Edit
Fantastic Voyage (1966) Poster

Goofs

Continuity 

The heart rate shown on the monitors, the heart rate heard by the Proteus crew, and the heart rate specified by the technicians aren't even close to matching.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Jump to: Character error (2) | Continuity (8) | Crew or equipment visible (4) | Factual errors (8) | Plot holes (4) | Revealing mistakes (5) | Spoilers (3)

Character error 

When the nurse is fitting the needle to the hypodermic, she is not wearing surgical gloves, although the machine operators are.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Grant is introduced as the man who retrieved Benes and a frogman in "the war." However, Grant was only 8 years old at the beginning of WWII. He would have been closer the the correct age for Korea, however, the Korean Conflict is generally referred to as "Korea" just as a later conflict was just called "Vietnam."
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Continuity 

Two times, people go swimming outside of the Proteus. The first is when Grant, Cora, Duval, and Michaels all go to get air for refueling their air supply. The second is when they go to remove the reticular fibers from the sub's airvents. In both cases, people are seen getting in the tank, the tank filling with water, and then they go outside to do their jobs. Interestingly, in both occurrences, they all come back with perfect hairdos (particularly Cora), with no indication of having gone swimming, like one would from swimming in a pool or in the ocean. (Dr. Michaels could be exempt from this, however, as he is bald.)
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The number on the nose of the Boeing 707 changes from 6746 to 7744.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Grant's car starts to descend on the elevator, it is parked on concrete. When he leaves the car at CMDF, it appears the material has been changed to dirt.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After the Proteus has finished Phase 1 shrinking and is placed in a test tube, it submerges and descends deep into the tube. During the descent there are several shots looking up past the commander toward the surface. Many bubbles can be seen rising and striking the surface a short distance above the sub. In each upward shot the distance to the surface never changes, even though the sub is shown to be descending rapidly in other shots.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
During the briefing session Dr. Michaels shows the room a diagram of the blood clot on the left side of Benes brain, and the left carotid artery where the crew will be injected. Once the operation begins though the needle is injected on Benes right carotid, and all the diagrams thereafter show the Proteus traveling around the right side of his body.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After the opening credits, Grant travels to the shrinking centre in a black Chrysler Imperial, but in the long shot, stock footage of a black Lincoln Continental is used driving along a street. He then arrives in the Imperial.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the Proteus is first injected into Benes' body the pilot's head in the bubble window is clearly seen, but a different camera angle shows the bubble window empty and the pilot missing.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the end when the crew have survived, there is a close up of Dr. Michaels, and he looks relaxed, and relieved; then, in the next shot of him, he's sweating and though he looks relieved, he also looks stressed out.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Crew or equipment visible 

Shadow visible on the right hand wall as the camera pulls back to see the large control room for the first time[widescreen only].
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Wires visible throughout the "swimming" sequences.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Grant is being driven up the ramp at CMDF, a shadow of crew member holding a boom is visible at first turn and another shadow is visible at the top of the ramp just before the camera pulls back.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Wires are visible when the sub is in the lymphatic system just prior to moving to the inner ear. Wires show on the sub, the reticulated fibers, and even on the "invading bodies."
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Factual errors 

