Batman: The Movie (1966) - News Poster

News

Every DC Comics Movie Ranked From Worst to Best, Including ‘Justice League’

  • The Wrap
Every DC Comics Movie Ranked From Worst to Best, Including ‘Justice League’
The DC Comics universe hasn’t flooded the big screen the way Marvel ones have, but the DC brand has been hitting the big screen longer in the era of color, starting with the 1966 Adam WestBatman.” We ranked all those modern flicks, from “Batman: The Movie” to “Wonder Woman” and “Justice League.” 31. “Jonah Hex” (2010) Despite the efforts of Josh Brolin and Michael Fassbender, this is one of the worst comic book movies of the modern era. 30. “Superman IV: The Quest for Peace” (1987) Christopher Reeve is by far the best Superman. But “Superman IV” is a bomb in every sense.
See full article at The Wrap »

Batman Vs. Two-Face Release Date Confirmed, Bonus Features Revealed

Last year, Warner Bros. treated us with the awesome Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders, which saw the likes of Adam West, Burt Ward and Julie Newmar reprise their roles of Batman, Robin and Catwoman, respectively. Being essentially the beginning to a fourth season we never received, it surpassed expectations by retaining the feel of the classic 1960’s television series, while also featuring grandiose action scenes that could’ve never been accomplished on the budget of the show.

Having said that, we’re thrilled to see that its sequel, Batman vs. Two-Face, looks like it may be even better. In addition to the return of the aforementioned actors, expect William Shatner to lend his pipes to the dichotomous Harvey Dent, a character who never actually appeared on the TV show itself during its original run.

As for the rest of the major players, here goes: Jeff Bergman (Joker, Bookworm, Desmond Dumas), Sirena Irwin (Dr.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Los Angeles Lights the Bat-Signal in Honor of the Late Adam West

Los Angeles Lights the Bat-Signal in Honor of the Late Adam West
Adam West's iconic legacy as the Caped Crusader was celebrated in Los Angeles on Thursday with an honorary lighting of the Bat-Signal.

The iconic symbol was projected onto the side of L.A. City Hall once night fell, as thousands gathered outside in the street to pay tribute to the late star, who died last Friday at the age of 88.

Watch: Adam West, Star of TV's 'Batman,' Dead at 88

West famously portrayed the beloved comic book hero in the campy, tongue-in-cheek live-action Batman series, which ran from 1966 to 1968. Despite the show only running for three seasons, West appeared in 120 episodes, and it became his defining role.

West also appeared in a feature-length adaptation, of the show, Batman: The Movie, in 1966. While the actor had a hard time getting roles after being typecast as the crime fighter, he went on to embrace the indelible mark he left on the pop culture landscape.

Watch: 'Batman'
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Adam West obituary

Legendary Batman actor struggled to throw off his alter ego in later career but remained beloved of fans

Adam West, who has died aged 88, was one of those actors who had to strive to “live down” not a failure but his greatest success. West, who was synonymous with the role of Batman in the vastly popular, campy TV series of 1966-68, could never escape his alter ego. Although he appeared in scores of films and television series throughout his long career, most reviewers, whatever the role, insisted on referring to him as “TV’s Batman”. However, it is fair to say that West, realising that he owed his fame to the Caped Crusader, was not averse to making oblique allusions to the character in some of his films, and often resorted to self-mockery.

The tall, well-built West, with chiselled good looks and a resonant baritone voice, was perfect casting for
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

A Batman Falls: R.I.P. Adam West

  • Cinelinx
Adam West, who was beloved for generations as the man under the crimefighting cowl in the 1960s Batman TV series, passed away yesterday at the age of 88. West had an acting career going back to the 1950s. Today, Cinelinx pays homage to a gentleman who loved his fans, as we say goodbye to Adam West

Adam West loved playing Batman. Beginning with the Batman Tv show (1966-1969), he continued being involved with DC Batman projects, including Batman: the Movie (1966), The Super Friends (or Super Powers Team), the New Adventures of Batman, Tarzan and the Super Seven, The Legends of the Super heroes, Batman: the Animated Series, the Batman: New Times video game, The 2004-2006 Batman cartoon, Batman: the Brave & the Bold, Robot Chicken, Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders, and the upcoming Batman vs. Two-Face. Through all these projects, for over five decades, West voiced either the Batman or one of his supporting cast.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Every DC Comics Movie Ranked From Worst to Best, Including ‘Wonder Woman’ (Photos)

