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More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Everything, Everything You Need to Know About Nick Robinson

Image Source: Getty / Matthew Eisman If you've seen the trailer for the adaptation of Nicola Yoon's Everything, Everything, than you've no doubt found yourself googling its star Nick Robinson. While the 22-year-old actor's charisma and looks are comparable to fellow Ya star Ansel Elgort, there's another reason why he looks so familiar. In his short nine years of acting, he's actually been in a handful of well-known movies and shows. Since you'll probably be seeing his face everywhere after the film's release on May 19, we've gathered a few fun facts about him to jumpstart your newfound obsession. 1. He's From Washington Nick was born in Seattle on March 22, 1995. At age 11, he made his professional acting debut in a local production of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and eventually signed with The Savage Agency in La two years later. Unfortunately, the Writers Guild of America strike was in full swing at the time,
See full article at Popsugar »

Academy Award Film Series: Largely Forgotten Hoffman Movie Stolen by Oscar-Nominated Actress

'Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?' with Dustin Hoffman. Long-titled movie 'Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?': Messy filmmaking with one single bright spot To call Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? a curiosity is to perhaps infer quality buried in its quirk, or virtue obscured by its capriciousness. That's not the case, really, as this largely existential film is an absolute mess with only one bright spot of redemption (more on her later). Directed by Ulu Grosbard, Who Is Harry Kellerman… – with its long-winded, desperate title – is a curiosity along the lines of a relic, a work that somehow speaks of its time. Unfortunately, it really does not speak coherently, even if the film is unmistakably post-Woodstock, pre-Watergate, and all-American, with errant themes of success,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Comedian Jack Carter Dies at 93

Comedian Jack Carter Dies at 93
Comedian Jack Carter died June 28 of respiratory failure at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 93. He was also an actor, emcee, singer, mimic, dancer, and director in a career that spanned over seven decades.

He began his professional career appearing on Broadway in “Call Me Mister.” He later appeared on Milton Berle’s “Texaco Star Theatre” shows, and it was during this time that Carter got his first real break.

For two years, he hosted the early television variety program “Cavalcade of Stars” prior to having his own show on NBC, “The Jack Carter Show,” which lasted three years, and was a part of the “Saturday Night Review.” He also co-starred in several of the Colgate Comedy Hours with Ed Wynn, Jimmy Durante, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and Donald O’Connor.

In addition to “Call Me Mister,” his Broadway credits include “Mr. Wonderful” and “Top Banana.” He hosted the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Comedian Jack Carter Dies at 93

Comedian Jack Carter Dies at 93
Comedian Jack Carter died June 28 of respiratory failure at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 93. He was also an actor, emcee, singer, mimic, dancer, and director in a career that spanned over seven decades.

He began his professional career appearing on Broadway in “Call Me Mister.” He later appeared on Milton Berle’s “Texaco Star Theatre” shows, and it was during this time that Carter got his first real break.

For two years, he hosted the early television variety program “Cavalcade of Stars” prior to having his own show on NBC, “The Jack Carter Show,” which lasted three years, and was a part of the “Saturday Night Review.” He also co-starred in several of the Colgate Comedy Hours with Ed Wynn, Jimmy Durante, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis and Donald O’Connor.

In addition to “Call Me Mister,” his Broadway credits include “Mr. Wonderful” and “Top Banana.” He hosted the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Two and a Half Men’ Star Marin Hinkle Joins ‘Dinner With Friends’ Revival

  • The Wrap
‘Two and a Half Men’ Star Marin Hinkle Joins ‘Dinner With Friends’ Revival
Marin Hinkle, best known for playing Jon Cryer’s disapproving ex-wife on “Two and a Half Men,” will take her withering looks to the Off-Broadway stage in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s upcoming revival of “Dinner with Friends.” In addition to spending nine seasons on the CBS sitcom smash, Hinkle has extensive theater credits including Broadway productions of “Electra” and “A Thousand Clowns” and such Off-Broadway shows as “Graceland” and “Miss Julie.” “Dinner With Friends” won the Pulitzer when it premiered in 2000. It’s a wry and witty look at two couples who are close friends, but are forced to grapple with the.
See full article at The Wrap »

