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(1966–1967)

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Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’
Lyon The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Celebrating 45 Years of King Boxer

Craig Lines Sep 6, 2017

45 years on, we revisit King Boxer, and find a genuinely great martial arts movie...

Asian martial arts are now deeply embedded in western pop culture, but this wasn’t always the case. In fact, it wasn’t really until the early 1970s that they made the transition into the mainstream, thanks in no small part to the release of a film called King Boxer. Of course, nothing occurs in a vacuum. By the late 1960s, martial arts were already being taught more widely in the west. Bruce Lee was making waves with his role in The Green Hornet (although his martial arts films, while huge in Hong Kong, were yet to break the Us market). James Bond had a ninja encounter in 1967’s You Only Live Twice. Kung Fu, the seminal ABC series starring David Carradine, hit TVs across America in 1972. The west was primed and ready
See full article at Den of Geek »

It’s time for us to admit that Batman ’66 was awesome

Luke Owen with some thoughts about Batman ’66…

Following the tragic passing of Adam West over the weekend I’ve been thinking a lot about Batman ’66, the TV show that entertained millions of children at the tail-end of the swingin’ sixties. Like many, it was my introduction to the character, and it genuinely might be my favourite iteration. I adore Tim Burton’s Batman ’89 and have mixed feelings about Batman Returns. I’m one of the few who likes Batman Forever, and I recently wrote about my appreciation of Batman & Robin. Batman Begins is one of the finest comic book movies ever made, I can take or leave The Dark Knight and I have no time for The Dark Knight Rises. I may not be keen on the direction Zack Snyder took The Caped Crusader in Batman v Superman: Dawn of the Justice, but I will admit that Ben Affleck was great in the role.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Adam West, T.V's Batman, Dead At Age 88

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Adam West, one of the most enduring pop culture figures of the 1960s, has passed away at age 88 after a battle with leukemia. West was a hunky young actor laboring in bit parts in films such as "The Young Philadelphians", "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" and co-starring with the Three Stooges in their last feature film "The Outlaws is Coming!" when he got the opportunity to audition for the role of Batman in ABC's new TV series. The essence of the show was that it would be played as a broad comedy. West impressed the producers with his ability to pretend his character wasn't in on the joke. West played Batman and his alter ego Bruce Wayne as stalwart, incorrupt heroes. He approved young Burt Ward to play the role of Robin despite not having any previous acting experience. The show, which premiered in January 1966, took off like
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Sunset in the West

This charming Roy Rogers oater could reboot interest in vintage ‘series’ westerns. Basically a film for little kids, it’s earnestly played by all concerned and director William Witney’s direction sparkles. The added filip that makes the difference is the beautifully restored Trucolor image — Roy’s wonder horse Trigger is indeed magnificent. I listened carefully, but I don’t think Roy actually says, “Yippie-ki-yay, M_____f____r.”

Sunset in the West

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1950 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 67 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 19.95

Starring: Roy Rogers, Trigger, Estelita Rodriguez, Penny Edwards, Gordon Jones, Will Wright, Pierre Watkin, Charles La Torre, William Tannen, Gaylord Pendleton, Paul E. Burns, Dorothy Ann White, Riders of the Purple Sage.

Cinematography: Jack Marta

Color by Trucolor

Film Editor: Tony Martinelli

Original Music: R. Dale Butts

Special Effects: Howard & Theodore Lydecker

Written by Gerald Geraghty

Produced by Edward J. White

Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Here Are Some Of The Directors Rumored To Be In Line To Replace Ben Affleck On The Batman

Last night brought the extremely disappointing news that Ben Affleck would no longer be directing Warner Bros. solo Batman movie, though he is remaining on board as producer and will still reprise the role of Bruce Wayne/The Dark Knight after making his debut in Batman V Superman. Following the announcement, Forbes published a lengthy report on how Affleck's departure could potentially influence the project, and they also mention some of the names that are apparently high on the studio's list of possible replacements. Matt Reeves, we know about, but we also have Gavin O’Connor, Denis Villeneuve, Matt Ross, and George Miller. Villeneuve really seems more like wishful thinking, as following Blade Runner 2049 he'll have his hands full with the Dune reboot. Miller was said to be one of the names in contention to helm Man of Steel 2, so it makes sense that he'd still be in the mix.
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

Good Links Revolt

Autostraddle "How to Dress like Cate Blanchett's Oceans 8 Character Who is Definitely Queer, Right?"

Comics Alliance Pixar's Coco gets concept art and a voice cast - Gael García Bernal!

Sydney Morning Herald Australia's own version of the Oscars goes big for Mel Gibson's Hacksaw Ridge with 9 wins from its 13 nominations.