Every DC Comics Movie Ranked From Worst to Best, Including ‘Wonder Woman’ (Photos)
The DC Comics universe hasn’t flooded the big screen the way Marvel ones have, but the DC brand has been hitting the big screen longer in the era of color, starting with the 1966 Adam WestBatman.” We ranked all those modern flicks, from “Batman: The Movie” to “Wonder Woman.” 31. “Jonah Hex” (2010) Despite the efforts of Josh Brolin and Michael Fassbender, this is one of the worst comic book movies of the modern era. 30. “Superman IV: The Quest for Peace” (1987) Christopher Reeve is by far the best Superman. But “Superman IV” is a bomb in every sense — partly because...
See full article at The Wrap »

Adam West, Star of TV's 'Batman,' Dead at 88

Adam West, Star of TV's 'Batman,' Dead at 88
Adam West, best known for his role in the 1960s TV series Batman, died Friday night in Los Angeles. He was 88. His death was due to a short battle with leukemia.

"It's with great sadness that we are sharing this news...Adam West passed away peacefully last night after a short but brave battle with leukemia," his family confirmed on Facebook. "He was a beloved father, husband, grandfather, and great-grandfather. There are no words to describe how much we'll miss him. We know you'll miss him too and we want you to know how much your love and support meant to him throughout the years. Hug your loved ones today. - The West Family."

Exclusive: 'Batman' Co-Star Julie Newmar Remembers Adam West: 'He Had It All'

Born in Walla Walla, Washington, West rose to fame for portraying the role of Bruce Wayne on TV. Although it was majorly popular, it only lasted
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Marc Alan Fishman: Is Lego Batman The Best Batman Ever?

  • Comicmix
This past weekend my wife and I tried to be adults, but Fandango’s inexplicable Ui rendered my better/prettier/sexier/amazinger half confuzzled. The tickets we purchased to see “Split” by M. Night Shamalamadingdong were for the wrong date (as in three days prior to when we were currently out). D’oh! Mistakes happen, no biggie. But with a sitter on the clock, and time dwindling, we opted instead to catch “Get Out” by Jordan Peele. Until we noticed that the entire theater was sold out — save for two seats not together. And boy, it’d be a hindrance to a date night to not sit together.

So we saw “Lego Batman.” It would be the second time I’d seen it in as many weeks.

I won’t bury the lede: “Lego Batman” is amazing. It’s a visual and auditory roller coaster that nearly never comes up for air.
See full article at Comicmix »

The Other Onscreen Crime-Fighting Career of Lego Batman

The Other Onscreen Crime-Fighting Career of Lego Batman
The strangest thing about The Lego Batman Movie might be the fact that it's not the first Lego Batman movie, but the seventh — and that's not counting the 2014 Lego Movie. Welcome to the secret history of the blockhead Dark Knight.

The very first Lego Batman movie came out in 2013, a year before The Lego Movie, and was a direct-to-dvd spinoff of the popular video game franchise that launched all the way back in 2008. Lego Batman: The Movie was enough of a success that, like its video game inspiration, a number of sequels followed — but unlike...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Lego Batman Movie: references and Easter Egg guide

David Crow Feb 13, 2017

The movie, TV show, cartoon and comic references of The Lego Batman Movie...

This article contains major The Lego Batman Movie spoilers.

Holy plastic building blocks, Batman! Almost everything really was awesome about The Lego Batman Movie. After years of dark nights and grim glares at other superheroes, the newest adventure of the Caped Crusader, as voiced by Will Arnett’s perfectly overdone gravel, was a breath of fresh air. Not afraid to let Batman’s sidekicks have fun - even if our cantankerous main guy still prefers to wear only black and sing about “darkness” - The Lego Batman Movie is poised to entertain Bat-fans of all Bat-ages.

