IMDb > What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966)
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
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What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966) More at IMDbPro »

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What's Up, Tiger Lily? -- Trailer for this Woody Allen comedy

Overview

User Rating:
6.1/10   6,661 votes »
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Release Date:
2 November 1966 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
...IT'S ALL ABOUT LIFE, LOVE...FUN See more »
Plot:
In comic Woody Allen's film debut, he took the Japanese action film "International Secret Police: Key of Keys" and re-dubbed it, changing the plot to make it revolve around a secret egg salad recipe. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
The Spy Who Dubbed Me See more (66 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Tatsuya Mihashi ... Phil Moscowitz (archive footage)
Akiko Wakabayashi ... Suki Yaki (archive footage)

Mie Hama ... Teri Yaki (archive footage)

John Sebastian ... Himself (as The Lovin' Spoonful)
Tadao Nakamaru ... Shepherd Wong (archive footage)
Susumu Kurobe ... Wing Fat (archive footage)
Sachio Sakai ... Hoodlum (archive footage) (as A No Star Cast)
Hideyo Amamoto ... Cobra Man (archive footage)
Tetsu Nakamura ... Foreign Minister (archive footage) (as A No Star Cast)
Osman Yusuf ... Gambler (archive footage) (as A No Star Cast)

Woody Allen ... Himself / Dub Voice / Projectionist
Zal Yanovsky ... Himself (as The Lovin' Spoonful)
Joe Butler ... Himself (as The Lovin' Spoonful)
Steve Boone ... Himself (as The Lovin' Spoonful)
Frank Buxton ... Dub Voice (voice)

Louise Lasser ... Dubbed voice (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Len Maxwell ... Dubbed Voice
Kumi Mizuno ... Phil's Date (archive footage)
Mickey Rose ... Voice

China Lee ... Dancer in Credits (uncredited)
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Directed by
Woody Allen 
Senkichi Taniguchi 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Woody Allen 
Julie Bennett 
Frank Buxton 
Louise Lasser 
Len Maxwell 
Mickey Rose 
Bryan Wilson 

Produced by
Woody Allen .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
The Lovin' Spoonful 
 
Cinematography by
Kazuo Yamada 
 
Film Editing by
Richard Krown 
 
Music Department
Jack Lewis .... music editor
The Lovin' Spoonful .... music performers
Fred Weinberg .... music score engineer
 
Other crew
Samuel Z. Arkoff .... presents
Phill Norman .... titles
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
80 min | Spain:76 min (DVD edition)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In 1969, American International Pictures reissued this film on a double bill with Three in the Attic (1968).See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When the Port of Yokohama is shown, the captions call it "Yokahama".See more »
Quotes:
Shepherd Wong:I didn't order any fumigation! It's Wing Fool, you fat! I mean... it's Wing Fat, you fool!See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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26 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
The Spy Who Dubbed Me, 22 May 2005
Author: Fred (thurberdrawing@yahoo.com) from Long Island, USA

It's almost necessary to watch this with a friend or two. You'll need to make sure your friends are familiar with movie conventions of the mid-sixties. If they aren't, they might not laugh. If they are, you'll probably laugh at the same time and have fun. To be brief, WHAT'S UP, TIGER LILY is a Japanese detective movie made in 1964 and dubbed into English two years later for comic effect. The perpetrators are Woody Allen, Louise Lasser and a few others. In an unusual move, Woody Allen sets up the joke at the beginning, explaining on camera that's he's removed the soundtrack to the original, rewritten the dialogue and made it a comedy. What makes WHAT'S UP, TIGER LILY above-average, other than the fact that people don't just dub entire movies with gag-dialogue having nothing to do with the plot, is that it takes the humor which clearly already exists in the original and twists it. Although the original is foreign, it is very similar to any number of American or British detective movies of the time, such as OUR MAN FLINT or THE LADY IN CEMENT. Anybody who went to a double-feature in 1966 had sat through such a movie. The dubbed dialogue is not entirely removed from what is clearly the intent of the original dialogue. There are funny visuals in this movie. Woody Allen's dialogue spins on the visuals and makes fun of them up to a point, but it is, actually, a pretty good movie in the first place. It's not as if Allen took a bad movie and ridiculed it. The visuals are entertaining in themselves. Allen's plot involves a search for the world's greatest recipe for chicken soup. Every time the characters think they've found the recipe, we see them inspecting strips of microfilm. Obviously, the original involves a search for microfilm. So, the plot is obvious. Our maverick detective will track down the bad guys and win. Why not eliminate the original dialogue and treat us to a feature-film's worth of one-liners? If you like GET SMART, you'll probably like this movie. If you don't like GET SMART, you probably won't like it. But if you can't see why Allen bothered with this, you'll need to ask yourself why so many movies in the late sixties spoofed the spy genre. Woody Allen didn't operate in a vacuum here. A note on the recent altering of Woody Allen's dialogue: I have WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY on a DVD released by IMAGE ENTERTAINMENT. It contains both the soundtrack Woody Allen did for the 1966 release and what the packaging calls the "television audio" track. Very condsiderately, IMAGE provides an option for comparing the dialogue where Woody Allen's dialogue has been replaced by the dialogue of whomever has RE-RE-dubbed it for TV. I've compared some of them and am saddened to think that Allen's humor has been forcibly blunted for current broadcast. But IMAGE does let us hear the difference, and that's more than TV audiences may be getting. If you see this on TV and think the dialogue is strangely tepid, try the DVD. You'll be able to hear what Woody Allen intended. (I have to qualify this, though, because he seems to have had to put up with a certain amount of studio interference in 1966.) Finally, I'll say that you'll probably recognize a few of the actors in this movie. Two of the women appeared in a James Bond movie, and the main actor, Tatsuya Mihashi, who died only last year (in 2004) appeared in several prestigious films. Therefore, Woody Allen isn't trouncing on helpless fools here.

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Fabulous Quotes! LynchNut77
Akiko Wakabayashi's picture is wrong godzillafreak97
Dull and boring aleksandar-5
The original movie James Cole
couple things about the movie jci72
Music surfin_bird
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