IMDb > A Man for All Seasons (1966)
A Man for All Seasons
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A Man for All Seasons (1966) More at IMDbPro »

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A Man for All Seasons -- Trailer for this Oscar winner

Overview

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8.0/10   19,282 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Robert Bolt (from the play by)
Robert Bolt (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for A Man for All Seasons on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
1967 (Japan) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
...a motion picture for all times!
Plot:
The story of Thomas More, who stood up to King Henry VIII when the King rejected the Roman Catholic Church to obtain a divorce and remarriage. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Won 6 Oscars. Another 28 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Fantastically acted, beautifully shot See more (149 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Paul Scofield ... Thomas More

Wendy Hiller ... Alice

Leo McKern ... Cromwell

Robert Shaw ... Henry VIII

Orson Welles ... Cardinal Wolsey

Susannah York ... Margaret

Nigel Davenport ... Duke of Norfolk

John Hurt ... Rich

Corin Redgrave ... Roper
Colin Blakely ... Matthew
Cyril Luckham ... Archbishop Cranmer

Jack Gwillim ... Chief Justice
Thomas Heathcote ... Boatman
Yootha Joyce ... Averil Machin
Anthony Nicholls ... King's Representative
John Nettleton ... Jailer
Eira Heath ... Matthew's Wife
Molly Urquhart ... Maid
Paul Hardwick ... Courtier
Michael Latimer ... Norfolk's Aide
Philip Brack ... Captain of Guard
Martin Boddey ... Governor of Tower
Eric Mason ... Executioner
Matt Zimmerman ... Messenger

Vanessa Redgrave ... Anne Boleyn
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Raymond Adamson ... (uncredited)
Trevor Baxter ... 1st Man (uncredited)
Sylvia Bidmead ... Young Woman (uncredited)
Jack Bligh ... Old Man in Scene 33 (uncredited)
Bridget Brice ... Young Woman (uncredited)
Jan Carey ... 2nd Girl (uncredited)
Gladys Dawson ... Old Woman (uncredited)
Edwin Finn ... 1st Scholar (uncredited)
Laura Graham ... 4th Girl (uncredited)
Raymond Graham ... Academic (uncredited)
Gay Hamilton ... 2nd Handmaiden / 3rd Girl (uncredited)
Fiona Hartford ... 1st Girl / 1st Handmaiden (uncredited)
Drewe Henley ... (uncredited)
Walter Horsbrugh ... 2nd High Court Judge (uncredited)
Ross Hutchinson ... 4th Courier (uncredited)
Donald Layne-Smith ... 2nd Scholar (uncredited)
Graham Leaman ... 1st Monk (uncredited)
Patrick Marley ... 2nd Monk (uncredited)
Julie Martin ... 2th Maid (uncredited)
Robert Mill ... Servant (uncredited)
Robert Morris ... Gentleman Usher (uncredited)
Arnold Peters ... 6th Courier (uncredited)
Christine Pollon ... 1st Woman (uncredited)

Arnold Ridley ... Innkeeper (uncredited)
Iain Sinclair ... 3rd Man (uncredited)

Nick Tate ... Master At Arms (uncredited)
Michael Wade ... 2nd servant / 2nd Young Man (uncredited)
Gina Warwick ... 3rd Handmaiden (uncredited)
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Directed by
Fred Zinnemann 
 
Writing credits
Robert Bolt (from the play by)

Robert Bolt (screenplay)

Produced by
William N. Graf .... executive producer
Fred Zinnemann .... producer
 
Original Music by
Georges Delerue (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Ted Moore (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Ralph Kemplen 
 
Casting by
Robert Lennard (casting)
 
Production Design by
John Box 
 
Art Direction by
Terence Marsh 
 
Makeup Department
Eric Allwright .... makeup
Helene Bevan .... hairdresser (as Helen Bevan)
Gordon Bond .... hairdresser
George Frost .... makeup
 
Production Management
William Kirby .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Peter Bolton .... assistant director
Patrick Carey .... second unit director
Al Burgess .... assistant director (uncredited)
Bill Graf .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Peter Dukelow .... construction manager
Josie MacAvin .... set dresser
Roy Walker .... assistant art director
 
Sound Department
Buster Ambler .... sound
Marcel Durham .... assistant editor
Bob Jones .... sound
Harry Miller .... dubbing editor
 