Still one of its best gags is its shameless (and relentless) use of references, cutaways, and in-jokes to overstuff its narrative with more meta-humor than the most unwieldy episode of Community. As a consequence, it’s easy to
See full article at Den of Geek »

Santa Barbara Raises Curtain on Restoration Project at Star-Studded Fest

Santa Barbara Raises Curtain on Restoration Project at Star-Studded Fest
Santa Barbara became a movie town in 1912, when the American Film Co., aka the Flying A, set up shop there. The studio began cranking out shorts at a rapid pace, producing an estimated 1,200 silent movies before its demise in 1921.

But Santa Barbara’s showbiz embrace didn’t end there: It has long served as a favored tryout city, film and TV location, and industry playground.

Since 1986, the coastal community 89 miles north of Hollywood has also been home to the Santa Barbara Intl. Film Festival. The festival, which kicks off Feb. 1, will feature a jam-packed lineup of premieres, starry events, and panel discussions. In a nod to Santa Barbara’s storied past, the fest will also serve as the formal curtain-raiser of its major capital project, the renovation of the city’s historic Riviera Theater.

The Riviera Theater, recently acquired by the Sbiff through a 30-year lease, has long been symbolic
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DC Comics week: The biggest accomplishments of the Arrowverse

It would be an understatement to say that DC Comics has had a slightly hard time effectively adapting their vast library of characters to the big screen. Whether you adored Ben Affleck’s Batman, loathed Jared Leto’s Joker, or simply wish that Henry Cavill’s Superman would talk more, the reception has definitely been mixed when it comes to the Dceu.

However, one thing that fans are universally agreed on when it comes to DC’s current live action media output, is that television has been a far more successful medium for the company. Following the monumental ten year run of the CW’s Smallville, several characters from the pages of DC Comics have also made the jump to the small screen.

While Smallville was incredibly successful in a number of different ways, it’s biggest mistake was not allowing Clark Kent to fully embrace his destiny as Superman for an entire decade.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The evolution of the Batman suit on screen from 1943 to 2017

Luke Owen looks back at Batman’s past…

As Saturday was Batman Day [you can read two other op-eds here and here] and following on from my look back at the evolution of Spider-Man and Daredevil‘s costumes (and the Batmobile), I thought it would be fun to look back at all the big screen and (some of ) the small screen versions of everyone’s favourite Dark Knight. Starting from the serials in the 1940s all the way through to Zack Snyder’s Batman who brands people.

But what makes the Bat Suit so iconic? Is it the emblem on his chest? Is it the cowl? Is it the colour scheme? Or is it all of the above. Let’s find out.

1943: Lewis Wilson (Batman)

Wilson starred in the 15-chapter serial Batman against Douglas Croft as Robin, which saw the Dynamic Duo as U.S. secret agents taking down Dr. Dako during World War II. The costume is fairly modest,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Newswire: R.I.P. Leslie H. Martinson, director of Batman: The Movie

Though he’s often left out of conversations comparing the disparate visions filmmakers have had for Batman, Leslie H. Martinson Biff! Pow!-ed everyone to the punch with 1966’s Batman: The Movie, the first feature-length realization of the character, made long before Tim Burton, Joel Schumacher, Christopher Nolan, Zack Snyder, and increasing layers of grit entered the picture. Variety reports that Martinson—a prolific TV and film director with more than 100 credits to his name—died on Sept. 3 at the age of 101.

Batman: The Movie, like the Adam West-starring series it’s based on, presented a campy, self-aware Caped Crusader, one that satirized both superheroes and the Day-Glo ’60s culture that surrounded it. Few would probably regard it as a good movie; it’s silly and schlocky, and riddled with groaning wordplay and garish aesthetics not even Schumacher would attempt. However, it’s remained a ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Leslie H. Martinson, Prolific TV and ‘Batman’ Movie Director, Dies at 101

Leslie H. Martinson, Prolific TV and ‘Batman’ Movie Director, Dies at 101
Leslie H. Martinson, the prolific television director who is best known for helming the 1966 film “Batman: The Movie” has died. He was 101.

His family confirmed the death in a posting that said he died at home on Saturday, Sept. 3 of natural causes.

A native of Boston, Martinson started his career working for the Boston Evening Transcript before he started working as a script clerk at MGM in 1936.

Over the course of his long career, Martinson picked up over 100 directing credits, mostly for TV shows in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. He is responsible for episodes of “Maverick,” “The Brady Bunch,” “CHiPs,” “Diff’rent Strokes,” and many others.