The New Yorker "the fate of cinephilia in the age of streaming"

Awards Daily interviews the production design team on Loving

EW Ryan Reynolds as Entertainer of the Year

Boy Culture Hunky Van Williams, discovered by Liz Taylor of people, who came to fame on TV's The Green Hornet has died at 82. His last movie role was as homage to his friend and co-star Bruce Lee in Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story (1993)

The Wrap Madonna raises $7 million for Malawi with a little help from Sean Penn who she offers to marry again

THR Harsh words for Amazon with
See full article at FilmExperience »

Fanatic Feed: TV's Green Hornet Dies, Luke Cage Renewed & More

  • TVfanatic
The news today includes some premiere dates, a renewal, and an announcement of an awards host.

But first, a bit of sad news. 

TV's Green Hornet, Van Williams, died at the age of 82.

The short-lived series aired as a companion to Batman in the 1960s. One of the things that made the series memorable was hailed martial artist Bruce Lee playing the manservant, Kato, to Britt Reid, the editor/publisher who masqueraded as the Green Hornet.

Before joining The Green Hornet, Williams played private eyes on Bourbon Street Beat and Surfside 6.

Williams retired from acting altogether in 1982 after guest starring roles in such shows as The Rockford Files and The Streets of San Francisco.

He's survived by his wife of 57 years, Vicki, and three daughters, Nina, Tia and Britt.

Just 12 weeks before the Oscars telecast, Jimmy Kimmel has been chosen to host the 2017 Academy Awards presentation on ABC.

Kimmel
See full article at TVfanatic »

Van Williams, Star of The Green Hornet, Dies at 82: Report

  • PEOPLE.com
Van Williams, Star of The Green Hornet, Dies at 82: Report
Van Williams, star of the 1960s action sci-fi series The Green Hornet, has died, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 82.

Born Van Zandt Jarvis Williams on Feb. 27, 1934 in Forth Worth, Texas, the actor passed away Nov. 29 of kidney failure in Scottsdale, Arizona where he lived with his wife of 57 years, Vicki Flaxman Richards.

Williams grew up on a ranch outside Fort Worth and later studied animal husbandry and business at Texas Christian University. When he and his father wrangled over ranch policy, Van lit out for the wide open spaces of Hawaii in 1956. It was there, while working as
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Van Williams, TV’s Green Hornet, Dies at 82

  • The Wrap
Van Williams, TV’s Green Hornet, Dies at 82
Van Williams, who played the title character in the 1960s TV series “The Green Hornet,” has died at age 82, according to media reports. The actor died of renal failure in Scottsdale, Ariz., on November 28. Before his career-defining role as the fedora-wearing playboy superhero, the handsome 6-footer starred as bachelor private eye Kenny Madison on “Bourbon Street Beat.” He then reprised the same role for “Surfside 6.” The actor would eventually hang it up as the 1970s gave way to the ’80s. Also Read: Andrew Sachs, 'Fawlty Towers' Star, Dies at 86 (Report) “The Green Hornet” was launched as a companion series to “Batman.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Green Hornet’ Star Van Williams Dies at 82

‘Green Hornet’ Star Van Williams Dies at 82
Van Williams, star of the 1966 TV show “The Green Hornet,” died last Monday in Scottsdale, Ariz., of renal failure. He was 82.

“He had a wonderful, caring, and kind heart,” his wife of 57 years, Vicki Williams, told Variety. “He was a wonderful husband, he was a fabulous father, and a devoted grandfather.”

Williams was a diving instructor in Hawaii when he was discovered in 1957 by producer Mike Todd, who was married to Elizabeth Taylor at the time. Williams was persuaded to come to Hollywood and try his hand at acting, and earned his big break on the ABC private detective show “Bourbon Street Beat.” He played Ken Madison, a character he later recycled for another detective show, “Surfside 6.”

In 1966, Williams signed a deal with 20th Century Fox to star in “The Green Hornet” as both the titular masked crusader and his newspaper editor alter ego, Britt Reid. He was ably supported by his martial arts master sidekick
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Van Williams, TV's Green Hornet, Dies at 82

Van Williams, who portrayed the masked crime-fighter The Green Hornet in a memorable but short-lived companion TV series to Batman in the 1960s, has died. He was 82.

The actor, who earlier played bachelor private eye Kenny Madison on two Warner Bros. Television detective series, Bourbon Street Beat and Surfside 6, died Nov. 29 of kidney failure at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., his wife of 57 years, Vicki, told The Hollywood Reporter. He had just one kidney since he was 25, she said.

In The Green Hornet, an adaptation of the radio serial that debuted in the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Paramount Looking to Reboot The Green Hornet

  • Cinelinx
Ah the Green Hornet, definitely an underused property. I mean yes we had a remake a few years ago that was okay but luckily there’s people out there that see potential in a reboot.

