The Fortune Cookie
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

5 items from 2016


The Seven Greatest Director/Actor Combos

4 September 2016 5:47 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Some actors and directors go together like spaghetti and meatballs. They just gel together in a rare way that makes their collaborations special. Here is a list of the seven best parings of director and actor in film history.

 

7: Tim Burton & Johnny Depp:

 Edward Scissorhands; Ed Wood; Sleepy Hollow; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Corpse Bride; Sweeney Todd; Alice in Wonderland; Dark Shadows

 Of all the parings on this list, these two make the oddest films. (In a good way.) Tim Burton is one of the most visually imaginative filmmakers of his generation and Johnny Depp was once the polymorphous master of playing a wide variety of eccentric characters. They were a natural combo. Depp made most of his best films with Burton, before his current ‘Jack Sparrow’ period began. The duo had the knack for telling stories about misfits and freaks, yet making them seem sympathetic and likable. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


Cleveland According to Movies and Television

19 July 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Our perception of the Forest City having only seen it on screen.

All this week, Cleveland, Ohio, is being overrun with politicians, their supporters, and protestors of their platforms as the Republican National Convention is being held at the Quicken Loans Arena through Thursday. To help get a better sense of this “Cleve-Land,” as Howard the Duck calls it, we’re looking to entertainment, specifically movies and television, for what it can tell us about this city. If there’s anything we miss or misunderstand, blame Hollywood.

Cleveland Rocks

It’s the Rock and Roll Capital of the World, home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it’s not surprising that, to an outsider, Cleveland primarily looks like a city where music reigns. You could make a nice concert with all the fictional bands based there, including Cherry Bomb from Howard the Duck, The Barbusters from Light of Day, the »

- Christopher Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


Hollywood publicist David Horowitz dead at 86

18 July 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The publicist who worked with Barbra Streisand, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones and advised Bill Clinton and Israeli premier Yitzhak Rabin has died at his Los Angeles home. He was 86.

David Horowitz’s wife Lynn confirmed on Monday that the longtime publicist, awards campaign specialist and Civil Rights activist died on July 17.

Horowitz was born on July 21, 1929, in New York City. The family relocated to Miami and then Los Angeles, where he attended UCLA as a pre-med student before finding his way into advertising.

He served as an account executive at The Goodman Organization, handling Warner Bros, United Artists, and American International Pictures. As a unit publicist he worked on Billy Wilder’s Irma La Douce and The Fortune Cookie.

Horowitz’ in-house roles of note included president of corporate entertainment, president of the film division and president of the TV division at Rogers & Cowan. He went to Warner Bros in the 1970s, first as the »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Don’T Bother To Knock (1952)

11 April 2016 9:20 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The icon-establishing performances Marilyn Monroe gave in Howard HawksGentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and in Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959) are ones for the ages, touchstone works that endure because of the undeniable comic energy and desperation that sparked them from within even as the ravenous public became ever more enraptured by the surface of Monroe’s seductive image of beauty and glamour. Several generations now probably know her only from these films, or perhaps 1955’s The Seven-Year Itch, a more famous probably for the skirt-swirling pose it generated than anything in the movie itself, one of director Wilder’s sourest pictures, or her final completed film, The Misfits (1961), directed by John Huston, written by Arthur Miller and costarring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.

But in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952) she delivers a powerful dramatic performance as Nell, a psychologically devastated, delusional, perhaps psychotic young woman apparently on »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


The Strange Case Of Billy Wilder’S Buddy Buddy

20 February 2016 1:40 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Billy Wilder’s Buddy Buddy (1981) might be one of the most obvious go-to examples in the annals of conventional wisdom when it comes to the cinephile’s parlor game of pointing out a great director’s greatest foible. Upon release the movie was summarily dismissed by critics and ignored by audiences—it managed a paltry $7 million domestically, three million less than its production budget.

Roger Ebert, in his review, called Buddy Buddy “a comedy without laughs,” one apparently so vile that it could inspire not only audience indifference but also one of the revered reviewer’s laziest pieces of criticism. Ebert’s short piece quickly degenerates into name-calling-- “This movie is appalling” is the first sentence of the review, and the movie’s name goes unmentioned until the second paragraph—sans much in the way of actual insight. And unfortunately the critic’s disdain ends up functioning as a substitute »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

5 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners