boba Fett Voice Actor Jason Wingreen Passes Away at 95

  • MovieWeb
'Star Wars' Boba Fett Voice Actor Jason Wingreen Passes Away at 95
Sad news for TV fans and the Star Wars family as prolific character actor Jason Wingreen has passed away. Known for his roles in All in the Family, The Twilight Zone and Seinfeld, Wingreen is perhaps best known as the voice of iconic bounty hunter Boba Fett in the Star Wars franchise. Jason Wingreen died on Christmas Day at his home in Los Angeles. He was 95.

Jason Wingreen was a prominent fixture on television from 1955 until he retired in the mid-1990s. Along with voicing Boba Fett, the actor gained worldwide notoriety on the hit 70s sitcom All in the Family, playing Harry the bartender. The role also carried over into the spinoff sitcom Archie Bunker's Place. Jason's son Ned confirmed the news of his father's passing last week. The man has over 200 TV credits to his name.

A native of Brooklyn, Jason Wingreen would appear in three separate episodes of The Twilight Zone,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Raise The Titanic and its $5m replica liner

  • Den of Geek
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The thriller Raise The Titanic was a $40m flop in 1980, its model Titanic alone costing millions. Ryan charts the replica's sad history...

By autumn 1977, author Clive Cussler was the toast of the publishing world. Following a decade of writing and two moderately successful novels, his third book, Raise The Titanic! was a runaway bestseller. Its popularity was a contrast to Cussler's earlier books, which had earned him a relatively meagre $5,000. But those earlier adventures - The Mediterranean Caper and Iceberg - helped establish the daring hero Dirk Pitt, a practical, earthy hero designed as a counterpoint to the suave, refined James Bond.

For Raise The Titanic!, Cussler dreamed up a scenario in which Pitt headed up a multi-billion-dollar operation to find and recover the doomed luxury liner, which sank in 1912. Their goal: to recover a mysterious, incredibly rare substance called byzantium from the ship's belly - a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Remembering Kubrick Actress Gray Pt.2: From The Killing to Leech Woman and Off-Screen School Prayer Amendment Fighter

Coleen Gray in 'The Sleeping City' with Richard Conte. Coleen Gray after Fox: B Westerns and films noirs (See previous post: “Coleen Gray Actress: From Red River to Film Noir 'Good Girls'.”) Regarding the demise of her Fox career (the year after her divorce from Rod Amateau), Coleen Gray would recall for Confessions of a Scream Queen author Matt Beckoff: I thought that was the end of the world and that I was a total failure. I was a mass of insecurity and depended on agents. … Whether it was an 'A' picture or a 'B' picture didn't bother me. It could be a Western movie, a sci-fi film. A job was a job. You did the best with the script that you had. Fox had dropped Gray at a time of dramatic upheavals in the American film industry: fast-dwindling box office receipts as a result of competition from television,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘A-Team’ TV Remake in the Works

‘A-Team’ TV Remake in the Works
The A-Team” is the latest iconic project to receive the TV remake treatment, as Variety has confirmed that 20th Century Fox TV is in early talks to bring back Stephen J. Cannell and Frank Lupo’s 1980s action series.

The project would offer a contemporary take on the NBC series remembered by most for starring Mr. T and his penchant for gold accessories (other stars included George Peppard, Dirk Benedict and Dwight Schultz, as well as many, many guest stars — some of whom played themselves). Keeping with the times, this version would include female members of the American Special Forces group.

“Fast & Furious” writer-producer Chris Morgan is executive producing this version with Cannell’s daughter, TV director Tawnia McKiernan (“Criminal Minds,” “Warehouse 13”). It is penned by “Sleepy Hollow” exec producer Albert Kim.

A feature film version of “The A-Team” was released in 2010 and starred Liam Neeson and Bradley Cooper.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Turbo Kid’ is modest midnight fun

  • SoundOnSight
Turbo Kid

Written & Directed by François Simard, Anouk Whissell & Yoann-Karl Whissell

Canada / New Zealand, 2015

Turbo Kid is a post-apocalyptic love letter to the action-horror genre. It looks and sounds wonderful, with the kind of world building you would expect from ‘80s film aficionados. The writing-directing trio of François Simard, Anouk Whissell & Yoann-Karl Whissell dials up the kitsch and adds just enough heart to keep things from getting too zany. Unfortunately, a lackluster script and bland leading performance prevent Turbo Kid from being more than just a pleasant trifle, but it’s a bloody fun way to spend your Saturday night.

Turbo Kid is a movie for movie lovers. From the funky costumes to a pitch-perfect synth soundtrack, it gets all the details exactly right. Ironically, this loving homage to ‘80s cheese more closely resembles a classic western than a Cannon Films holdover. The reluctant hero duels it out with the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91
Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as the Russian adopted father of the Klingon Worf.

Bikel did his first bigscreen work in John Huston’s 1951 classic “The African Queen” and Huston’s “Moulin Rouge.” After acting in a series of English films, he did supporting work in two high-profile pics in 1957: historical epic “The Pride and the Passion,” starring Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren, and “The Enemy Below,” a WWII submarine thriller starring Robert Mitchum.