Stunts
Nosher Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Bob Kindred .... camera operator (as Robert Kindred)
Maurice Gillett .... supervising electrician (uncredited)
Mike Roberts .... camera operator (uncredited)
Robert Willoughby .... special still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Joan Bridge .... colour costume design
Jackie Cummins .... wardrobe
Elizabeth Haffenden .... colour costume design
 
Music Department
Georges Delerue .... music conducted by
 
Other crew
Patrick McLoughlin .... technical adviser
Constance Willis .... continuity
Catherine O'Brien .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
120 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:G | Brazil:Livre | Finland:K-12 | Iceland:L | Singapore:PG | Spain:13 | Sweden:11 | UK:U | UK:U (video rating) (1986) (1998) (2000) | USA:G | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | USA:Approved (original rating) | West Germany:12 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Peter O'Toole was the first choice to play Henry VIII.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When Henry leaves More's estate, he twice indicates that it is eight o'clock. The shadows of most characters between his announcement and actual leaving are very short making it appear to be much closer to noon.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
[first spoken lines are over 6 minutes into the film]
Man:...there's the country every second bastard born is fathered by a priest.
Matthew:[clears throat to get More's attention]
Man:Why, in Utopia, that couldn't be.
Man:But why?
Man:Well, there the priests are very holy.
Man:Therefore, very few.
Sir Thomas More:Is it anything interesting, Matthew?
Matthew:Bless you, sir, I don't know.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

Is'A Man for All Seasons' historically accurate?
See more »
34 out of 41 people found the following review useful.
Fantastically acted, beautifully shot, 14 July 2004
Author: Andrew DiMonte (NoArrow) from My House, Canada

`A Man For All Seasons', much like the film `Becket', is about a man standing up to his king, with tragic results. In this film the man is Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) a well-liked and well-respected lawyer and the king is Henry VIII (Robert Shaw). Henry VIII wants to divorce his wife and marry another, something illegal by the courts of England. But since he is the king and he is fond of executions, practically no one objects, except More, who refuses to believe that anyone is above the law, even his king.

It's not that More objects, rather that he doesn't go along with it. He never says he's against it – because that way he could be charged with treason – but he doesn't sign the new law passed in favor of the king. He could get away with this, of course, but Henry VIII stubbornly refuses to have any opposition, and the rest of the movie is spent on characters trying to persuade More to abide, for this reason or that. There is also a subplot about Richard Rich (a young John Hurt) and Thomas Cromwell (Leo McKern) plotting to frame More to quiet him.

That is what I got from the plot, at least. I could be wrong. It was hard to follow, this film, because of the fast fury of dialogue in each scene, never relenting for the audience to understand. This fast approach to the subject matter wasn't too tedious, but it did prompt me to rewind a few times to hear things over.

That, I am glad to say, is the movie's only flaw. Everything else is wonderful. The acting was great. Scofield creates a sense of pride, duty, confidence and principle with his character that gives him a high, strong presence whenever he's onscreen. His character is complex and in a way simple. Simple: he's refusing to relent not because he believes strongly on the issues of marriage and divorce, but because he believes strongly that no one, not even the king, is above the law. Complex: his strength and duty begins to become self-destructive when he is jailed, his family is made poor and unhappy and he loses respect from most around him, all the while still refusing to conform. An Oscar well deserved.

The rest of the cast rounds out nicely. We have Orson Welles in a small role as the gruff Cardinal Wolsey, Leo McKern using scorn as his technique as Cromwell, Hurt playing a sad role that goes from nice and likable to selfish and nasty, and much others. Ones that stood out for me were Robert Shaw and Wendy Hiller, both Oscar nominated. Shaw is loud, rude, stupid, and in some way likable as the king, it's not his best performance but it is an entertaining one. Hiller, playing More's wife, creates a character whose pride and strength diminishes when her husband is punished, revealing what we least expected: love.

Also, the film is beautifully shot. Its scenery is nice, but how the camera captures it is better. The set direction and costumes are also very impressive, making the film as much a wonder to look at, as it is to watch. And notice how as the movie progresses and More's situation becomes more and more hopeless the tones become muddier; there are more grays and browns than the reds and oranges from early on.

The film won the 1966 Academy Award for Best Picture. I liked `The Sand Pebbles' a little more, but it was still a deserved win in my book. A great picture, made better by Scofield's powerful performance, 8/10.

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