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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98
Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Dies at 98

'Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Star Eli Wallach Dies at 98
Eli Wallach, the enduring and artful character actor who starred as weaselly Mexican hombres in the 1960s film classics The Magnificent Seven and The Good, The Bad and the Ugly, has died. He was 98. Wallach, who won a Tony Award in 1951 for playing Alvaro in Tennessee Williams’ original production of The Rose Tattoo, made his movie debut as a cotton-gin owner trying to seduce a virgin in Elia Kazan’s Baby Doll (1956) and worked steadily well into his nineties, died Tuesday, his daughter Katherine told The New York Times. No other details of his death were

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Podcast: 2013 Oscar Predictions, 'Snitch' Review and Tons of Games

It's the 2013 Oscar prediction edition of the RopeofSilicon podcast as we prepare for this weekend's Oscar ceremony and live blog. Laremy and I compare predictions and talk a lot of Oscars before reviewing Snitch, taking several of your questions and voicemails and playing a lot of games. I want to remind you that you can call in and leave us your comments, thoughts, questions, etc. directly on our Google Voice account, which you can call and leave a message for us at (925) 526-5763, which may be even easier to remember at (925) 5-bnl-pod. Just call, leave us a voice mail and we'll add those to the show and respond directly. An alternative to that option is a new way of leaving us a voicemail directly from your computer. Just click here and no matter where you live in the world, all you need is a microphone and Internet connection and you can leave us a voicemail.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

DVD Playhouse--June 2009

DVD Playhouse—June 2009

By

Allen Gardner

The International (Sony) An Interpol agent (Clive Owen) joins forces with a Manhattan D.A. (Naomi Watts) to bring down an arms dealing ring and a corrupt global banking cartel that’s funding them. Superlative thriller was oddly ignored by critics and audiences alike, but expertly blends intelligence (courtesy screenwriter Eric Warren Singer’s masterfully-crafted script) and full-throttle action (director Tom Tykwer stages one of the great film shoot-outs in New York’s iconic Guggenheim Museum), making this dynamite thriller reminiscent of the best work from masters such as John Frankenheimer and Robert Aldrich. Armin Mueller-Stahl is wonderful as a world-weary covert op. Bonuses: Extended scene; Featurettes; Trailer. Widescreen. Dolby 5.1 surround.

The Jack Lemmon Film Collection(Sony) Five films from the two-time Oscar winning actor, focusing on his early career: Phfft! is a zippy comedy from 1954, one of Lemmon’s earliest films, in which
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Eastwood Retires From Acting

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Eastwood Retires From Acting
Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood is retiring from acting, after a career spanning more than 50 years.

The 78-year-old had limited acting success in the 1950s, before shooting to fame in the 1960s with roles in hit Western movies such as For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

He went on to star in 1971 classic Dirty Harry and four sequels as hard-edged police inspector Harry Callahan.

Eastwood extended his career in movies to directing - and has received Academy Awards for his work on Unforgiven and Million Dollar Baby.

The director's appeal spanned generations and he is still enjoying success today - with this year's movie Changeling, starring Angelina Jolie, receiving praise from critics and fans alike.

Eastwood has just finished starring in and directing Gran Torino, a drama about a racist veteran of the Korean War - but now that is over, he is hanging up his acting hat for good.

He tells Britain's Sunday Express, "That will probably do it for me as far as acting is concerned.

"You always want to quit while you are ahead. You don't want to be like a fighter who stays too long in the ring until you're not performing at your best."

But the star is adamant he will keep sitting in the director's chair: "I've got no plans to stop making films."

Tarantino Criticism Irritates Italian Film Industry

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American director Quentin Tarantino has angered the Italian movie industry after calling the country's contemporary cinema "depressing." The Grindhouse filmmaker is a well-known admirer of Italian cinema in the '60s and '70s, with a particular love of 'spaghetti' westerns and the giallo thriller genre. Tarantino, whose favourite movie is Sergio Leone's 1969 classic The Good, The Bad & The Ugly, said, "New Italian cinema is just depressing. Recent films I've seen are all the same. They talk about boys growing up, or girls growing up, or couples having a crisis, or vacations of the mentally impaired." Veteran actress Sophia Loren has reportedly hit back, "How dare he talk about Italian cinema when he doesn't know anything about American cinema?"

Score one for Morricone at the Oscars

Score one for Morricone at the Oscars
Ennio Morricone, who has composed more than 300 motion picture scores during a 45-year career, will receive an honorary Oscar from the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The honor will be presented to him Feb. 25 at the 79th Annual Academy Awards "for his magnificent and multifaceted contributions to the art of film music."