While Martinson only directed two episodes of the wildly popular 1966 “Batman” TV show, (“The Penguin Goes Straight” and “Not Yet, He Ain’t”) he was asked to direct the movie that same year. He would also helm episodes of other superhero shows “The Green Hornet” and “Wonder Woman.”

Martinson
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Leslie H. Martinson Dies: Prolific TV & Film Director Was 101

Leslie H. Martinson, who directed dozens of TV shows as well as feature films, including Batman: The Movie, has died. He was 101. His family announced that Martinson died September 3 of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles. Martinson began his career as a newspaper journalist before moving on to MGM as a script clerk in 1936. After serving in World War II, he began directing TV Western series in the early 1950s. He helmed the first of Mickey Rooney’s three failed…
See full article at Deadline TV »

‘Batman: Return Of The Caped Crusaders’ Trailer: Adam West and Burt Ward Lend Their Voices to the Dynamic Duo

‘Batman: Return Of The Caped Crusaders’ Trailer: Adam West and Burt Ward Lend Their Voices to the Dynamic Duo
Back in 1966 Adam West became one of the first Batman’s to grace our screens, with Burt Ward alongside as his trusty sidekick, Robin. Now the Gotham City duo have returned to reprise their superhero roles, but this time without putting on the tights.

The first trailer for the animated DC film, “Batman: Return Of The Caped Crusaders,” has just been released and features the voices of West and Ward as the dynamic duo going up against their fiendish foes.

In the clip, Batman and Robin must stop their greatest opponents which include Catwoman, the Joker, the Riddler and Penguin. The goofy, retro-looking sneak peek includes silly jokes and scenes and features the catchy and unforgettable Batman theme song.

Read More: ‘The Lego Batman Movie’ Trailer: Sdcc Footage Showcases Zach Galifianakis as the Joker and Michael Cera as Robin

“Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders” also features Julie Newmar as
See full article at Indiewire »

Jared Leto on succeeding Heath Ledger as The Joker in Suicide Squad

In a week from now, Warner Bros. and DC will unleash their latest take on The Joker with Jared Leto’s portrayal of the Clown Prince of Crime in the DC Extended Universe supervillain team-up Suicide Squad. Leto has of course some rather large shoes to fill – including Heath Ledger’s Oscar-winning turn in 2008’s The Dark Knight – and the actor has been chatting to Rolling Stone about following that iconic performance.

“Heath did an impeccable, perfect performance as the Joker,” said Leto, who becomes the fourth actor to play The Joker in live-action on the big screen after Cesar Romero (Batman: The Movie), Jack Nicholson (Batman) and Ledger. “It’s one of the best performances ever in cinema. I had met Heath before. I didn’t know him well, but he was a beautiful person. I think had it only been portrayed by Heath and it was never a comic book,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Retro 1980s Fan Petition to Have Michael Keaton Removed as Batman in Tim Burton’s Film

The initial casting of Michael Keaton as Bruce Wayne/Batman in the 1989 Tim Burton-directed film was quite an unexpected surprise for some fans back in the day. I can see how it would have been hard to imagine Keaton as the Dark Knight, but as you all know, he ended up being awesome in the role and he was the perfect choice to take it on.

Some of the more hardcore Batman fans at the time were incredibly upset by the casting and they actually started a petition in the late 1980s to have Keaton removed from the role of Batman. Knowing what we know now, the petition is pretty damn funny. Here’s what it says:

It has recently been announced that the actor Michael Keaton has been chosen to play the Batman in the big budget film being directed by Tim (Beetlejuice) Burton for release in 1989 (the
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Edinburgh 2016: Kevin & Harley Quinn Smith Part One - Cam-Girl Controversy!

Regardless of what you think of his movies, Kevin Smith makes one hell of a festival guest. Before I even sat down with him for this interview I'd seen the man put in several performances around Edinburgh; at his sold-out show, before each of his movie screenings, and I even heard he turned up at the retrospective screening of 1966’s Batman: The Movie. Going beyond the call of duty, Smith commonly went well over schedule as he talked movies and answered questions from fans. Covering the length and breadth of his career, from production tales to comic books, Smith made a point of ending every appearance with an inspirational message on self-expression and creativity. The films brought to the festival were, of course, his two...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites