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The Wrong Box (1966)

 -  Adventure | Comedy | Crime  -  4 July 1966 (UK)
7.1
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Ratings: 7.1/10 from 2,045 users  
Reviews: 43 user | 15 critic

In Victorian England, a fortune now depends on which of two brothers outlives the other... or can be made to have seemed to do so!

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(suggested by a novel by), (suggested by a novel by), 2 more credits »
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Title: The Wrong Box (1966)

The Wrong Box (1966) on IMDb 7.1/10

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Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Lloyd ...
Brian Allen Harvey
James Villiers ...
Sydney Whitcombe Sykes
Graham Stark ...
Ian Scott Fife
Nicholas Parsons ...
Alan Frazer Scrope
Willoughby Goddard ...
James Whyte Wragg
Valentine Dyall ...
Oliver Pike Harmsworth
...
Vyvyan Alistair Montague
Hamilton Dyce ...
Derek Lloyd Peter Digby
Hilton Edwards ...
Lawyer
Timothy Bateson ...
Clerk
Donald Oliver ...
Gunner Sergeant
Totti Truman Taylor ...
Lady at Launching
Jeremy Roughton ...
Bugler
Frank Singuineau ...
Native Bearer
Michael Lees ...
Young Digby
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Storyline

A tontine is established for a dozen children, a tontine being a kind of bet/insurance, money is put in for each to grow with interest and the last survivor is to get the lot. We watch the group dwindle until only two brothers are left. One brother is watched by his nephews who will keep him alive at all costs, the other lives in ill health and poverty as the only support of his fairly stupid grandson. Statues and bodies are switched, in the wrong boxes until everyone is sure someone has died. Now if they can only make it seem as if the other brother died first, hundreds of thousands of pounds (in Victorian England when a pound was a pound) will be theirs. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Virtuous maidens...cunning cousins...dastardly deeds...bodies in barrels...and boxes and boxes of boxes!


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

4 July 1966 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

The Wrong Box  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

André Morell (The Club Butler) and John Mills (Masterman Finsbury) both played Professor Bernard Quatermass: Morell in Quatermass and the Pit (1958) and Mills in Quatermass (1979). See more »

Goofs

In the aftermath of the train wreck scene, the background sounds (i.e., muttering and exclamatory crowd noises) are "looped" mercilessly, the same few seconds of "babble" are repeated at least ten or fifteen times in a few minutes. See more »

Quotes

Peacock: [a grand piano jammed in a doorway] You know what that is? That is stuck. That is what that is.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The end credits are divided into sections, each preceded by an explanatory phrase as follows: for cast positions 1-9 "members of the tontine who came to untimely ends (in order of disappearance)"; for positions 10-17 "assisted by"; for positions 18-24 "The Finsbury Households"; for positions 25-53 "rest of cast in order of appearance" See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood: The Gift of Laughter (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

All Things Bright and Beautiful
(1848) (uncredited)
Music by William H. Monk
Lyrics by Cecil F. Alexander, from "Hymns for Little Children" (1838)
Sung a cappella by Cicely Courtneidge, Diane Clare and other Salvation Army girls
See more »

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User Reviews

And the word "whip" appears 146 times in the Bible
2 March 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote novels that studied character and its flaws: Long John Silver in "Treasure Island", Aleck Breck Stewart in "Kidnapped" and "David Balfour", James and Henry Durie in "The Master Of Ballentrae", Dr. Henry Jeckyll/Mr. Edward Hyde.... His best novels show the ambiguity of character. Yet with his interest in melodramatics he should have been a natural for writing mystery and detective stories, like his contemporaries Conan Doyle, Gilbert Chesterton, and Ernest Brahmah. They concentrated their gifts on character developments on their central story figures (Holmes and Watson, Father Brown, Max Carrados), but the basic plot development is what pulls the story along for all of them. Stevenson pulled the story plot to develop the characters instead.

Except once - "The Wrong Box". It is Stevenson's spoof on mystery and detective fiction. It was not his novel alone, but the first of three he wrote with his stepson Lloyd Osborne (to whom he told the story of "Treasure Island" before he wrote it down). Stevenson is telling the story of Masterman and Joseph Finsbury, the last two survivors of a special type of insurance form called a "tontine". It's an elaborate wager where a bunch of people put up a sum of money individually, and the last survivor gets the bulk of it. Masterman is home bound, and Joseph is a lively old bore who loves to talk and show off his preposterous knowledge of trivia (Ralph Richardson brings out the fact about the word "whip" when riding with a man holding a "whip"). Masterman (John Mills) lives with his grandson Michael (Michael Caine), and Joseph with his two greedy nephews (Morris and John - Peter Cook and Dudley Moore) and his niece Julia (Nanette Newman). Joseph does not really care about the tontine, but Masterman wants it - and is willing to speed the demise of Joseph to do it. Morris and John have to keep Joseph alive (which is not unlikely - he is in good health). Michael is not quite sure what is going on with his irascible grandfather, and Julia just knows she dislikes her two cousins Morris and John (but she really likes Michael). So the stage is set for the comedy. Along the way we meet other characters who are colorful: Dr. Pratt (Peter Sellers) - who at the drop of a hat will tell you about how he fell from medical grace to the backstreet he resides in; Peacock (Wilfred Lawson), Masterman's butler, who makes the average turtle look like it's turbocharged; the police Detective (Tony Hancock) - who can't put together a coherent idea if his life depended on it; and ...the Bournmouth Strangler (the story is from 1888, so we can guess who this character is based on).

It is a marvelous send-up on Victorian England, taking in the empire (notice the beginning when we see the demises of various members of the tontine), to the problems of railway traffic, talkative relatives, and body disposal in London in the 1880s. That the novel is not quite like the film does not matter (Michael is not a medical student but a clever barrister in the story, and John's relationship with Morris deteriorates in the story due to some money troubles), but this does not matter. It is a fun movie and well worth seeing.


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