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The Oscar (1966)

Approved | | Drama | 8 July 1966 (UK)
Snotty Hollywood actor becomes even more full of himself after he's nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Orrin C. Quentin
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Network Executive
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Herself
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Herself
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Storyline

Frankie Fane has clawed his way to the top of the Hollywood heap. Now, as he's preparing to win his Oscar, his friend Hymie Kelly reminisces over their life together, and Frankie's ruthless struggle to the top and the people he's stepped on (i.e., everyone else in the movie) to make it there. Written by <crow_steve@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The dreamers and the schemers...the hustlers and the hopefuls...the free-loaders and the phonies...the fakers and the famous...all fighting for the highest possible award! See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

8 July 1966 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

El Óscar  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

(Pathécolor)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was James Dunn's final film before his death on September 1, 1967 at the age of 65. See more »

Goofs

The newspaper photos of Cheryl Barker hitting Frankie don't match the scene when it happens. She could have hit him twice (she was angry enough), and the photographers might have caught the second hit. See more »

Quotes

Frankie: [referring to Steve Marks] What happened to him? He was a good actor. He made more pictures than I have.
Alfred 'Kappy' Kapstetter: This is a chancy business, Frankie. You never know you're on the way out 'til you suddenly realize it would take a ticket to get back in.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Mouth 3 (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Carmen Carmela
(Traditional)
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User Reviews

 
Hate Me Glow
16 June 2008 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

If anyone follows my reviews one will note that I always use the expression hero/heel when talking about Tyrone Power. He could be a full blooded hero or he was a hero/heel, a likable sort of guy, but one who was ruthless in getting what he wanted. You need someone of Power's ability and charm to play such a part. And sad to say that was something Stephen Boyd just doesn't bring to The Oscar.

Even when one is an anti-hero there has to be certain qualities brought out that make you root for the guy. Two minutes into watching The Oscar and I wanted to punch out Stephen Boyd. This guy is all heel with no charm and uses people like toilet paper.

Joseph E. Levine assembled quite a cast to support Boyd and I don't think I've ever seen so much talent squandered on such a mediocre picture. Try counting the number of Oscar winners in it. Just Edith Head's Oscars and she plays herself in the film must bring the total to over 20. She got a nomination here for costume design, one of two The Oscar got, the second was for Art&Set design.

Tony Bennett is the hero's best friend who is similarly used and abused doesn't give a half bad performance and this was to be a breakthrough for him as a dramatic actor like Bing Crosby or Frank Sinatra. I also liked Milton Berle as his agent.

Some of the women in Boyd's life in this film are Eleanor Parker, Elke Sommer, and Jill St. John. The one I liked best was Jean Hale as a star who the up and coming Boyd is sent on a publicity date with. She's a female version of him so there is one great moment where she gets dumped on literally.

One woman who was in Stephen Boyd's life and who always tried to promote his career in her column appears her as herself in one of her last appearances. Rumor has it that Boyd made old Hedda Hopper's life particularly memorable in her golden years.

In the old My Favorite Martian series there was an episode where Ray Walston uses a special light bulb in the room and it gives off a benevolence bulb. You just become inexplicably likable to all around. Bill Bixby sees this as a great way to score with women and he uses it. But Walston tells him that on earthlings it gives you a hate me glow and the two spend the rest of the episode trying to find the antidote.

That's what Boyd projected here, a two hour hate me glow. And in fact this review is dedicated to an attorney I knew back in Brooklyn, a man who had ambitions for a great political career, but had a hate me glow that made Boyd look like Albert Schweitzer. No names of course, but Ronald J. D'Angelo this film is for you.

The Oscar is a campy all star look at an ambitious actor and if you can stand the hate me glow that Boyd projects, you'll like looking at the stars.


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