Repulsion
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003

1-20 of 39 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Barnes & Noble 50% Off Criterion Sale 2014! Top Titles to Buy!

10 November 2014 9:36 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

It's that time of year again and it's time to update the list for the second half of 2014 as Barnes & Noble has just kicked off their 50% off Criterion sale and as impossible a task as it is to cut things down to just a few titles, I have done my best to break Criterion's titles down into a few categories. Hopefully those looking for box sets, specific directors or what I think are absolute musts will find this makes things a little bit easier. Let's get to it... First Picks I was given the Zatoichi collection for Christmas last year and being a collection that holds 25 films and another disc full of supplementary material it is the absolute definition of a must buy when it comes to the Criterion Collection. It is, once again, on sale for $112.49, half off the Msrp of $224.99, and worth every penny. I spent the entire year going through it. »

- Brad Brevet

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'The Babadook' (2014) Movie Review

5 November 2014 11:03 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The appeal of Aussie writer/director Jennifer Kent's psychological horror The Babadook has little, if anything, to do with any chills it offers its viewers. Adapted from her 2005 short film (watch here), Kent explores love, loss, grief, motherhood and our ability to squash inner-demons, as well as our inability to ever let them go entirely in a fairy tale-esque thriller fans of Guillermo del Toro's Spanish-language features are sure to enjoy, though horror fans hoping for traditional cheap thrills may walk away disappointed. The story tells of Amelia (Essie Davis) and her six-year-old son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), six years after the sudden death of her husband. Amelia seems good natured enough when we first meet her, reading Samuel children's books to put him to sleep even though he rages throughout the day, screaming of a monster that haunts his dreams. This so-called monster is initially nameless until the »

- Brad Brevet

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‘Repulsion’, ‘Possession’ and the Language of Nightmares

1 November 2014 9:04 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Ingmar Bergman bowed down to his peer, Andrei Tarkovsky, for having given life to the language of cinema as dream: “Tarkovsky is for me the greatest, the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as reflection, life as a dream.” This praise from one master to another was more than warranted, for the two auteurs’ bodies of work are arguably the most distinguishable in the canon of film history for their use of moving imagery, intricate mise-en-scène, and meaning that arises not only once in the frame or from an actor’s mouth but that ripples throughout the remainder of the world of the movie. Hey now, this is what dreams are made of.

In the pond’s crystal clear reflection of our reality that is the cinema, there are also the murky patches. Both Bergman and Tarkovsky oftentimes forayed down »

- Oliver Skinner

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Top 100 Horror Movies: How Truly Horrific Are They?

31 October 2014 3:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Top 100 horror movies of all time: Chicago Film Critics' choices (photo: Sigourney Weaver and Alien creature show us that life is less horrific if you don't hold grudges) See previous post: A look at the Chicago Film Critics Association's Scariest Movies Ever Made. Below is the list of the Chicago Film Critics's Top 100 Horror Movies of All Time, including their directors and key cast members. Note: this list was first published in October 2006. (See also: Fay Wray, Lee Patrick, and Mary Philbin among the "Top Ten Scream Queens.") 1. Psycho (1960) Alfred Hitchcock; with Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam. 2. The Exorcist (1973) William Friedkin; with Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Jason Miller, Max von Sydow (and the voice of Mercedes McCambridge). 3. Halloween (1978) John Carpenter; with Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tony Moran. 4. Alien (1979) Ridley Scott; with Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. 5. Night of the Living Dead (1968) George A. Romero; with Marilyn Eastman, »

- Andre Soares

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8 Blood-Curdling Indies to Stream This Halloween

