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Alice in Wonderland (1966) (TV) More at IMDbPro »

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Release Date:
28 December 1966 (UK) See more »
Genre:
User Reviews:
Alternative 'Alice' See more (30 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Anne-Marie Mallik ... Alice
Freda Dowie ... Nurse
Jo Maxwell Muller ... Alice's Sister (as Jo Maxwell-Muller)
Wilfrid Brambell ... White Rabbit

Alan Bennett ... Mouse

Finlay Currie ... Dodo
Geoffrey Dunn ... Lory
Mark Allington ... Duck
Nicholas Evans ... Eaglet
Julian Jebb ... Young Crab

Michael Redgrave ... Caterpillar (as Sir Michael Redgrave)
John Bird ... Frog Footman
Anthony Trent ... Fish Footman / 2nd Gardener (as Tony Trent)

Leo McKern ... Duchess
Avril Elgar ... Peppercook

Peter Cook ... Mad Hatter

Michael Gough ... March Hare
Wilfrid Lawson ... Dormouse (as Wilfred Lawson)
Gordon Gostelow ... 1st Gardener
Peter Eyre ... Knave of Hearts
Alison Leggatt ... Queen of Hearts

Peter Sellers ... King of Hearts

John Gielgud ... Mock Turtle (as Sir John Gielgud)
Malcolm Muggeridge ... Gryphon
David Battley ... Executioner
Charles Lewsen ... Foreman of the Jury (as Charles Lewson)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Eric Idle ... Young Man (uncredited)
Angelo Muscat ... Queen's Servant (uncredited)

Directed by
Jonathan Miller 
 
Writing credits
Lewis Carroll (novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland")

Jonathan Miller  teleplay (uncredited)

Produced by
Jonathan Miller .... producer
 
Original Music by
Ravi Shankar 
 
Cinematography by
Dick Bush 
 
Film Editing by
Pam Bosworth 
 
Production Design by
Julia Trevelyan Oman 
 
Costume Design by
Kenneth Morey 
 
Makeup Department
Eileen Mair .... makeup artist
 
Sound Department
Stephen Dalby .... dubbing mixer (as Steven Dalby)
John Murphy .... sound recordist
Brian Simmons .... assistant sound recordist
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert Daly .... lighting technician
Sydney Marker .... grip
Phil Meheux .... assistant camera (as Philip Méheux)
 
Editorial Department
Dan Rae .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Leon Goossens .... musician: oboe
Ravi Shankar .... musician
 
Other crew
Jean Braid .... title designer
Lewis Carroll .... original drawings: closing credits
Sheila Lally .... assistant to director
Fraser Lowden .... assistant to director (as Frazer Lowden)
Tony Palmer .... assistant to director
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Runtime:
72 min (25 fps)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
All the big name stars acted in this program for scale.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the scenes with the Mock Turtle, his legs are crossed in all the long shots, but in close-up shots, his legs are in a completely different position; without there being enough time to have changed them from one shot and another.See more »
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17 out of 18 people found the following review useful.
Alternative 'Alice', 4 October 2004
Author: Eugene Kim (gene_kim@earthlink.net) from Arlington, Virginia, USA

Beautifully filmed in a satiny black & white reminiscent of old photographs, this 1966 BBC adaptation of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" may displease purists for its less than conventional, as well as decidedly minimalist, approach. It's not a traditional rendering of Lewis Carroll, and doesn't pretend to be; there are no phantasmagoric sets or actors encased in over-sized costumes or big musical numbers or fancy photographic effects. The Alice of this production is a taciturn, stony-faced girl who is neither frightened nor fascinated by her experiences in Wonderland, which is mostly made up of the interiors and exteriors of old English mansions and houses. But in its unorthodox way, it brings Carroll's text to life in a way I don't recall experiencing in other adaptations of the Alice books.

It's apparent that in creating this alternative Alice, producer-director Jonathan Miller expects you to be already familiar with its source; he's evidently assuming you will recognize what he's chosen to leave in as well as leave out, as well as his re-imagined settings. Only a few of the actors are made to look anything like the characters in the Tenniel drawings, such as Leo McKern as the Duchess or Peter Cook as the Mad Hatter; you're basically on your own when it comes to spotting the White Rabbit or Caterpillar or Frog Footman, all of whom are dressed "normally" in period costumes. (Presenting the Carrollian characters as real people isn't a new idea; I recall a TV adaptation of Alice starring Kate Burton in which Humpty Dumpty was portrayed by an elderly man in a rocking chair.)

By tossing out entire scenes, characters and exchanges that were in the book, Miller gives us a sparer, edgier retelling of the Wonderland story, but doesn't stray too far from the original. Why such a sullen, passive Alice? My guess is, this is supposed to be an Alice who fully realizes that she's in a dream and treats her surroundings accordingly.

And so this Alice (played by a charming Anne-Marie Mallik) sits looking bored and disinterested during the Mad Tea Party. Other productions customarily play this scene with all kinds of manic energy, but in this film, the tea party is deliberately drawn out with long, open rhythms reminiscent of an Antonioni or Resnais film. (Alice's Adventures in Marienbad, anyone?) And seemingly for the first time, while I was listening to the Mad Hatter, the March Hare and the Dormouse prattle away, their nonsense started to make wonderful sense. It's easy enough for an actor to recite lines like, "What day of the month is it?," but here, the performers sound like they really mean what they say (and say what they mean).

That same emphasis on dialogue is apparent in the beach scene with the Mock Turtle, played by Sir John Gielgud, and the Gryphon, played by Malcolm Muggeridge. The Mock Turtle's words never sounded so delightful to me before, and thank goodness Gielgud didn't have to deliver them through some huge Mock Turtle mask. This scene also provides one of the movie's most striking images, of the Mock Turtle, the Gryphon and Alice walking barefoot along the shore, with Gielgud softly singing the "Lobster Quadrille" a cappella.

For those seeking a more conventional book-to-film translation of "Alice," I would suggest the 1972 British movie musical starring Fiona Fullerton, complete with elaborate sets and costumes and velvety color photography and songs. Although it was slammed by the relatively few reviewers who saw it, I thought it nicely conveyed a dreamlike quality of its own, especially in its transitions - I found it much more enjoyable than the 1933 Paramount movie or the 1951 Disney animated feature.

But if you think you've had your fill of Alice movies and TV shows, then I urge you to try this one - I think it makes Lewis Carroll sound fresh all over again. (There's very interesting musical accompaniment by Ravi Shankar.) And for a wonderfully acted movie about the real- life Alice Liddell Hargreaves and Lewis Carroll, I urge you to see "Dreamchild" - but that's another review.

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more realistic than other versions. bcurran05
This is Alice In Wonderland to me rollerbaby520
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