An Oscar Winner Has His Day Supporting a Brilliant Woodward and a Heavily Made-Up Hoffman

Martin Balsam: Oscar winner has ‘Summer Under the Stars’ Day on Turner Classic Movies Best Supporting Actor Academy Award winner Martin Balsam (A Thousand Clowns) is Turner Classic Movies’ unusual (and welcome) "Summer Under the Stars" featured player today, August 27, 2013. Right now, TCM is showing Sidney Lumet’s The Anderson Tapes (1971), a box-office flop starring Sean Connery in his (just about) post-James Bond, pre-movie legend days. (Photo: Martin Balsam ca. early ’60s.) Next, is Joseph Sargent’s thriller The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974). Written by Peter Stone (Father Goose, Arabesque) from John Godey’s novel, the film revolves around the hijacking of a subway car in New York City. Passengers are held for ransom while police lieutenant Walter Matthau tries to handle the situation. Now considered a classic (just about every pre-1999 movie is considered a "classic" these days), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three was
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Dildo That Never Was and Grant Quote: 'Expect the Biographical Worst'

Cary Grant and Randolph Scott marriages (See previous post: “Randolph Scott and Cary Grant: Gay Lovers?“) The English-born Cary Grant was married five times: Charles Chaplin’s City Lights leading lady Virginia Cherrill (1934-1935), Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton (1942-1945), Grant’s Every Girl Should Be Married and Room for One More co-star Betsy Drake (1949-1962), Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and Heaven Can Wait Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee Dyan Cannon (1965-1968), and Barbara Harris (1981-1986). Note: Cary Grant’s last wife was not the Barbara Harris of Nashville, Family Plot, and A Thousand Clowns fame. Cary Grant died at age 82 after suffering a stroke on November 29, 1986, while preparing for a performance of his one-man show, A Conversation with Cary Grant, in Davenport, Iowa. (Photo: Cary Grant and Randolph Scott ca. 1933.) The Virginia-born Randolph Scott was married twice: wealthy socialite Mariana duPont Somerville (1936-1939) and Patricia Stillman, from 1943 to his
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Willy Switkes, character actor, dies at 83

Willy Switkes, character actor, dies at 83
A character actor who had minor roles in Tootsie, Taxi Driver, and dozens of other films has died. Willy Switkes was 83.

His niece Ellen Switkes says he died of colon cancer on Thursday at a hospice in Rockville, Md.

Willy Switkes was a native of Washington, D.C., and a longtime New York City resident. He appeared in Broadway productions of The Cherry Orchard and A Thousand Clowns and was an understudy to Buster Keaton during a 1960 tour of Once Upon a Mattress. His other films include The French Connection and Bananas.

His characters often were unidentified, such as his
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Bonnie Franklin, 'One Day at a Time' star, dies at 69

Bonnie Franklin, 'One Day at a Time' star, dies at 69
Bonnie Franklin, the pert, redheaded actress whom millions came to identify with for her role as divorced mom Ann Romano on the long-running sitcom One Day at a Time, has died.

She died Friday at her home in Los Angeles due to complications from pancreatic cancer, family members said. She was 69. Her family had announced she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in September.

Franklin was a veteran stage and television performer before One Day At a Time made her a star.

Developed by Norman Lear and co-created by Whitney Blake – herself a former sitcom star and single mother raising future
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

The 10 Hottest "Best Supporting Actor" Performances

The 85th Academy Awards are at last upon us, and unfortunately we only have a few more days to think about the eternal hotness of some of the men they honor. As a companion piece to our Hottest Best Actor countdown, I present to you an important follow-up: The 10 Hottest Best Supporting Actor performances. Heath Ledger, Javier Bardem, and Christian Bale were too inhumanely grotesque to warrant inclusion, I'm sort of sorry to say. But who wasn't? Check 'em out below. 

