Wile E. Coyote chases the Road Runner, and his ploys such as glue on the road, a huge magnifying glass, an exploding piano, a cannon disguised as a camera, and an anvil dropped from a ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

(story)

Star:

Reviews
Edit

Cast

Uncredited cast:
Paul Julian ...
Road Runner (voice) (uncredited)
Edit

Storyline

Wile E. Coyote chases the Road Runner, and his ploys such as glue on the road, a huge magnifying glass, an exploding piano, a cannon disguised as a camera, and an anvil dropped from a helicopter, all backfire on him, as usual. Written by Kevin McCorry <mmccorry@nb.sympatico.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

31 July 1965 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Exploding musical instrument scheme is in three Warner Brothers cartoons. The musical score is "Those Endearing Young Charms". In order, they are, first is 1951's Ballot Box Bunny (1951), as Yosemite Sam tried to get rid of Bugs Bunny, with an explosive piano. Second is 1957's Show Biz Bugs (1957), as Daffy Duck tried to get rid of Bugs Bunny, with an exploding xylophone. Then, in 1965, the rivals are Wile E. Coyote and "Anonymous" Roadrunner, (not named), in Rushing Roulette (1965). Wile E. Coyote set up an exploding piano, and the roadrunner played one 'sour note'. Additional fact: The very same musical note, approximately the seventh note to the tenth note, is the note, that is not played correctly, every time and when correctly played, by the schemer, gets the explosion happening to it. See more »

Connections

Followed by The Whizzard of Ow (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms
Music by Thomas Moore
(exploding piano tune)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Wrong, wrong, wrong
1 March 2003 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Once again, Robert McKimson shows he has no idea of what's going on as he takes Chuck Jones' Roadrunner-coyote series and wrecks it by having the Roadrunner do things to the coyote.

Although I am no fan of this particular series, which I feel Chuck Jones ran into the ground fairly early, a victim of its own success, there was a definite psychology and order to it. McKimson uses it to recycle gags, regardless of their relevance.


2 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Rushing Roulette (1965) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page