Okay so was I a fan of the original Green Hornet, nah. I mean the biggest thing for me was that it helped the career of Bruce Lee. And even as a comic reader the times the character has appeared have never been long lasting. What I can admire is that he still has a following of fans that know of the character and that alone shows there’s potential. Well the rights have apparently lapsed and have now been picked up by Paramount and Chernin Entertainment who are looking to make an edgier Green Hornet. Deadline is reporting that Gavin O’Connor (Warrior, The Accountant) looks to reinvigorate the almost 80 year old property.

“I
See full article at Cinelinx »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Birth of the Dragon’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Birth of the Dragon’
Was Bruce Lee actually a good fighter? The question sounds insane, because no one in the history of martial-arts cinema has ever been half as mesmerizing to watch. Plenty of martial-arts stars have speed, but Lee wasn’t just faster than any of then; he had the demonic charisma of speed, a ferocity that charged every jagged movement with expression. His limbs were jackknives on lightning, and his quivering, coal-eyed glower told you how committed he was to every cut and thrust. At the same time, right in the middle of a scene, a part of him hung back and observed it all. That’s why he was the rock star of kung fu, at once in the moment and soaring above it.

But, of course, every time we saw Bruce Lee fighting, he wasn’t really fighting; he was acting. How were his skills in genuine hand-to-hand bloodsport combat?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leslie H. Martinson, Prolific TV and ‘Batman’ Movie Director, Dies at 101

Leslie H. Martinson, Prolific TV and ‘Batman’ Movie Director, Dies at 101
Leslie H. Martinson, the prolific television director who is best known for helming the 1966 film “Batman: The Movie” has died. He was 101.

His family confirmed the death in a posting that said he died at home on Saturday, Sept. 3 of natural causes.

A native of Boston, Martinson started his career working for the Boston Evening Transcript before he started working as a script clerk at MGM in 1936.

Over the course of his long career, Martinson picked up over 100 directing credits, mostly for TV shows in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. He is responsible for episodes of “Maverick,” “The Brady Bunch,” “CHiPs,” “Diff’rent Strokes,” and many others.

While Martinson only directed two episodes of the wildly popular 1966 “Batman” TV show, (“The Penguin Goes Straight” and “Not Yet, He Ain’t”) he was asked to direct the movie that same year. He would also helm episodes of other superhero shows “The Green Hornet” and “Wonder Woman.”

Martinson
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Reviews: "Too Late For Tears" (1949) And "Woman On The Run" (1950); Blu-ray/DVD Dual Format Editions From Arrow Films

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

(The following reviews pertain to the UK Region 2 releases)

When I'm in the right mood I adore bit of film noir. I admire the diversity of its storytelling, I love every facet, from the hardboiled private eyes, duplicitous dames and characters that seldom turn out to be what they first appear, to the alleyways bathed in inky shadows, ramshackle apartments and half-lit street corners they inhabit. How can you not get drawn in by the sheer delight of Edward G Robinson playing a second rate psychic trying to convince the authorities he can see the future in The Night Has a Thousand Eyes? Or amnesiac John Hodiak on a mission to discover his own identity, in the process getting embroiled in a 3-year-old murder case and the search for a missing $2 million in Somewhere in the Night? Yes, indeed, there's nothing quite like a hearty serving of
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Unofficial Prequels: Films That May Have Been Prequels but You Didn’t Know It

  • Cinelinx
Do some films get made as secret sequels to unconnected earlier films, turning those older films into prequels? It may just be random coincidence, but some movies seems to work perfectly as continuations of earlier, unrelated films. The earlier films may not be official prequels, and they weren’t made by the same people—or even the same studio—but there are hints, if you look for them, which indicate that later filmmakers possibly looked at earlier projects and secretly wrote their newer films as informal sequels to those prior hits. Or maybe this is all just unplanned happenstance. Look at our list and see what you think.

Fight Club is a prequel to the Dark Knight: The theory is that the unnamed narrator (Edward Norton) of Fight Club goes on to become the Joker (Heath Ledger) in the Dark Knight. The evidence for this…The narrator of Fight Club
See full article at Cinelinx »

Six Stars Who Started Out Playing TV Super Heroes

  • Cinelinx
They may be best known today for their later roles, but these six stars all got their first break by playing super heroes on TV. Maybe these shows aren’t the most memorable or well-made super hero projects, and they aren’t the highlight of the actor’s career, but these little shows jump-started the careers of some future celebrities.

Bruce Lee

Started out as—Kato, the Kung-Fu fighting sidekick to the Green Hornet in the TV series The Green Hornet (1966).

After that—Lee had a recurring role in the detective series Longstreet before returning to Hong Kong to star in a highly successful trio of films; The Big Boss (1971); the Chinese Connection (1972) and the Way of the Dragon (1972). His first and only Hollywood film was Enter the Dragon (1973). Lee died young and his legend has grown ever since. He is considered by many as the greatest martial arts star in the history of film.
See full article at Cinelinx »

James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88
James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88
James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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