28 October 2014 12:22 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Halloween is upon us. Satisfy your taste for the weird, curious, disturbing and life-scarring with these eight independent horror films available to stream. "The Babadook" (2014) In this nerve-ratcheting haunted house tale by way of Roman Polanski's "Repulsion," Essie Davis gives a breakthrough performance as a woman struggling to cope with-- and even love -- her disturbed six-year-old son. What begins as a gloomy mother-son drama with etchings of "We Need to Talk About Kevin" goes horrifically bat-shit after he opens a creepy children's book portending doom and bloodshed for both of them. The film's classic haunted-house premise is scary, but the bone-chiller is its believable depiction of a broken woman slowly going insane. The film scooped up prizes at Fantastic Fest in September and hits DirecTV on demand Friday, October 31 before hitting theaters November 28. "A Field in England" (2013) Ben Wheatley's "A Field in »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Sale! Cronenberg, Del Toro, Polanski and More, Criterion Horror Titles On Sale This Week

27 October 2014 8:45 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

All this week Amazon has a sale on several of the Criterion Collection horror titles including David Cronenberg's Scanners and Videodrome, Guillermo del Toro's The Devil's Backbone and Cronos, Roman Polanski's Repulsion and Rosemary's Baby, Lars von Trier's Antichrist and Godzilla. I have included direct links to each sale title below as well as to my reviews where applicable. If I could make some recommendations, I would perhaps begin with Godzilla and Repulsion if you don't own either of those titles, Cronenberg fans really ought to own both Scanners and Videodrome and the DVD edition of Carl Th. Dreyer's Vampyr is rather kick ass. Give 'em all a look below and see what suits your tastes. Scanners Blu-ray - my review Scanners DVD The Devil's Backbone Blu-ray The Devil's Backbone DVD The Uninvited Blu-ray - my review Videodrome Blu-ray - my review Eyes Without a Face »

- Brad Brevet

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‘The Tenant’ is a psychological puzzle

27 October 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Tenant

Directed by Roman Polanski

France, 1976

Featuring Roman Polanski’s last major appearance in one of his own films, The Tenant completes the director’s look at paranoid city life, begun  with 1965’s Repulsion. Polanski plays Trelkovsky, a shy man who becomes convinced that his neighbors are scheming to drive him to suicide.

Like Rosemary’s Baby, Polanski begins outside of the apartment building, but the start of The Tenant is engineered to emphasize the labyrinthine structure of the edifice. Polanski and famed cinematographer Sven Nykvist start their lens on a closed window as Trelkovsky peers out, and then glide down the facade and crane from ledge to ledge, ending inside on Trelkovsky’s impossible entrance.

When indoors, The Tenant is expansive compared to the confinement of the director’s earlier films. Where Repulsion stayed almost entirely in Carol’s apartment, and Rosemary’s Baby saw only the laundry room, »

- Neal Dhand

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‘Rosemary’s Baby’ is a classic of unseen dread

20 October 2014 5:34 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Rosemary’s Baby

Directed by Roman Polanski

United States, 1968

Roman Polanski’s first foray into real, genre horror is a classic of mostly unseen dread.

Featuring a closely-coiffed Mia Farrow as the soft-spoken, childlike Rosemary Woodhouse, potential mother to the devil; John Cassavetes, post-Shadows, and just about to truly kick off his great directorial run; and the inimitable Ruth Gordan as a sort of Grace Zabriskie-precursor: the creepy neighbor next door, heavily made-up and eerily meddlesome, Rosemary’s Baby picks up the paranoid thread of 1965’s Repulsion. The film also anticipates the similarly – though more political – claustrophobic suspicion of Alan Pakula’s 1970’s films.

Like Repulsion Polanski puts a slender, nymph-like female at the center of the narrative, though Rosemary is endowed with more power than Catherine Deneuve’s Carol. Unlike his earlier film, Polanski externalizes the baleful forces and makes them realer. The strength of Rosemary’s »

- Neal Dhand

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‘Knife in the Water’ anticipates Roman Polanski’s creeping dread

13 October 2014 7:40 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Knife in the Water

Directed by Roman Polanski

Poland, 1962

Certainly a stretch to categorize as horror, Roman Polanski’s debut feature anticipates the creeping dread and tense blocking that will characterize his later, truer films of the genre.

