Kenka erejî (1966) - News Poster

(1966)

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All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

Rip Seijun Suzuki, The Anarchic Japanese Auteur Who Inspired Quentin Tarantino and Jim Jarmusch

  • Indiewire
Rip Seijun Suzuki, The Anarchic Japanese Auteur Who Inspired Quentin Tarantino and Jim Jarmusch
“I make movies that make no sense,” Seijun Suzuki would often say, and he wasn’t being modest. The prolific director, who died earlier this month at the age of 93, was the Jackson Pollock of Japanese cinema, an irrepressibly creative artist who painted with gobs of color and geysers of fake blood in order to defy the strictures of narrative and remind viewers that movies are more than the stories they tell.

His hyper-stylized gangster sagas, which had a way of turning the most basic B-picture plots into unfettered symphonies for the senses, were born out of a rabid intolerance for boredom; audiences never knew what was going to happen next, and sometimes it’s tempting to suspect that Suzuki didn’t either. Few directors ever did more to fundamentally demolish our understanding of what film could be, and even fewer did so while working under the auspices of a major production studio.
See full article at Indiewire »

Kore-eda And Huppert Lead Marrakech’s Homage To Japanese Cinema

Marrakech — Hirokazu Kore-eda graced the stage at the Marrakech Film Festival along with Japan’s top filmmakers to receive this year’s homage to Japanese cinema from the hands of French star and jury president Isabelle Huppert on Tuesday evening.

Upon receiving the award, Kore-eda thanked the festival’s president Melita Toscan du Plantier and artistic director Bruno Barde, among other personalities, for putting together an “impressive retrospective of 27 movies that give a glimpse of the best of Japanese cinema.”

The critically acclaimed director, whose latest pic “Like Father, Like Son” won Cannes’ jury prize and ecumenical jury award, spoke more specifically about three movies that have inspired him as a filmmaker.

“First of all, one of the best films I’ve seen in my whole life is ‘Floating Clouds’ by Mikio Naruse, then a film that rejoices me totally each time I see it – even though I don’t
See full article at Variety - Film News »

What’s All The Hulu-baloo About? This Week In Criterion’s Hulu Channel

There are Tons of new releases this past week, and as my co-host and friend Travis George said, it was going to be a hell of a time to write these up for all of you people out there who want to know about Criterion’s blossoming Hulu Plus page. And as usual, I’m elated to tell you all about these films, especially if you want to join up to the service, which helps us keep this weekly article series going. I mean, come on, there’s an Ingmar Bergman film that’s not in the collection yet! More on that at the end of the article. So let’s get right to it then.

The epic film The Human Condition (1959) has been put up, separated into three videos. Parts 1 & 2, Parts 3 & 4 and Parts 5 & 6 are there for your ease of watching, so if you have 574 minutes to kill watching the
See full article at CriterionCast »

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