Edit
A Man for All Seasons (1966) Poster

Trivia

Truckloads of Styrofoam were ordered to simulate a snowy landscape. As soon as it was delivered, real snow began falling.
Vanessa Redgrave refused to be paid for her cameo role as Anne Boleyn.
Robert Bolt borrowed the title from Robert Whittinton, a contemporary of Thomas More, who in 1520 wrote of him: "More is a man of an angel's wit and singular learning; I know not his fellow. For where is the man of that gentleness, lowliness and affability? And, as time requireth, a man of marvelous mirth and pastimes, and sometime of as sad gravity: a man for all seasons."
Orson Welles used an exact duplicate of Cardinal Wolsey's official seal, as well as authentic sheepskin parchment and a quill pen.
According to Orson Welles, he had Fred Zinnemann removed from the set, and directed his scenes himself. However, in his autobiography, Zinnemann, while discussing the casting of, and working with, Welles, makes no mention of this.
Charlton Heston lobbied heavily for the role of Thomas More, but was never seriously considered by the producers as a candidate for the role. Heston would go on to play More in several stage productions of the play, and ultimately film a television production of it in 1988.
The trial and execution scenes are based very closely on an eyewitness account, published anonymously in the Paris Newsletter of August 4, 1535.
Although it is never mentioned in the film, Lady Alice More was not Margaret More's mother. Before Alice, Sir Thomas More had been married to a woman named Jane Colt, with whom he had four children. After her death, More remarried almost immediately with Alice, who was a widow herself. They did not have any children, but she raised Margaret as her own.
To keep the budget under two million dollars, all the cast members took salary cuts. The only cast members to receive payments over ten thousand pounds, were Orson Welles, Paul Scofield, and Susannah York.
Five of the historical persons depicted in the film all had the first name Thomas: Sir Thomas More, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Thomas Cromwell, Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, and Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk. Perhaps to avoid confusion, in the play and film, the only character referred to as Thomas is Thomas More.
Vanessa Redgrave was originally lined up to play Margaret, but she had theater commitments. Instead, she agreed to do an unpaid cameo as Anne Boleyn, on the condition that it remain unbilled.
The producers originally wanted Sir Laurence Olivier as Thomas More, and Sir Alec Guinness as Wolsey, but Director Fred Zinnemann insisted on Paul Scofield (who had originated his role in the stage play) and Orson Welles in the roles.
One of only four productions to win both the Best Play Tony (1962) and the Best Picture Oscar (1966). The other three are My Fair Lady (1964) (1957/1964), The Sound of Music (1965) (1960/1965), and Amadeus (1984) (1981/1984).
Richard Burton turned down the role of Sir Thomas More, which allowed the part to go to Paul Scofield, winning him the Best Actor Oscar.
Fred Zinnemann, as quoted in his autobiography, calls this the easiest film he ever made, thanks to the extraordinary caliber of the crew and the actors and the way they worked together.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
For his first major film role, Sir John Hurt was paid three thousand pounds.
Peter O'Toole was the first choice to play Henry VIII.
Paul Scofield won the 1962 Tony Award (New York City) for Actor in a Drama for "A Man for All Seasons", and re-created his role in the filmed production, for which he won the Best Actor Oscar.
Paul Scofield and Leo McKern reprised the roles they played in the Broadway production of the play. During most of the play's twenty-month run, the role of Margaret was played by a young Faye Dunaway.
The original play opened at the Globe Theatre (now the Geilgud) in London on July 1, 1960. It was then produced at the ANTA Playhouse (New York City) on November 21, 1961, and played for six hundred thirty-seven performances. Both incarnations starred Paul Scofield.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Filmed over a period of twelve weeks.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This was the only time Robert Shaw and Orson Welles worked together, but in 1970, when Shaw was renting Welles' Madrid home, he accidentally started a fire, which destroyed many of Orson's unfinished scripts and films.
David Warner turned down the role of Rich, as he was busy playing Hamlet at Stratford-upon-Avon, England.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Shaw was paid just fifteen thousand dollars, a big drop from the three hundred fifty thousand dollars he had earned on Battle of the Bulge (1965), but he also received two and a half percent of the profits.
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Shaw became the second actor to be nominated for an Oscar for playing Henry VIII, after Charles Laughton. Later Richard Burton was nominated for playing the monarch too, making this the only role to give rise to three separate nominations.
7 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Eira Heath considered turning her part down because it was so tiny.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Bolt offered the part of Norfolk to his friend, American actor-director John Huston. Huston turned it down.
7 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Richard Harris was considered for the part of Henry VIII.
7 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This is one of Kevin Smith's favorite movies.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In a list submitted to The People's Almanac in the 1970s, John Wayne ranked this as one of the five greatest films of all time.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dirk Bogarde was considered for the role of Sir Thomas More.
6 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Nigel Davenport was offered his role when John Huston turned it down.
5 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Corin Redgrave (Roper) and Vanessa Redgrave (Anne Boleyn) are brother and sister.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sir John Hurt, who was the last surviving member of the main cast, died on January 27, 2017 at age seventy-seven.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Frank Finlay and Bill Travers were offered the role of Thomas More. Finlay turned it down in favor of Paul Scofield (who had created the role on stage) and Travers bowed out to concentrate on Born Free (1966).
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
One of two Best Picture Oscar winners whose title begins with the word "A" (the other is A Beautiful Mind (2001).
8 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Patrick Marley said he filmed his role in two days.
4 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Vanessa Redgrave later played Anne Boleyn's daughter Queen Elizabeth I in Anonymous (2011), in which her daughter Joely Richardson played the younger version of the Queen.
4 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Nicholas Grimshaw was offered a featured role, but confusion over the offer, meant he accepted a stage role instead.
4 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In the first London run of the play, Leo McKern played not Cromwell, but the Common Man, a narrator-figure who addresses the audience, and plays several characters in the story: More's servant Matthew, the man who rows him home, his jailer, and others. These characters also appear in the film, but are played by several cast members. The original stage device of having them all played by the same actor was kept in A Man for All Seasons (1988). In the play, the lines stating what happened to the historical figures after the play's end are spoken by the Common Man. In the film, they are spoken in voice-over at the end by Colin Blakely, who plays Matthew.
4 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Named by Jack Valenti as his all-time favorite film in an AFI poll.
4 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Norman Scace was offered a featured role, but was not free because the dates clashed with a play.
3 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dilys Watling auditioned for a featured role.
3 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Julie Christie was offered the role of Margaret More.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Selected by the Vatican in the "religion" category of its list of 45 "great films".
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the four hundred movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page