MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 20,207 this week

The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966)
"Uccellacci e uccellini" (original title)

 -  Comedy | History  -  4 May 1966 (Italy)
7.5
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.5/10 from 2,119 users  
Reviews: 17 user | 24 critic

On an empty road, an old man is walking with his son. They meet a crow that can speak. They are changed into monks and Saint Francois sent them to preach for hawks and sparrows. A reflexion... See full summary »

Writers:

(screenplay), (story)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 24 titles
created 19 Oct 2011
 
a list of 25 titles
created 31 May 2012
 
a list of 45 titles
created 03 Mar 2013
 
a list of 36 titles
created 7 months ago
 
a list of 49 titles
created 1 month ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966)

The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966) on IMDb 7.5/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Hawks and the Sparrows.
3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  
Director: Gérard Oury
Stars: Louis de Funès, Yves Montand, Alice Sapritch
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  
Director: Géza von Bolváry
Stars: Hans Moser, Marte Harell, Johannes Heesters
Molière (2007)
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Imprisoned for debt, playwright Molière is rescued by an aristocrat who needs his help in order to seduce a young marquise.

Director: Laurent Tirard
Stars: Romain Duris, Fabrice Luchini, Laura Morante
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Mel Brooks brings his one-of-a-kind comic touch to the history of mankind covering events from the Old Testament to the French Revolution in a series of episodic comedy vignettes.

Director: Mel Brooks
Stars: Mel Brooks, Gregory Hines, Dom DeLuise
Drama | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Russia, 1936: revolutionary hero Colonel Kotov is spending an idyllic summer in his dacha with his young wife and six-year-old daughter Nadia and other assorted family and friends. Things ... See full summary »

Director: Nikita Mikhalkov
Stars: Nikita Mikhalkov, Ingeborga Dapkunaite, Oleg Menshikov
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Three narrators (French writer Jean Martin, an English royal equerry, and a papal chamberlain) tell the story of seven matched pearls, four of them now in the British Crown. Episodes whirl ... See full summary »

Director: Sacha Guitry
Stars: Jacqueline Delubac, Sacha Guitry, Lyn Harding
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

On his death bed in the 1820s, King Ferdinando I of Naples tries to escape the ghosts of his bloody kingship by remembering his younger days, when he was allowed to go hunting and have fun,... See full summary »

Director: Lina Wertmüller
Stars: Sergio Assisi, Gabriella Pession, Nicole Grimaudo
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Several urban legends of Communist Romania are dramatized.

Directors: Hanno Höfer, Razvan Marculescu, and 3 more credits »
Stars: Diana Cavallioti, Radu Iacoban, Vlad Ivanov
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

When two musicians witness a mob hit, they flee the state in an all female band disguised as women, but further complications set in.

Director: Billy Wilder
Stars: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon
Comedy | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

The misadventures of Attila and his band of barbarians as they take up arms against the Roman Empire in their native Milano.

Directors: Franco Castellano, Giuseppe Moccia
Stars: Diego Abatantuono, Angelo Infanti, Mauro Di Francesco
Comedy | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Rome, 1825. Bishop Rivarola (Tognazzi) and colonel Nardoni (Salerno) are in charge to suppress liberal revolution. Shoemaker Cornacchia (Manfredi) got the information that the liberal ... See full summary »

Director: Luigi Magni
Stars: Nino Manfredi, Enrico Maria Salerno, Claudia Cardinale
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Based on Paolo Villaggio's books "Fantozzi" and "Il secondo, tragico Fantozzi", which are popular in Italy, this film tells the story of an unfortunate accountant's life over the course of ... See full summary »

Director: Luciano Salce
Stars: Paolo Villaggio, Anna Mazzamauro, Gigi Reder
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Innocenti Totò / Brother Cicillo
...
Innocenti Ninetto / Brother Ninetto (as Davoli Ninetto)
Femi Benussi ...
Luna
Umberto Bevilacqua ...
Incensurato
Renato Capogna ...
The medieval rude fellow
Alfredo Leggi
Renato Montalbano
Flaminia Siciliano
Giovanni Tarallo ...
Starving peasant boy
Vittorio Vittori ...
Ciro Lococo
Edit

Storyline

On an empty road, an old man is walking with his son. They meet a crow that can speak. They are changed into monks and Saint Francois sent them to preach for hawks and sparrows. A reflexion about idealism. Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The surprise comedy hit of the New York Film Festival See more »

Genres:

Comedy | History

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 May 1966 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The Hawks and the Sparrows  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

On February, 14th, 1988 Laura Betti introduced a reconstructed version of the film (99 min) at the 'Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin'. This version contains a short episode with Totò called "Toto al circo", which was not included in the original release. Although director Pier Paolo Pasolini reported about his work on it, this episode had never been shown to the public before. See more »

Crazy Credits

The opening credits are performed as a song. See more »

Connections

Edited into Histoire(s) du cinéma: Une histoire seule (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Il Corvo Professore
Composed by Ennio Morricone
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
the most irreverent Italian satire you've never seen, this is one of Pasolini's very best
18 January 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

How I love a film that taps into the absurd while staying true to the symbolism, and in the process mocking it and then creating symbolism again. It's a very tricky thing- Bunuel was one of the masters at it- and Pier Paolo Pasolini, in one of his rare outright comedies, does just that. The Hawks and the Sparrows is simple enough to explain, in its central conceit: an older man (Toto) and a younger man (Ninetto) are walking along on some not-totally-clear journey (Toto might have some debts to fix or something, and he has apparently eighteen children), and they meet a talking crow, who talks and talks a lot. Then they get into some strange happenings, all comical. But it's the kind of comedy then that Pasolini uses like some deranged poetic waxing on about silent comedy and theories on God and faith and love and politics and, uh, stomach cramps I guess. It's completely off the wall, at times like a roadrunner cartoon (or, for that matter, the best Buster Keaton), and it's told with a dedication to the comic situation. It's masterful.

At times it doesn't seem that way though. It could, in less concerted hands, be more scatter-shot, with some scenes working better than others, and with the one sure bet being the crow (voiced by a great Francesco Leonetti). But from the start, Paoslini is completely confident with the material, from the opening titles that are sung (heh), with the throw-away scene with the kids dancing at the restaurant (with an amazing Ennio Morricone rock song that pops in and out of the film), to the sudden inter-titles ala Monty Python ("the crow is a "left-wing intellectual"), and then onward with the little stories within the framework of the 'road movie'. The biggest chunk Pasolini shows us is the story of two monks- also played by Toto and Davoli- who are instructed by their head monk to talk to the hawks and sparrows and teach them about God. And they do, in bird speak (which is also subtitled in case it's needed), and then go through an allegorical tale of the ins and outs of faith.

It takes some wicked subversion to make these scenes work, but they work hilariously, to the point where I laughed almost every minute of the sequence (as well as with other ones, the exception being the archival clips late in the film of the protest marches). Pasolini once said he was "as unbeliever who has a nostalgia for belief", imbues the story of the monks with a sense of charm to it- you like Toto and Davoli in the parts, not even so much that they're good in the roles, which they are very much so, but because there's some bedrock that the satire can spring from so easily. He, via the exceptional Tonino Delli Colli, films the Hawks and the Sparrows as strong in sumptuous black and white as any of his other early-mid 60s films. But there's a lot more going on within the comedy; it's like he skims a line that he could make it as, like with some of his other work (unfortunately ala Teorema) pretentious and annoyingly trite in its intellectual points. But as he goes to lengths to put a spin on it, it turns into pitch-black comedy, revealing him as an even deeper artist because of it.

Take the birth scene, where the weird theater-type troupe who drive around in a car have to pause in their play on "How the Romans Ruined the Earth", and it suddenly becomes a sly farce unto itself. Something that should be sacred is given the air of playfulness, as though everyone is told "yes, it's alright to be in on the joke", where Toto covers Ninetto's eyes, other actors in the group pray, and then walla, there's a baby, clean as day. Morricone's score, I might add, brings a lot to this air of fun and playfulness, even when (and rightfully so) it goes to the more typical strings and orchestral sounds than the rockabilly, which sounds more like unused bits from Pulp Fiction. And finally, there's the crow itself, which unto itself- had Pasolini not made it mockable- would be funny anyway, as it's a frigging talking crow who for some reason follows the men anywhere they go. It's already allegorical of a sort of guide or voice of reason on their journey, which is fine. But including the ending especially, Pasolini allows for the joke to flip over itself.

With the Hawks and the Sparrows, we get the absurd and the surreal, placed wonderfully in social constructs, and it reveals a filmmaker who can, unlike but like his controversial reputation presents, open up a whole other perspective with a strange twist that mixes classic Italian film style and scathing subject matter. A+


11 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Hawks and the Sparrows (1966) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?