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The Train
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The Train (1964) More at IMDbPro »

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The Train -- In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo.

Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   9,357 votes »
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Up 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Franklin Coen (screen story) and
Frank Davis (screen story) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Train on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 March 1965 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
It carried their hopes, their nation's honour!
Plot:
In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Nail-Biting Frankenheimer Masterpiece See more (124 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Burt Lancaster ... Labiche

Paul Scofield ... Von Waldheim

Jeanne Moreau ... Christine
Suzanne Flon ... Mlle Villard

Michel Simon ... Papa Boule

Wolfgang Preiss ... Herren
Albert Rémy ... Didont (as Albert Remy)
Charles Millot ... Pesquet
Richard Münch ... Von Lubitz (as Richard Munch)
Jacques Marin ... Jacques
Paul Bonifas ... Spinet
Jean Bouchaud ... Schmidt
Donald O'Brien ... Schwartz (as Donal O'Brien)
Jean-Pierre Zola ... Octave
Arthur Brauss ... Pilzer (as Art Brauss)
Jean-Claude Bercq ... Major (as Jean-Claude Berco)
Howard Vernon ... Dietrich
Louis Falavigna ... Railroad Worker
Richard Bailey ... Grote
Christian Fuin ... Robert
Helmo Kindermann ... Ordnance Officer
Roger Lumont ... Engineer Officer

Gérard Buhr ... Corporal (as Gerard Buhr)
Christian Rémy ... Tauber (as Christian Remy)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Victor Beaumont ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Jacques Blot ... Hubert (uncredited)
Michel Charrel ... Bit Part (uncredited)

Nick Dimitri ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Max Fromm ... Gestapo Officer (uncredited)
Bernard La Jarrige ... Bernard - Doctor (uncredited)
Jean-Jacques Leconte ... Lieutenant of Retreating Convoy (uncredited)
Daniel Lecourtois ... Priest (uncredited)
Wolfgang Sauer ... Bit Part (uncredited)

Directed by
John Frankenheimer 
Arthur Penn (uncredited; fired, replaced by John Frankenheimer)
 
Writing credits
Franklin Coen (screen story) and
Frank Davis (screen story)

Franklin Coen (screenplay) and
Frank Davis (screenplay)

Rose Valland (book "Le front de l'art")

Walter Bernstein  uncredited
Howard Dimsdale  uncredited
Albert Husson  French version (uncredited)
Nedrick Young  uncredited

Produced by
Jules Bricken .... producer
Bernard Farrel .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Maurice Jarre 
 
Cinematography by
Jean Tournier (photographed by)
Walter Wottitz (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
David Bretherton 
Gabriel Rongier (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Willy Holt 
 
Makeup Department
Georges Bouban .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Serge LeBeau .... unit manager (as Serge Lebeau)
Robert Velin .... production manager
 
Art Department
Marc Frédérix .... assistant production designer (as Marc Frederix)
Roger Volper .... assistant production designer
 
Sound Department
Jacques Carrère .... sound re-recordist
Joseph de Bretagne .... sound (as Joseph De Bretagne)
Jacques Maumont .... sound re-recordist
 
Special Effects by
Lee Zavitz .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Jean Fouchet .... optical effects (as Jean Fouchet F.L)
 
Stunts
Steven Burnett .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
André Domage .... camera operator
Vincent Rossell .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Jean Zay .... wardrobe
 
Music Department
Maurice Jarre .... conductor
 
Other crew
Jules Bricken .... presenter
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"John Frankenheimer's The Train" - USA (complete title)
See more »
Runtime:
133 min | UK:140 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In this movie, it exists a short sequence that have disappeared since a long time now. This sequence shows Paul Scofield's character entering a little church and been fascinated by an icon painting.See more »
Goofs:
Plot holes: When the art train is rerouted in the wrong direction to return to Paris instead of going to Germany, the soldiers on the train should have noticed the deception when they saw the sun rising behind them instead of in front of them in the morning. They were supposed to be traveling East, but were in fact traveling West.See more »
Quotes:
Labiche:You crazy bastard.See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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41 out of 55 people found the following review useful.
Nail-Biting Frankenheimer Masterpiece, 28 June 2003
Author: SgtSlaughter from St. Davids, Pennsylvania, USA

Absolutely riveting thriller, an American-French co-production, with a great cast, well-written plot and script - and great stuntwork. As with all of John Frankenheimer's work, it's an instantly classic masterpiece.

