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The Train (1964)

Unrated | | Thriller, War | 7 March 1965 (USA)
In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writers:

(screen story), (screen story) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Herren
Albert Rémy ...
Didont (as Albert Remy)
Charles Millot ...
Richard Münch ...
Von Lubitz (as Richard Munch)
Jacques Marin ...
Jacques
Paul Bonifas ...
Spinet
Jean Bouchaud ...
Schmidt
...
Schwartz (as Donal O'Brien)
...
Octave
Arthur Brauss ...
Pilzer (as Art Brauss)
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Storyline

As the Allied forces approach Paris in August 1944, German Colonel Von Waldheim is desperate to take all of France's greatest paintings to Germany. He manages to secure a train to transport the valuable art works even as the chaos of retreat descends upon them. The French resistance however wants to stop them from stealing their national treasures but have received orders from London that they are not to be destroyed. The station master, Labiche, is tasked with scheduling the train and making it all happen smoothly but he is also part of a dwindling group of resistance fighters tasked with preventing the theft. He and others stage an elaborate ruse to keep the train from ever leaving French territory. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

train | art | german | french | painting | See All (72) »

Taglines:

It carried their hopes, their nation's honour!

Genres:

Thriller | War

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

|

Release Date:

7 March 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

John Frankenheimer's The Train  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,700,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The budget doubled under John Frankenheimer, due to an emphasis on action and the filming of train wrecks, eventually reaching $6.7 million. United Artists felt compelled to step in and assert its completion rights, demanding that principal photography be finished in seven weeks. See more »

Goofs

When Labiche and his men are discovered painting white on the tops of the train cars carrying the stolen art, a German soldier runs at them firing his machine gun. The muzzle flashes, but there are no matching machine gun sounds; only a few single shots and some yelling and the siren are heard. See more »

Quotes

Labiche: You crazy bastard.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: PARIS August 2-1944 1511th day of German occupation See more »

Connections

Referenced in From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series: Opening Night (2015) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Peerless war movie
8 November 1999 | by (Washington DC) – See all my reviews

The movie is about the Nazis taking 'degenerate' modern paintings out of Paris as the allies are approaching. The officer in charge of the spoils, Colonel Von Waldheim, is secretly in love with the art he is supposed to hate; his official motivation is based on "cash value." The French train workers, led by Labiche, have no appreciation for the art and are unaware of its cultural importance, but nevertheless fight the Germans out of patriotism, against their better instincts.

Frantic, weary tension comes from the closeness of end of the war, a desperate time that drives the characters well past sane restraint. The Germans can no longer deny their impending doom. Grit comes from massive steam locomotives shot in black and white. The mortal struggle plays out on a personal level. The action is relentless.

The director, John Frankenheimer, relies on the intelligence and empathy of the audience to convey his story. Much of the movie is concerned with the mechanicals of how a railroad works. It shows the dignity and solidarity of the workers, and their huge effort.

The theme is the waste, the cost of war -- what is worth fighting for, what you actually do fight for even though it does not seem to be worth it, and the capricious outcome. The tally comes at the final scene.

"The Train" is a perfect action-adventure war drama.


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