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Till Death Us Do Part (TV Series 1965–1975) Poster

(1965–1975)

Trivia

Left-wing writer Johnny Speight said he wrote the series as a critique on right-wing, working-class bigots such as Garnett. However, many viewers let Speight and Warren Mitchell know they agreed with the character's views. Black comedian Lenny Henry argued that while the series was well-intentioned, having a central character such as Garnett spout prejudice on national television did actually provide fuel for racist bigotry in society.
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Lionel Jeffries turned down the role of Alf Garnett.
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Warren Mitchell was less than six years older than Anthony Booth, who played his son-in-law. Booth's year of birth was often incorrectly given as 1937, but he was actually born in 1931.
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The series was the subject of much criticism by morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse, not because of Garnett's racial prejudice but because of his frequent use of the exclamation "bloody". She even counted the number of uses of the word per episode. The BBC attempted to ration the swear words to six "bloody"s per show. The attempt failed.
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Pilot episode was written as part of the BBC Comedy Playhouse series.
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Alf sometimes referred to son-in-law Mike as a "randy Scouse git" (roughly translated as a horny slacker from Liverpool). Monkee Micky Dolenz heard the phrase when he visited England and watched the series, and made it the title of a song (appearing on the "Headquarters" album) that he wrote about the trip. When "Headquarters" was released in the UK, the record company objected to the use of the phrase (which didn't appear in the lyrics), because it was actually somewhat taboo to the British audience, and a minor scandal broke out. RCA Victor insisted Dolenz give an alternate title for the song, and he complied by calling it simply "Alternate Title". While no singles were issued from "Headquarters" in the US, a single of "Alternate Title" was issued in the UK, and became a hit in the wake of the scandal.
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Nobody is sure how the show's title was spelled on screen in the early episodes which are now lost. Some BBC sites refer to it as "Till Death Us Do Part", some as "Til Death Us Do Part", some also include the apostrophe at the start to make the first word the contraction of "Until". Johnny Speight has used both spellings, "Till" and "Til" when he's written about the series.
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Leo McKern was the original choice for the role of Alf Garnett.
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There is now a eight disc box set containing all episodes. All surviving episodes and audio of black and white in a separate disc. Includes a booklet.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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