Husband and wife Andrzej (Leon Niemczyk) and Krystyna (Jolanta Umecka) pick up a young hitchhiker (Zygmunt Malanowicz) on their way to a sailing outing. The young man joins them on the water and tensions rise among the three as the men jockey for power.

Coming after a number of murky, eerie shorts – including 1957’s grim A Murder – Knife in Water is Lifeboat meets Dead Calm but with Polanski’s signature brooding unease rather than overt, textbook suspense or violence. Repulsion, Rosemary’s Baby, and The Tenant make up the director’s “Apartment Trilogy,” and though Knife in Water is almost exclusively on open water it may as well mark the beginning of a “Claustrophobia Quadrilogy. »

- Neal Dhand

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Watch: Roman Polanski Talks Making 'Macbeth,' Shakespeare Adaptations & More In Criterion Collection Feature

9 October 2014 10:25 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Few directors have touched the level of quality achieved by Roman Polanski in the last half-century of cinema, In spite of his, shall we say, tainted reputation. The man whose life was marred by a childhood spent in Nazi-occupied Poland, the murder of his wife Sharon Tate and his notorious rape case and subsequent exile has also given us some of the most memorable films of all time, including “Knife in the Water,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” and “Chinatown" among others. One of Polanski’s most overlooked and visually ravishing pictures is his adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy “Macbeth.” The film —an uncharacteristically violent and grim period piece— was released in the aftermath of his wife’s gruesome murder and has since been lovingly restored by the great folks at Criterion, who have also commissioned stellar releases of many of Polanski’s cruel, darkly amusing early films (“Cul de Sac,” “Repulsion »

- Nicholas Laskin

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Fantastic Fest 2014: The Babadook – The Review

6 October 2014 1:04 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

On the surface, The Babadook is about a mysterious children’s book character that come to life to haunt a mother and her child. The dark creature almost has no distinguishable characteristics aside from a ghastly grin, long, sharp fingers and a top hat. It may sound like a straightforward idea but it is writer and director Jennifer Kent’s handling of the material that makes this film so memorable. The Babadook may be the scariest horror film of the year, but at the same time it is so much more. Beneath the slow-building dread lies a classic tale of a woman coming to terms with her own demons. Depression, regret, and life as a single mother are all examined in a thoughtful manner that elevates the film to a Polanski level of horror – especially in a way that recalls Catherine Deneuve in Repulsion or Mia Farrow in Rosemary’S Baby. »

- Michael Haffner

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New on Video: ‘Macbeth’

30 September 2014 3:23 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Macbeth

Written by Roman Polanski and Kenneth Tynan

Directed by Roman Polanski

UK, 1971

Following the success of Rosemary’s Baby in 1968, and prior to what is arguably still his greatest film, Chinatown (1974), Roman Polanski made three curious filmmaking choices. One was the international coproduction and rarely discussed What? (1972), one was the racing documentary Weekend of a Champion (1972), and the third, which actually came before these two, was Macbeth (1971). It is obviously not that a Shakespearean adaptation in itself is unusual, but rather that it so seemingly diverted from the films that were garnering the young Polanski his worldwide acclaim: taut thrillers like The Knife in the Water (1962), Repulsion (1965), Cul-De-Sac (1966), and Rosemary’s Baby. Yet in Macbeth, there are a number of characteristic Polanski touches — in story and style — harkening back to these previous works and in many ways pointing toward those to come.

Don’t be fooled by the Playboy »

- Jeremy Carr

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Ones Below begins shoot with Poesy, Morrissey

30 September 2014 3:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

David Farr’s psychological thriller starts shooting with Clemence Poesy, David Morrissey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Principal photography has started in London on David Farr’s directorial debut The Ones Below.

The psychological thriller is about two affluent couples living above and below each other, with both wives expecting babies. A tragic accident throws the couples into “a nightmare of psychological terror.”

The cast is led by Clemence Poesy, David Morrissey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Farr is the screenwriter of Hanna and a veteran of theatre including as artistic director of The Gate, Bristol Old Vic and Lyric Hammersmith and associate director of The Royal Shakespeare Company.

