IMDb > Persona (1966)
Persona
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Persona (1966) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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8.2/10   44,852 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Ingmar Bergman (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Persona on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 March 1967 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A new film by Ingmar Bergman See more »
Plot:
A nurse is put in charge of an actress who can't talk and finds that the actress's persona is melding with hers. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. Another 10 wins & 5 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(104 articles)
User Reviews:
The most ambiguous, inviting, surreal, whatever-you-can-think philosophical experiment by Bergman See more (154 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Bibi Andersson ... Alma

Liv Ullmann ... Elisabet Vogler
Margaretha Krook ... The Doctor

Gunnar Björnstrand ... Mr. Vogler
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jörgen Lindström ... Elisabet's Son (uncredited)

Directed by
Ingmar Bergman 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Ingmar Bergman  story and screenplay

Produced by
Ingmar Bergman .... producer
 
Original Music by
Lars Johan Werle 
 
Cinematography by
Sven Nykvist 
 
Film Editing by
Ulla Ryghe 
 
Production Design by
Bibi Lindström 
 
Costume Design by
Mago 
 
Makeup Department
Tina Johansson .... assistant makeup artist
Börje Lundh .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Lars-Owe Carlberg .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lenn Hjortzberg .... assistant director
Bo Arne Vibenius .... assistant director (as Bo Vibenius)
 
Art Department
Karl-Arne Bergman .... property master (as Karl Arne Bergman)
 
Sound Department
Evald Andersson .... special sound effects
Lennart Engholm .... sound
Olle Jacobsson .... sound mixer
Per-Olof Pettersson .... sound (as P.O. Pettersson)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Anders Bodin .... assistant camera
Lars Johnsson .... assistant camera
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Eivor Kullberg .... costume assistant
 
Other crew
Kerstin Berg .... script supervisor
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
85 min | Argentina:80 min | USA:83 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:M | Finland:K-15 (2004) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1967) | France:Unrated | Portugal:M/16 (Qualidade) | Singapore:NC-16 | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (re-rating) (2002) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
According to himself, Ingmar Bergman fell in love with Liv Ullmann during the making of the movie.See more »
Quotes:
The Doctor:I understand, all right. The hopeless dream of being - not seeming, but being. At every waking moment, alert. The gulf between what you are with others and what you are alone. The vertigo and the constant hunger to be exposed, to be seen through, perhaps even wiped out...See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Ingmar Bergman on Life and Work (1998) (TV)See more »

FAQ

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49 out of 76 people found the following review useful.
The most ambiguous, inviting, surreal, whatever-you-can-think philosophical experiment by Bergman, 5 February 2005
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

Writing from a hospital bed (as he did with Wild Strawberries, two of these being films strung out from anguish), Ingmar Bergman put down almost anything that was in his head to start with (the first five minutes- some of the most startling and thoroughly symbolic minutes he's ever directed), then transposed into a story of two women, or one. This was one of the landmark 'art-films' of the 1960's, with hints of the horrors of war (in one memorable scene, Elisabeth looks at a television screen at images of death), introspection regarding sex and identity, existentialism, and what it means to be an actor.

Some of the more famous directors in history have a kind of 'notorious' film, by which many people who may not know the bulk of their works know them by one particular work (with Hitchcock it could be Psycho, Lucas' Star Wars, Bunuel with Un chien Andalou, Breathless). This could, arguably, be the one for Bergman, despite a couple of others likely also holding claim to that title. In other words, this could be a good place to start with the director if you're not familiar with his films, or it might not be. But keep this in mind- it's one of his most unique departures as a filmmaker.

Two of his leading ladies (and, ahem, loves), Bibi Andersson and 25 year-old Liv Ullmann, star as a nurse and an actress, who for the bulk of the film are at a Doctor's cottage as the nurse tries to help and likely cure Elisabeth of her ailment (froze on stage, silent but incredibly observant). In the meantime, Alma the nurse, in a role that gives Andersson more talking-points than any other film she's been in, goes through some hurtful parts of her past, and just tries to understand her counter-part. At one point, a vein of existentialism is ruptured thoughtfully, when Alma gets Elisabeth to say "No, don't", when she threatens her. When I first saw this film, I knew this scene would come after reading Roger Ebert's review. But I had no idea it would hit me like it did. There is such a great, compelling tension between these two that Andersson and Ullmann convey that it is what makes the film work. Any lessor actresses might fumble up the whole lot of it.

While it isn't my favorite Bergman film (though it is unfair to pick favorites sometimes when it comes to someone as huge in the cine-consciousness as him), there are many things that had me come back to it after being a little awe-struck on my first viewing last year. For one thing, there's Sven Nykvist, with one of the strongest, most varying eyes in all of European cinema.

In the first five minutes, of course, there is some fascinating stuff, but even in the scenes of long dialog and monologue (i.e. the unforgettable speech about being on the beach from Alma), where the lighting is so delicate and sharp with the shadows that you really feel like the weight of this situation is closing in on the characters. Or, of course, when the two actresses' faces are super-imposed, which can be interpreted in more ways than one (either as a grand statement, or as pretension, or something else). I was also very moved by the pace of the film, how it fills each minute (it's not a long movie) in ways that some movies just float minutes by.

Now, this is the kind of Bergman film that can't be turned on any time (not to make it sound un-watchable, it certainly isn't). But it does ask to be viewed when in a certain frame of mind- if you're looking for a movie to show off to your friends, like it's the Euro/avant-garde version of Fight Club minus the violence, look away. It poses a good many questions for a viewer, especially one who knows of Bergman's themes he's explored before and after this film's release. How do we feel, or know we're feeling? What keeps us closed in? Why do we hurt? And are we only one person at a time?

It's all the more puzzling that Bergman's climax isn't a very easy one (not as doomed as with Seventh Seal but not as cheerful as Fanny and Alexander), as Alma has another monologue with Elisabeth, about her son she hasn't seen in a long while- this famously seen from two different angles, one after the other. Furthermore, it is arguably Bergman's most self-conscious film to date (the commentary on the DVD carries it well), however it may not be as off-putting as with some of Godard.

To put it another way, there are two sides to the subject matter, the film, the director, and the audience.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Persona (1966)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Why I turned it off after 30 minutes evect
Couldnt get into this one.. melancholy-on-ice
Two real women HoratiusFlacc
Breaking Down Bergman on Persona eo_guy
Can someone explain to me the end? salo_marc
After My First Viewing, Here Is My Initial Interpretation... tcaminito
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