He often played Germans or Russians — in his autobiography, Bikel said that his facility with accents resulted in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91
Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

In a statement Tuesday, Actors’ Equity Association said it “mourns the passing of our dear friend, our brother and former President Theo Bikel. From the time he joined Equity in 1954, Bikel has been an advocate for the members of our union and his extraordinary achievements paved the way for so many. No one loved theater more, his union better or cherished actors like Theo did. He has left an indelible mark on generation of members past and generations of members to come. We thank you, Theo, for all you have done.”

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Monica Lewis, Actress, Singer, Dies at 93

Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had co-starring roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family headed by her father Leon Lewis, who was a symphonic composer and conductor. Her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was an accomplished classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Monica Lewis, Actress Who Sang in Chiquita Banana Cartoons, Dies at 93

Monica Lewis, Actress Who Sang in Chiquita Banana Cartoons, Dies at 93
Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family. Her father Leon Lewis was a symphonic composer and conductor; her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was a classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Mad Men' poll: Which episode should Jon Hamm submit to Emmy judges?

'Mad Men' poll: Which episode should Jon Hamm submit to Emmy judges?
Jon Hamm deserves a drink. At the Emmys, he's gone 0 for 7 as Best Drama Actor, losing every single bid for his iconic "Mad Men" character Don Draper. He's also lost three times apiece for producing "Mad Men" and for guesting on "30 Rock," bringing his career total to 13 misfires. Will AMC's final batch of episodes (Part 2 of Season 7) finally seal the deal for this mad man, or is he destined to remain an Emmy also-ran? Vote in our poll below. Spoilers Ahead -Break- Will 'Mad Men' finale break Emmys curse? (Vote now in our poll) First, a bit of Emmy trivia: If Hamm is nominated again for this role, he'll be tied with three other gents -- Raymond Burr ("Perry Mason," "Ironside"), Peter Falk ("Columbo"), Dennis Franz ("NYPD Blue") -- for the most bids ever (8) in the Best Drama Actor category. And those three, it should be noted, are all winners.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Don Mankiewicz Dies at 93; Screenwriter Wrote ‘I Want to Live!,’ ‘Star Trek’ Episode

Don Mankiewicz, a member of a family of Hollywood royalty who earned an Oscar nomination for the screenplay to Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and also worked in television, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, Calif. He was 93.

Mankiewicz penned the pilot episodes of both ABC medical drama “Marcus Welby, M.D.,” which starred Robert Young and and James Brolin and ran 1969-76, and NBC cop drama “Ironside,” which starred Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound police detective on special assignment in San Francisco and ran 1967–75.

Don Mankiewicz was a son of Herman J. Mankiewicz, who won the screenplay Oscar for “Citizen Kane” together with with Orson Welles, and a nephew of Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who won Oscars for writing and directing best picture winner “All About Eve” (1950).

Don’s brother, Frank Mankiewicz, who served as an aide to Democratic presidential candidates Robert F. Kennedy and George McGovern,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Don Mankiewicz Dies at 93; Screenwriter Wrote ‘I Want to Live!,’ ‘Star Trek’ Episode

Don Mankiewicz, a member of a family of Hollywood royalty who earned an Oscar nomination for the screenplay to Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and also worked in television, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, Calif. He was 93.

Mankiewicz penned the pilot episodes of both ABC medical drama “Marcus Welby, M.D.,” which starred Robert Young and and James Brolin and ran 1969-76, and NBC cop drama “Ironside,” which starred Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound police detective on special assignment in San Francisco and ran 1967–75.

Don Mankiewicz was a son of Herman J. Mankiewicz, who won the screenplay Oscar for “Citizen Kane” together with with Orson Welles, and a nephew of Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who won Oscars for writing and directing best picture winner “All About Eve” (1950).

Don’s brother, Frank Mankiewicz, who served as an aide to Democratic presidential candidates Robert F. Kennedy and George McGovern,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Don M. Mankiewicz Dies: Oscar-Nominated Screenwriter, Novelist Was 93

Don M. Mankiewicz, who received an Oscar nomination for his screenplay I Want To Live and was the creator behind TV’s Ironside and Marcus Welby, M.D., died of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, CA, Saturday, his son told The Los Angeles Times. He was 93. Born in Berlin, German, Mankiewicz began his career as a staff writer for the New Yorker, and novelist, publishing his first novel Trial in 1954, which was later made into a film starring Glenn Ford and…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Don M. Mankiewicz Dies: Oscar-Nominated Screenwriter, Novelist Was 93

  • Deadline
Don M. Mankiewicz, who received an Oscar nomination for his screenplay I Want To Live and was the creator behind TV’s Ironside and Marcus Welby, M.D., died of congestive heart failure at his home in Monrovia, CA, Saturday, his son told The Los Angeles Times. He was 93. Born in Berlin, German, Mankiewicz began his career as a staff writer for the New Yorker, and novelist, publishing his first novel Trial in 1954, which was later made into a film starring Glenn Ford and…
See full article at Deadline »
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