Morricone has been nominated five times for best original score -- for Days of Heaven (1978), The Mission (1986), The Untouchables (1987), Bugsy (1991) and Malena (2000) -- but has never taken home an Oscar.

He is best known for his work on such Italian films as Sergio Leone's spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and the epic gangster tale Once Upon a Time in America as well as Giuseppe Tornatore's nostalgic Cinema Paradiso. Morricone also has composed scores for such films as Bulworth, In the Line of Fire, La Cage Aux Folles and Two Mules for Sister Sara. His current project is Tornatore's Leningrad, which is scheduled for a 2008 release.

Score one for Morricone at the Oscars

Score one for Morricone at the Oscars
Ennio Morricone, who has composed more than 300 motion picture scores during a 45-year career, will receive an honorary Oscar from the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The honor will be presented to him Feb. 25 at the 79th Annual Academy Awards "for his magnificent and multifaceted contributions to the art of film music."

Morricone has been nominated five times for best original score -- for Days of Heaven (1978), The Mission (1986), The Untouchables (1987), Bugsy (1991) and Malena (2000) -- but has never taken home an Oscar.

He is best known for his work on such Italian films as Sergio Leone's spaghetti Western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and the epic gangster tale Once Upon a Time in America as well as Giuseppe Tornatore's nostalgic Cinema Paradiso. Morricone also has composed scores for such films as Bulworth, In the Line of Fire, La Cage Aux Folles and Two Mules for Sister Sara. His current project is Tornatore's Leningrad, which is scheduled for a 2008 release.

Cinematographer Delli Colli Dies

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Acclaimed Italian cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli was found dead in his Rome apartment on Wednesday. He was 81. Delli Colli, who received a BAFTA nomination for Once Upon a Time in America, worked on more than 130 movies, including The Good The Bad And The Ugly and Life Is Beautiful, and worked with renowned directors Roman Polanski, Sergio Leone and Federico Fellini. Delli Colli retired in 1997 after working on Roberto Benigni's Oscar-winning film as director of photography. He is survived by his son Stefano.

Tarantino Wishes For a Sergio Leone-Style Career

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Tarantino Wishes For a Sergio Leone-Style Career
Kill Bill director Quentin Tarantino will only feel artistically fulfilled when he's matched the cinematic genius of his idol Sergio Leone. The American movie-maker has been lauded as the most exciting director working in the world today, but he still believes he has a long way to go to leave a lasting legacy. He says, "I think I'm pretty good - but my favorite director is Sergio Leone. Hands down, he's the one who's influenced me most. I think as time goes on I can keep raising the ceiling of my talent and I'm determined to do it to the end of my career, which isn't the case with most directors. I'm not doing a job. This ain't a job. This is an art form. But I can't imagine doing something as perfect as the closing sequence in The Good, The Bad And The Ugly. I will always try to reach that, but I don't think I will ever get there. It is just so cinematically perfect."

Five new categories roll at second Tribeca festival

NEW YORK -- Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal on Thursday unveiled five additional categories in the overall film slate for their second annual Tribeca Film Festival, May 3-11. The new categories are NY, NY; AMC Presents Martin Scorsese's and the Film Foundation's Restored and Rediscovered Classics; Special Screenings; Showcase; and Midnight. NY, NY includes 23 new features and documentary features all shot in New York, while the AMC Presents section will include screenings of Joseph L. Mankiewicz's The Barefoot Contessa; Janet Bergstrom's Murnau's Devils -- Traces of a Film; a restored 180-minute version of Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and the Ugly; a full-length, 229-minute version of Leone's Once Upon a Time in America; and Victor Schertzinger's silent film Redskin, featuring an accompaniment by the Native American musical group National Braid.

Western Director Becomes Rome Landmark

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Western Director Becomes Rome Landmark
The late film director Sergio Leone has had a square in his native Rome named after him. Leone, who died in 1989, was best known for making some of the most famous spaghetti westerns, directing classics such as The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, Once Upon A Time In The West and A Fistful Of Dollars. The ceremony, held by Rome mayor Walter Veltroni, was attended by Ennio Morricone, who composed the scores for many of his films, as well as some of Leone's close friends. His widow, Carla, said her husband would have been "a bit embarrassed because he was very shy".

Stars Go South For Desperado

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Stars Go South For Desperado
Cult director Robert Rodriguez's latest Western is to be a star- studded affair - with Hollywood A-listers Johnny Depp and Willem Dafoe lining up to star opposite Antonio Banderas. Desperado II: Once Upon A Time In Mexico is the follow-on to Rodriguez's classic Banderas and Salma Hayek film Desperado. Hayek, Mickey Rourke and pal Quentin Tarantino have also signed on the dotted line for already-in-production film, said to be based on Sergio Leone's classic The Good, The Bad And The Ugly.

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