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The Raid, Filmmaker John Carpenter, Last Jedi Bts, And More -- The Lrm Weekend

  • LRM Online
By David Kozlowski | 21 July 2017

Welcome to Issue #5 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issue: 7.14.17

What's happening everybody? It's Comic-Con week here at Lrm, so while everyone else is geeking-out down in San Diego, we decided to get a little bit weird. We're digging into some classic John Carpenter films, we've got a couple truly amazing fight scenes, a war film that can go toe-to-toe with Dunkirk, and an awesome new behind-the-scenes video about this holiday's Star Wars: The Last Jedi! Have a great Weekend guys!!!

Why do we love superheroes, martial arts, fantasy, and sci-fi? The big fight scenes, of course. Every week we'll bring you an epic
See full article at LRM Online »

Lego Origins, Daredevil's Best Fight, Steve McQueen, and More! -- The Lrm Weekend

  • LRM Online
By David Kozlowski | 23 June 2017

Welcome to the Lrm Weekend, a weekly column highlighting cool and unique videos about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your favorite videos to: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Each week we'll highlight interesting, and offbeat, videos regarding some of our favorite Lrm topics currently trending on YouTube, Vimeo, Twitch, and other popular video sites around the Internet.

What Is It?

Ever wondered how the whole Lego movie craze got started? Witness the evolution of Lego animation from 2001 until today in this amazing, behind-the-scenes video.

Why Should We Care?

Between the Lego video games, The Lego Movie (2014), and The Lego Batman Movie (2017), it feels like we've been in a Lego world for a long, long time. Way back in 2001 a character named Jack Stone debuted in a 20-minute VHS short,
See full article at LRM Online »

Book Review: "Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures" By Joe Jordan

  • CinemaRetro
By Dean Brierly

For a film director with such an iconic resume, there’s a surprising scarcity of scholarly books devoted to Robert Wise, the man who directed such classics as "West Side Story" (1961), "The Haunting" (1963), “The Sound of Music” (1965), “The Curse of the Cat People” (1944), “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (1951), “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and many other critical and commercial successes. To say nothing of his stature as the man who edited “Citizen Kane” (1941) and “The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942) before taking up decades-long residence in the director’s chair.

Wise brought a self-effacing approach to directing, one that never drew attention to itself. He may have had the most “invisible” style of all the major directors from Hollywood’s Golden Era, which no doubt helps explain why he never had the auteur imprimatur conferred upon him by French critics who swooned over Welles’ baroque visuals, Douglas Sirk’s melodramatic excess,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Jerry Goldsmith’s 10 Most Indelible Scores

Jerry Goldsmith’s 10 Most Indelible Scores
In honor of Jerry Goldsmith’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Jon Burlingame offers ten scores that best capture the late composer’s genius.

1. A Patch of Blue (1965) For the tender relationship between a blind white girl (Elizabeth Hartman) and the kindly black man (Sidney Poitier) she befriends, Goldsmith wrote a haunting, delicate score featuring piano and harmonica.

2. The Sand Pebbles (1966) Goldsmith’s first epic score, for director Robert Wise’s film about a U.S. gunboat in Chinese waters in the 1920s starring Steve McQueen. He evoked an Asian atmosphere with exotic instruments, and his love theme (“And We Were Lovers”) was recorded by artists from Andy Williams to Shirley Bassey.

3. Planet of the Apes (1968) A landmark in film-music history, this unearthly, Bartok- and Stravinsky-influenced soundscape strongly implied that Charlton Heston and his fellow astronauts were marooned on a far-off planet… when, in fact, they were on Earth all along.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94
Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

March Madness: "Batman V. Superman" - Is There A Joker In The Deck?

  • CinemaRetro
"Batman v. Superman": potential blockbuster or "Cleopatra Redux".

By Lee Pfeiffer

The heavily-hyped Warner Brothers super hero epic "Batman V. Superman:  Dawn of Justice" is one of the most heavily promoted films in years. It's also one of the most expensive. Variety estimates that the film's $250 million production budget plus ancillary marketing costs will make it necessary for the movie to gross $800 worldwide just to break even. You read that right: $800 million. One industry analyst says that anything less than a gross of $1 billion will be considered a disappointment. Warner Brothers contends that those figures don't take into consideration ancillary revenues from video and merchandising. Fair enough, but if a film bombs, generally speaking, the merchandise and video sales do, too. If you doubt it, how many people did you see walking around with "Waterworld" or "Howard the Duck" T shirts? Veteran screenwriter William Goldman once said of the film industry "Nobody knows anything.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