The patient's red blood cells, shown in the various scenes of the miniaturized submarine traveling through blood vessels, are nucleated, which is incorrect. Mammalian, and therefore human, red blood cells have no nuclei; nucleated red blood cells are found in most other animals, however, such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, etc.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The amount of radioactive material for the sub would not need a lead carrying case. Grant proves this by removing the container from the case with no protection and handing it to Owens who inserts it into the reactor, again bare-handed.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the crew of the Proteus are refilling their oxygen, they are using a source that has molecules almost equivalent in size to themselves, while the oxygen that was stored on the Proteus prior to reduction would be smaller in relation to themselves - the source oxygen molecules could not physically fit into their tanks.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the outside doctors stopped Benes's heart, the Proteus went through it via the two open valves. This would not be possible though as once the heart stopped the arterial pressure beyond the heart would have caused the semi-lunar valve to close.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Antibodies attack Cora, even though Benes' immune system would never have encountered her before. Antibodies are highly specific to what they bind to, and generally require 5 to 7 days to form against something the immune system has not encountered before.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When taking on oxygen in the lungs, the theory was that the pressure when Dr. Benes inhales would force air into the tanks. Air enters your lungs when you expand your chest cavity. The lower internal pressure causes atmospheric pressure to push air into your lungs. Therefore the pressure in the lungs would be slightly lower than atmospheric pressure. Certainly insufficient to force air into the tanks.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The scuba equipment has a low-pressure hose running between the tank and the face-mask. The face-mask appears to have a regulator built in (the silver disk). The regulator reduces the pressure from the tank to a pressure the diver can breathe. The typical pressure of an open SCUBA system with a regulator tank is 200-300 atmospheres. This would blow out the hose as soon as the air was turned on.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In the movie, defibrillation is used to stop the heart. In the real world, defibrillation is used to treat heart arrhythmia.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Plot holes 

They're cruising around inside the body. Where's all the light coming from?
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
While bringing Benes into the country,after his car is rammed, the agents move him from the damaged car to another one. Once in the car enemy shots are heard. Why wouldn't the snipers fire as Benes was being moved, when they had a clear shot at him?
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The entire opening sequence is fairly far-fetched. If they were sneaking Benes into the country, it's unlikely they'd do it with sirens blaring, troop transports etc. Even if they did, roads would be closed off for blocks, not allowing a stray car to ram the convoy.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
If the crew members can swim from the brain to the eye in around a minute, why didn't they enter from the eye?
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Revealing mistakes 

When the shrunk vessel submerges in the liquid, there are interior shots showing a lot of very small bubbles around the vessel. The depiction of the fluid flow is incorrect. There should be no such small bubbles when such a small object dives as the adhesive forces within the liquid would prevent that. Compared to the shrunk vessel, the bubbles should appear much bigger.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
A slice of Capt. Bill Owens' right side of head is missing in the scene in the vein after the arterial-venous fistula incident, probably due to a mismatched matte. (Approx 44 minutes, 57 seconds into the film)
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As the car disappears down the lift, delivering Grant to CMDF, it should vanish as it is hidden by the hole. Instead the special effects crew elected to shrink the image; we see at least 20 feet of elevation change at the back wall but the car is still visible at foreground. In addition, the car's shadow doesn't change as it should if it was actually moving in relation to the light source.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Before Duval leaves the ship, as he waits for the airlock to fill with fluid, his hair is already wet.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The crewmen reported before the sterilization procedure that Benes' heart rate was 32 beats per minute and it was his respiration that was 6 breaths a minute. But even so, these heart rates were still inconsistent.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers

The goof item below may give away important plot points.

Plot holes 

The sub and crew were miniaturized once so that they could be placed into the over sized syringe. The syringe was presumably full saline fluid. The sub, crew, and the syringe were then shrunk again so that the syringe was 'normal' size and the sub was near microscopic. Everything was only able to stay small for 60 minutes before returning to normal size. What about that HUGE volume of saline fluid that was shrunk? There had to be several gallons of it in the original size of the syringe! Wouldn't Benes blow up like a water balloon with several gallons of saline fluid 'growing' inside him?
The four crew members escaping through the tear duct at the end left the laser behind, which would grow back to its original size inside of Benes' head thereby killing him.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the end, when the "micronauts" escape Benes' body through the tear ducts, there are just the four of them that make it out. As they left the sub and the fifth member of their crew still in the body (their mass admittedly "digested" by a white blood cell but still all within Benes' body) then the body (and perhaps the entire operating room) would be destroyed by that mass returning to its full size - thus killing Benes, whom they were intending to save. (Isaac Asimov's novelization corrects this.) Also, the saline solution that held the sub was also miniaturized, so logically it should have expanded as well.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page