IMDb > "Ultraman: A Special Effects Fantasy Series" (1966)
"Urutoraman: Kûsô tokusatsu shirîzu"
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"Ultraman: A Special Effects Fantasy Series" (1966) More at IMDbPro »"Urutoraman: Kûsô tokusatsu shirîzu" (original title), TV series 1966-1967

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Overview

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7.7/10   196 votes »
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Up 14% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Mamoru Sasaki (several episodes)
Shin'ichi Sekizawa (pilot)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Ultraman: A Special Effects Fantasy Series on IMDbPro.
Seasons:
1
Release Date:
17 July 1966 (Japan) See more »
Plot:
A human member of a defense force is given the life and ability to change into a giant super-hero to battle the monsters he encounters. Full summary »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Sublime Wacked Out Monster Show - That's a Compliment! See more (3 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast Summary - 7 of 8)
Susumu Kurobe ... Shin Hayata (39 episodes, 1966-1967)
Sandayû Dokumamushi ... Daisuke Arashi (39 episodes, 1966-1967)
Masanari Nihei ... Mitsuhiro Ide (39 episodes, 1966-1967)
Bin Furuya ... Ultraman (39 episodes, 1966-1967)

Corinne Orr (39 episodes, 1966-1967)
Hiroko Sakurai ... Akiko Fuji (38 episodes, 1966-1967)
Akiji Kobayashi ... Captain 'Cap' Toshio Muramatsu (38 episodes, 1966-1967)
(more)

Series Directed by
Akio Jissoji (6 episodes, 1966-1967)
Hajime Tsuburaya (4 episodes, 1967)
Yuzo Higuchi (3 episodes, 1966-1967)
Toshihiro Iijima (2 episodes, 1966-1967)
Samaji Yanagase (2 episodes, 1967)
 
Series Writing credits
Tetsuo Kinjô (unknown episodes)
Mamoru Sasaki (unknown episodes)
Shin'ichi Sekizawa (unknown episodes)

Series Produced by
Eiji Tsuburaya .... supervising producer (unknown episodes)
 
Series Original Music by
Kunio Miyauchi (unknown episodes)
 
Series Cinematography by
Yasumichi Fukuzawa (unknown episodes)
Masaharu Utsumi (unknown episodes)
 
Series Art Direction by
Tôru Narita (unknown episodes)
 
Series Special Effects by
Sadamasa Arikawa .... special effects supervisor (unknown episodes)
Tetsu Matoba .... special effects supervisor (unknown episodes)
Koichi Takano .... special effects supervisor (unknown episodes)
Hajime Tsuburaya .... special effects supervisor (unknown episodes)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial Effects

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Urutoraman: Kûsô tokusatsu shirîzu" - Japan (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
30 min (39 episodes)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The character of Ultraman went through many changes as pre-production went along. At first, the planned series "Woo" had a corporeal space creature with eyes, who befriended a reporter named Jôji Akita, but the Self Defense Forces were after him. This was basically the monster version of "Doctor Who" (1963), and Woo's personality was comical. Then they planned "Bemular" (retitled "Science Patrol - Bemular") about a defense force disguised as an art/photography team. One of the members, little did anyone know, gained the ability to transform into a giant birdlike humanoid monster called Bemular (this is not the same Bemular that Ultraman would fight in Episode 1), who defends Earth from monsters, aliens and other threats. Unlike Woo, Bemular was a tough and righteous fighter (Bemular looked very similar in design to the title monster of Daikyojû Gappa (1967)). This then evolved into "Redman," the title hero of which slightly resembled Ultraman as we know him, but he looked more demonic and had horns. Both Bemular and Redman were designed by Tôru Narita, who came up with the final design for Ultraman based on his Redman design, now resembling a less-scary Buck Rogers-style alien being (with a bit of the iconic "Roswell Alien" as well). The characteristic "ColorTimer" (the "warning light" on his chest) was added at the eleventh hour.See more »
Quotes:
Narrator:Using his beta capsule, Hayata becomes Ultraman!See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Urutoraman no UtaSee more »

FAQ

In what episode did Ultraman's costume receive an upgrade?
See more »
6 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
Sublime Wacked Out Monster Show - That's a Compliment!, 29 April 2005
Author: Chung Mo from NYC

The first giant robot Japanese Sci-Fi TV show has something that all the others (Ultraman sequels included) never achieved. It's set in a world of bizarre logic and weird film making that is hard to describe. Unlike American television shows, Ultraman seemed to be played for laughs, very strange laughs, but laughs none the less. Don't expect the self-conscious humor of Batman but a world where people say and do odd things, the plot lines take goofy turns and characters will suddenly turn to the camera and talk to you as if nothing strange is happening at all.

In one episode, the main characters (members of the "Science Patrol" in the Amrican translation) are sent out to find nuclear bombs that fell off a wayward space mission (!) and sank to the bottom of the sea. Unfortunately a sea creature found one of the bombs first and mutates into a giant monster (resembling the Creature from the Black Lagoon) that sinks boats and attacks ocean resorts. All the time a nuclear bomb is stuck on the monster's shoulder. The Science Patrol has the brilliant idea to sooth the enraged beast with music so they get the Japanese Coast Guard to play classical music from a destroyer! This has the opposite effect as the monster rips up and hurls trees around. One member of the Science Patrol make the incredible observation, "The monster doesn't like music, turn it off!". The show stops as the main characters try to figure out why their plan didn't work since "all wild beasts are soothed by music"! It's decided that radiation is the cause of the monster's inability to appreciate fine music!

If you are looking for "rational" entertainment, run far as you can from Ultraman. For the rest of us who enjoy goofy fun, you can't get better then this. The new DVD set has the original Japanese track which has increased my admiration for this show.

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