  • Cinelinx
The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it
See full article at Cinelinx »

Personal Reflections On The Closing Of New York's Ziegfeld Theatre

  • CinemaRetro
Glory days: the Ziegfeld hosted many premieres over the decades including the 1972 gala for Bob Fosse's "Cabaret". Forty years later the Ziegfeld hosted Liza Minnelli and other cast members who returned for a screening of the restored version of the film.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

In 1969 the Ziegfeld Theatre in Manhattan opened its doors for the first time. The lavish theater quickly won the hearts of movie fans. It was an elaborate place and showcased top films. It was considered New York's secondary jewel, however, as Radio City Music Hall was still alive and well and showing top-notch movies. Over the years Radio City closed its doors, a victim of changing times in the film industry. The Hall would only show family friendly films and there were precious few that could profitably play at the cavernous theater. You used to be able to get to a first run movie
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Captive City

Robert Wise's taut noir suspenser about the Mafia takeover of a small city is like an underworld Invasion of the Body Snatchers. John Forsythe's newsman slowly realizes that gambling corruption has infiltrated the business district, city hall, and even his close associates; he's expected to become a crook too, or else. Great docudrama style aided by a special deep-focus lens; Estes Kefauver makes a personal appearance touting the crime-busting Washington committee that inspired the picture. The Captive City Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1952 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 91 min. Street Date January 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring John Forsythe, Joan Camden, Marjorie Crossland, Victor Sutherland, Ray Teal, Martin Milner, Geraldine Hall, Hal K. Dawson, Paul Brinegar, Estes Kefauver, Victor Romito. Cinematography Lee Garmes Film Editor Robert Swink Original Music Jerome Moross Written by Alvin M. Josephy Jr., Karl Kamb Produced by Theron Warth Directed by Robert Wise

Reviewed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

David Reviews Robert Wise’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Let’s get the obvious question out of the way: why in the world is Criterion Cast posting a review of Star Trek: The Motion Picture? The film was released in the late Seventies, no new version has been recently issued on either Blu-ray or in a new theatrical run, and while it’s not completely out of the realm of possibility for this site to take a look at mainstream big budget productions aimed at the mass audience, it’s also pretty obvious that St:tmp isn’t the sort of movie that fits all that comfortably alongside the foreign, independent and alternative cinematic expressions that typically draw our critical attention.

The reason I’m posting this review here is that I agreed to participate in the 2015 White Elephant Blogathon, a project organized by Philip Tatler in which he solicits nominations from a couple dozen movie bloggers for offbeat films
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Precedent for an Eddie Redmayne or Michael Keaton Oscar Win

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

With Michael Keaton winning the Golden Globe for best actor in a musical or comedy and Eddie Redmayne winning for best actor in a drama, both men continue establishing themselves as the frontrunners in this year’s lead actor race at the Oscars.

Though not new to films, Redmayne starred in Oscar-nominated films such as Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2008) and Les Miserables (2012). His performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, however, propelled him to widespread acclaim and put him on the radar. He is one of four best actor nominees — along with Keaton, Benedict Cumberbatch and Steve Carell — to receive their first nomination this year.

For most of his career, Keaton was known for his comedic roles, such as Mr. Mom (1983) and Beetlejuice (1988), and for his turn as Batman in Tim Burton’s Batman (1989) and Batman Returns (1992). These roles earned Keaton praise and
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Variety Hires Veteran L.A. Times Journalist Jim Rainey As Senior Film Reporter

Award-winning journalist Jim Rainey, who spent most of the last 30 years working as a reporter, editor, columnist and blogger for the Los Angeles Times, has joined Variety as a Senior Film Reporter.

Rainey will cover the major Hollywood studios and all aspects of the movie business, writing breaking stories, analytical features and profiles for Variety.com and the weekly magazine. He will also contribute to Variety’s conferences, panel discussions and video interviews as well as appear on major TV and radio news outlets to discuss industry issues.

Based in Los Angeles, Rainey will report to Claudia Eller, co-editor-in-chief, and work closely with Variety’s team of reporters in L.A., New York and around the globe. He will begin at Variety on January 19.