Burt Lancaster is Labiche, a French station manager who becomes entangled in efforts to prevent German Colonel Von Waldheim (Scofield) from shipping hundreds of classic pieces of artwork out of Paris before the Allies re-take the city.

John Frankenheimer has done an excellent job putting every aspect of great storytelling together. The most essential part is the characters. Lancaster is absolutely great as Labiche. While the French want him to simply delay the train, Labiche is always more concerned about the human cost. Eventually, so many men are killed in the attempt to delay the train that he takes it upon himself to save the artwork so they did not die in vain. On the opposite side, Scofield makes a very believable, maniacal officer. He is purely obsessed by art. He's not your typical Hollywood "Nazi" officer; here, his one goal is not eradication of the Jews or whatnot - it's to steal millions of dollars worth of paintings for personal gain.

The French are played, for the most part, by young native French actors. Michel Simon plays a grizzled old engineer who tries to take matters into his own hands, at first, when Labiche won't aide the cause. Albert Remy (IS PARIS BURNING?) and Charles Millot (THE BATTLE OF NERETVA) are Labiche's resistance sidekicks, both passionate in their rather minor roles. Jeanne Moreau (THE VICTORS) makes a pretty big impression as a hotel owner who gets caught up the fight and elects to help Labiche, even though it will hurt her business and put her life in danger.

In support, the cast is made up of some very fine young actors who would become mainstream faces in later European war movies. Wolfgang Preiss (THE LONGEST DAY) makes an impression as the German Major commanding a rail yard, who is just simply trying to keep his facility running well and doesn't want to deal with Von Waldheim. The great Richard Munch (PATTON) has one strong scene as a German general, who knows the front line battle is more important than Von Waldheim's art. Howard Vernon (FROM HELL TO VICTORY) is the German captain with glasses in charge of the train; Donald O'Brien (DEADLY MISSION) is a very mean-looking Sergeant keeping Lancaster and Remy in check; and Arthur Brauss plays the German Captain interrogating the stationmaster.

The second essential portion of the story goes to the purely technical side of the production. First of all, there are some truly spectacular action sequences. Most of them were done with real locomotives, on life-size sets with authentic explosions. One huge, three-way head-on-collision is awe-striking and must have marvelous to see on the big screen. Lancaster performs all of his own stunts; jumping from control towers, running and catching moving trains - all, one would think, would be difficult for a man of 51 - but Lancaster doesn't show a bit of strain. A good deal of the action centers around simply moving trains and equipment through railyards, and it's all portrayed with acute attention to authenticity and detail.

At key moments, Frankenheimer uses his typical unorthodox filming technique to give the action a new perspective. The camera zooms in on every day objects, which actually have key importance at that one moment. He follows Labiche down a hallway with a handheld camera simply because it's the best way of showing how he gets to where he's going. All of this is trademark Frankenheimer direction, and it gives the film a sharp, cutting edge to its already awesome plot. Sincerely, standard direction with all of the same elements would really lessen the impact of the punch every other element packs.

A few side notes: the scenery is great; each town, village set piece, actual location or open countryside looks just like 1944 France. Maurice Jarre's rousing music score is great and is quickly becoming one of my favorite war movie themes, ranking with the works of Jerry Goldsmith, Ennio Morricone, Elmer Bernstein and John Williams.

I saw this movie on Turner Classic Movies, letterboxed about 1.66:1. This is apparently a transfer directly from the DVD. The print is excellent: the black and white image is sharp, the sound is clear and appropriately loud; and there is hardly a scratch or speckle to be seen. The DVD is probably worth buying for the commentary track it holds, but I have not yet viewed the disc.

THE TRAIN is an instant classic from the Golden Age of cinema, with every element working perfectly.

RATING: 10/10

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Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Albert Remy dubbed? Clanallan
Station Signs- Possible Spoiler danashley
Colonel Von Waldheim's last speech bobo-29
The Engine Repair Chris398
The circular journey the Train makes. eandtslattery
Unnecessary Destruction of France's railway heritage. de_niro_2001
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