10. George Clooney in Syriana

Get this: Syriana is the one movie on this list I haven't seen. Should I feel bad about that? George's win always struck me as compensation for the fact that he wasn't going to win the directing Oscar for Good Night and Good Luck (which he noted in his awful speech), but maybe it's a great performance. Also: I am not attracted to him in any way,
See full article at The Backlot »

Saul Bass' Lost Original Ending For 'Phase IV' Discovered In Los Angeles

Since its inception in 2007, Los Angeles' revival house Cinefamily has slowly become one of the city's most diverse and exciting places, hosting screenings of cult classics and current releases alike with special events galore. They've made a habit of digging up gems and developing a themed week around them (such as the stand-up comedy “A Thousand Clowns” with Jason Robards), but recently, during a week devoted to artist/designer Saul Bass' storied career, they managed to change film history.

According to Cinefamily's executive director, Hadrian Belove, archivists working at the Academy of Arts and Sciences stumbled upon an excised reel of Bass' 1974 directorial debut, “Phase IV” -- simply an item of speculation up to today -- while compiling footage for his retrospective. A science-fiction film about two scientists' relationship to an homicidal ant colony and its behavior, the project came in Bass' career after his iconic main title contributions
See full article at The Playlist »

More MGM Limited Edition Movies Released

  • Comicmix
Given the success of Warner’s Archive program, we’re thrilled to see other studios scouring their vaults for content aimed at the discerning cinephile. Here’s a release showcasing the latest coming from MGM via Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment:

Los Angeles (April 14, 2011) – Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment is bringing even more classics to DVD in April through its unique “manufacturing on demand” (“Mod”). The newest group of films will be part of the MGM Limited Edition Collection and available through online retailers. The vast catalog ranges from 1980’s Defiance to 1965’s four-time Academy Award® nominated A Thousand Clowns.

Enjoy your favorite movies from across the decades including:

1950′s

● Davey Crockett, Scout (1950): A U.S. military scout is assigned to stop Indian attacks on a defenseless group of wagon trains making their way West. Stars George Montgomery, Ellen Drew, Noah Beery Jr. Directed by Lew Landers.

Cloudburst
See full article at Comicmix »

From Jean Simmons to Tom Cruise – Non-Nominated Actors: Biggest Oscar Snubs #8f

Tom Cruise, Dustin Hoffman in Barry Levinson's Academy Award winner Rain Man (1988). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar that year; Cruise wasn't even nominated. Biggest Oscar Snubs #8e: Non-Nominated Actors – From Charles Farrell to Rock Hudson Jean Simmons, Elmer Gantry (1960) Robert Mitchum, The Sundowners (1960) Fredric March, Inherit the Wind (1960) Fred MacMurray, The Apartment (1960) Leslie Caron and Maurice Chevalier, Fanny (1961) Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer, West Side Story (1961) Laurence Harvey, Summer and Smoke (1961) Alec Guinness, Lawrence of Arabia (1962) Paul Newman, Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) Joan Crawford, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, Cleopatra (1963) Brandon DeWilde, Hud (1963) Susannah York, Tom Jones (1963) Alan Bates and Irene Papas, Zorba the Greek (1964) Dick Van Dyke, Mary Poppins (1964) Vivien Leigh, Ship of Fools (1965) Jason Robards and Barbara Harris, A Thousand Clowns (1965) Laurence Harvey and [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Selleck Set For Broadway

Selleck Set For Broadway
TV and movie star Tom Selleck has his sights set on Broadway - almost a decade after he made his theatre debut in New York.

The actor was a big hit in A Thousand Clowns in 2001 and he has been keen to get back onstage ever since - but his film and TV career and his sideline as an avocado farmer in California have kept him too busy.

He says, "I'll probably do a Broadway play soon. There's a lot of possibilities but it requires time which I'm happy to say I don't have right now.

"As much as I enjoyed doing my first Broadway play, my first play of any kind back in 2001, I haven't had a chance to go back."

At least Selleck is in the right city nowadays - he plays a New York City police chief in new TV series Blue Bloods, which will debut in America this autumn.

See also

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