“I worked alongside Jim when I was at the L.A. Times and have always considered him one of the best and brightest journalists in the world,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Remembering Robin Williams, Lauren Bacall, Sir Richard Attenborough and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in August

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies who have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Sir Richard Attenborough (1923-2014) - Actor and Filmmaker. He won Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture for Gandhi and also directed Chaplin, A Bridge Too FarCry Freedom and A Chorus Line. He'd been an actor first, earning Golden Globes for supporting in Doctor Dolittle and The Sand Pebbles. He also starred in Jurassic Park (see below), Lost World: Jurassic Park, the 1994 version of Miracle on 34th Street, The Great...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

‘Jurassic World’ Set Photo Reveals Richard Attenborough Tribute

  • Screen Rant
We were all saddened at the passing of Lord Richard Attenborough, a man whose career spanned over 70 years and earned him two Oscars for his directorial masterpiece, Gandhi, as well as two Golden Globes for performances in The Sand Pebbles and Doctor Doolittle.Most know Attenborough best for his role as the entrepreneur John Hammond, who in the 1993 film Jurassic Park envisioned a state of the art park where people could witness real life dinosaurs. Attenborough charmed audiences with Hammond’s enthusiasm, however misguided, but never played Hammond as a buffoon, instead giving the character a sad, almost tragic edge.

Over 20 years later, the Jurassic Park franchise is ready for a comeback with Jurassic World in 2015. This latest film in the series finds Hammond’s dream a reality, as a fully ...

Click to continue reading ‘Jurassic World’ Set Photo Reveals Richard Attenborough Tribute
See full article at Screen Rant »

This Is How Jurassic World Is Paying Tribute To John Hammond

In Memoriam. pic.twitter.com/5jL7Sh9Hpr. Colin Trevorrow (@colintrevorrow) August 25, 2014 This weekend we lost the legendary Lord Richard Attenborough, and even today his loss is still felt. The tremendous actor/director of such films as The Great Escape, The Sand Pebbles, Brighton Rock, Gandhi and Chaplin left a full life and a grand legacy behind, which has mostly been highlighted by his work in Steven Spielberg's 1993 masterpiece Jurassic Park. Now while Attenborough did have an enormous legacy before his role as the eccentric John Hammond, it is that role that most modern audiences identify him with. A role that is being paid tribute by friends, colleagues, and even those who did not get to work with him, but continue his legacy tangentially. Case in point is Colin Trevorrow's tweet from last night, showcasing what can be assumed to be a memorial to John Hammond in the
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Richard Attenborough's 8 Most Beloved Roles

Richard Attenborough's 8 Most Beloved Roles
Honored and adored, British actor and director Richard Attenborough died Sunday, leaving a void in the world of entertainment. Over the course of his 60-year-plus career that took him both behind (as a director and producer, of Gandhi, Shadowlands and Chaplin) and in front (as an actor) of the camera, Attenborough notched a considerable number of indelible roles. Here are some of the finer examples of his acting. The Great Escape (1963) Attenborough made a number of films with Steve McQueen, but probably none better remembered than this WWII adventure classic, largely responsible for the "motley crew of outcasts band together
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Remembering Lord Richard Attenborough

  • CinemaRetro
Attenborough's role in the 1963 classic The Great Escape gained him international acclaim.

The film industry has lost another legend with the passing of Lord Richard Attenborough, who was one of the pioneers in successfully carving out dual careers as both actor and director. Attenborough was a familiar face as an acclaimed character actor in British films in the post-wwii era but gained international stardom in director John Sturges' 1963 WWII classic The Great Escape. (Attenborough's co-star in that film, James Garner, passed away last month). Attenborough also co-starred with Steve McQueen in that film and would reunite with him in director Robert Wise's sprawling 1966 epic The Sand Pebbles, which would earn Attenborough a Golden Globe award and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He directed his first film in 1969, a big-budget anti-war musical Oh! What a Lovely War. In 1972, he directed the ambitious screen biography of Churchill, Young Winston.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Richard Attenborough Appreciation: A Legacy Beyond ‘Gandhi’

Richard Attenborough Appreciation: A Legacy Beyond ‘Gandhi’
To many in the entertainment industry, Richard Attenborough will always be synonymous with “Gandhi,” which is understandable. The filmmaker, who died Sunday at 90, directed only a dozen films, and none of them matched his 1982 bio-epic.

But Attenborough was also an actor of great range, from his lower-class hoodlum in the 1947 “Brighton Rock” (from Graham Greene’s novel) to the Pow in “The Great Escape” (third-billed under Steve McQueen and James Garner) to a high-kicking circus owner in the 1967 “Dr. Doolittle,” adding energy and pep to a film that needed both.

Attenborough’s best-known work as an actor was in the 1993 “Jurassic Park,” but his career had been going for 50 years at that point. Some of his best performances came in the mid-1960s. He starred with Kim Stanley in “Seance on a Wet Afternoon” as two scam artists whose scheme goes very wrong, and it was followed in the next
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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