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Django (1966)

Unrated | | Action, Western | December 1966 (USA)
Trailer
1:17 | Trailer

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A coffin-dragging gunslinger and a half-breed prostitute become embroiled in a bitter feud between a Klan of Southern racists and a band of Mexican Revolutionaries.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (story) | 5 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Gen. Hugo Rodriguez (as José Bodalo)
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Nathaniel the Bartender (as Angel Alvarez)
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Brother Jonathan (as Jimmy Douglas)
Simón Arriaga ...
Miguel (as Simon Arriaga)
Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia ...
Klan Member (as Ivan Scratuglia)
Remo De Angelis ...
Ricardo (as Erik Schippers)
Rafael Albaicín ...
Member of Hugo's Gang (as Raphael Albaicin)
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Member of Hugo's Gang (as José Canalecas)
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Storyline

In the opening scene a lone man walks, behind him he drags a coffin. That man is Django. He rescues a woman from bandits and, later, arrives in a town ravaged by the same bandits. The scene for confrontation is set. But why does he drag that coffin everywhere and who, or what, is in it? Written by Michael Lawn <mlawn@attmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A century ago on the low hills along the border between the southern states and turbulent Mexico, a mystery man appeared... a man with a sad, impenetrable face. Who was that man? What was his secret? See more »

Genres:

Action | Western

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

December 1966 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jango  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$6,150 (USA) (21 December 2012)

Gross:

$25,097 (USA) (3 February 2013)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (censored) | (censored)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's film Django Unchained (2012), although it is not a remake of this film, despite the theme song being used in the opening credits and Franco Nero making a cameo opposite Jamie Foxx's Django. See more »

Goofs

With the exception of a sawed-off shotgun used by one of Jackson's men, the firearms shown throughout the film are historically inaccurate for a film set in the years immediately following the American Civil War. These weapons are the Colt Single Action Army (first made in 1873) and Colt New Service (1898) revolvers, Django's machine gun (a fictional model with a barrel based on the 1866-71 Montigny mitrailleuse, but a firing mechanism and belt-fed magazine inspired by the 1895 Maxim gun), and the Winchester 1892, 1894 and 1906 lever-action rifles. See more »

Quotes

Django: [to a gang] A woman shouldn't be treated in that way.
Klan Member: What's that you said?
Django: It's not important. And if I bothered you, would you accept my apology?
[shoots all five]
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Soundtracks

Django (theme)
Lyrics by Franco Migliacci (as Migliacci) and Robert Mellin (uncredited)
Composed by Luis Bacalov (as Enriquez)
Conducted by Bruno Nicolai (uncredited)
Performed by Rocky Roberts
Published by General Music [it]
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User Reviews

django da da deedeedee de dum
22 August 2003 | by (milwaukee) – See all my reviews

Hello y'all. Just would like to add my own little critique of this movie.

Django was probably the first Euro western i'd seen outside of the familiar Leone territory, and, at first i was a little dissapointed. So i watched it again, and again. Then it dawned on me just how cool it was, having been used to the choreographed pyrotechnics of much greater films(ie the leone dollars movies etc) this was a dirty, cold,bitter little movie where nobody really comes out on top, especially the movies protagonist. Yeah, i know he returned to kill and strike again, but this one stands alongside il grande silencio and Keoma as a really good example of a genre theme that would eventually be done to death. So what if it borrows from Leone? Don't forget where he borrowed from in the first place. Anyway, i would just like to say to anyone that has not seen this movie, give it a chance. One final note: in spite of our desensetisation to violence, this is still a stomach churning endeavour, with a body count like a hot day in france, and a sadistic bent that would make peter sutcliffe run for the bathroom, Django reaches parts that only a fistfull of broken fingers can!


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