Hondo (1967– )

TV Series  -   -  Western
7.9
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Title: Hondo (1967– )

Hondo (1967– ) on IMDb 7.9/10

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Season:

1

Year:

1967
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Ralph Taeger ...
 Hondo Lane (17 episodes, 1967)
...
 Angie Dow (17 episodes, 1967)
...
 Buffalo Baker (17 episodes, 1967)
Gary Clarke ...
 Capt. Richards (17 episodes, 1967)
...
 Chief Vittoro (17 episodes, 1967)
Buddy Foster ...
 Johnny Dow (17 episodes, 1967)
William Bryant ...
 Col. Crook (16 episodes, 1967)
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Storyline

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Genres:

Western

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

8 September 1967 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hondo  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Hondo's dog was Sam. See more »

Goofs

Colonel Crook in this series was obviously based on General George Crook (1828-1890), the most famous general in the Indian wars. In the first episode he even mentions taking only his toothbrush when going after the Piutes, which is straight from Crook's autobiography. But at least once Colonel Crook wears an eagle on a yellow background on his shoulder straps, the sign of a cavalry Colonel. General Crook was never a member of the cavalry branch, though he did command brigades and divisions of cavalry as a general in the Civil War. When he came to command in Arizona in 1871 he was the lieutenant colonel of the 23rd US Infantry. See more »

Connections

Edited into Hondo and the Apaches (1967) See more »

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User Reviews

A Genre Forever Lost
7 April 2000 | by (Out there in the dark) – See all my reviews

"Hondo" was one of the last attempts by network television to continue the long list of shows in this genre that dominated TV in the 1950s and early 60s. It really is lamentable that the viewing public had turned its back on westerns (except for "Gunsmoke", which was on its last legs by 1967.)

"Hondo" represented a somewhat more mature view of this type of show. It was not truly a "western" in the classic sense: none of the characters were cowboys, cattle were seldom seen, and the word "ranch" was never spoken. Instead, the series revolved around a small town run by a Union military post. The captain of this post functioned as the authority of law. While the main character, Hondo Lane, was an interesting variation on the classic western hero--a temperamental loner, wanted for murder he didn't commit, and for which he had been exonerated. Hondo was employed by the Union army as an Indian scout. He had been married to an Indian woman and remained on good terms with her father, the Apache chief.

Most of the 17 episodes are very good, with some excellent acting and interesting guest stars: Nick Adams, Rick Nelson, Charles McGraw, Forrest Tucker, Annette Funicello, among others. Ralph Taeger played the lead character with a touch of detachment that might remind some of Steve McQueen. There were many action sequences, some quite impressive and violent for television of the period. Series predecessors like "Maverick" and "The Wild Wild West" had probably changed audience perception of the western by 1967. "Hondo" had none of the tongue-in-cheek qualities of those shows. It was mainly serious focusing on complex characters in often volatile conflicts. A successful attempt was made to suggest the hard, uncomfortable lives these people led. Yes, there was a lovable, mangy dog. Yes, there was a little boy who idolized the hero. Not all cliches were absent, yet "Hondo" was a good example of a TV genre that is probably lost forever.


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