Nikki Parrott produces for Cuba Pictures in association with Tigerlily Films.  Executive producers are Dixie Linder with Nick Marston and Ben Hall of Cuba Pictures, Christine Langan and Joe Oppenheimer for BBC Films with Lizzie Francke as the lead executive for the BFI. The film is »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Ones Below begins shoot with Poesy, Morrisey

30 September 2014 3:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

David Farr’s psychological thriller starts shooting with Clemence Poesy, David Morrisey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Principal photography has started in London on David Farr’s directorial debut The Ones Below.

The psychological thriller is about two affluent couples living above and below each other, with both wives expecting babies. A tragic accident throws the couples into “a nightmare of psychological terror.”

The cast is led by Clemence Poesy, David Morrisey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Farr is the screenwriter of Hanna and a veteran of theatre including as artistic director of The Gate, Bristol Old Vic and Lyric Hammersmith and associate director of The Royal Shakespeare Company.

Nikki Parrott produces for Cuba Pictures in association with Tigerlily Films.  Executive producers are Dixie Linder with Nick Marston and Ben Hall of Cuba Pictures, Christine Langan and Joe Oppenheimer for BBC Films with Lizzie Francke as the lead executive for the BFI. The film is »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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The Ones Below kicks off with Poesy, Morrisey

30 September 2014 3:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

David Farr’s psychological thriller starts shooting with Clemence Poesy, David Morrisey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Principal photography has started in London on David Farr’s directorial debut The Ones Below.

The psychological thriller is about two affluent couples living above and below each other, with both wives expecting babies. A tragic accident throws the couples into “a nightmare of psychological terror.”

The cast is led by Clemence Poesy [pictured], David Morrisey, Stephen Campbell Moore and Laura Birn.

Farr is the screenwriter of Hanna and a veteran of theatre including as artistic director of The Gate, Bristol Old Vic and Lyric Hammersmith and associate director of The Royal Shakespeare Company.

Nikki Parrott produces for Cuba Pictures in association with Tigerlily Films.  Executive producers are Dixie Linder with Nick Marston and Ben Hall of Cuba Pictures, Christine Langan and Joe Oppenheimer for BBC Films with Lizzie Francke as the lead executive for the BFI. The film is »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Watch: Trailer for 'The Babadook,' One of 2014's Best Horrors

26 September 2014 11:49 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In this nerve-ratcheting haunted house tale by way of Roman Polanski's "Repulsion," Essie Davis gives a breakthrough performance as a woman struggling to cope with-- and even love -- her disturbed six-year-old son. What begins as a gloomy mother-son drama with etchings of "We Need to Talk About Kevin" goes horrifically bat-shit after he opens a creepy children's book portending doom and bloodshed for both of them. And that's all I'll say. Watch the official Us trailer below. This 2014 Sundance knockout most recently picked up a bevy of prizes at Fantastic Fest. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Catherine Deneuve for lifetime achievement, masterclass with Christopher Doyle at Mumbai Film Festival

17 September 2014 5:59 AM, PDT | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

Acclaimed French actor Catherine Deneuve, known for her iconic roles in films such as Repulsion (1965), Belle de Jour (1967) and Tristana (1970), and more recently in Dancer in the Dark (2000) and 8 Women (2002), will be conferred with the Lifetime Achievement award at the 16th Mumbai Film Festival. The festival will screen a selection of her movies as a tribute.

Side bar events of the festival include master classes by internationally acclaimed cinematographer Christopher Doyle, of Paranoid Park, Lady in the water, Psycho, In the Mood for love and Chunking Express; and noted director and writer Mahamat Saleh Haroun known for his films, Girgis, Bye Bye Africa, A Screaming Man.

Chaitanya Tamhane’s Venice “Lion of the future” winner Court is the only Indian film in international competition. The India Gold competition will showcase films like Avinash Arun’s Killa, Bikas Mishra’s Chauranga, Venu’s Munnariyippu, Dr. Biju’s Names Unknown and Vivek Wagh’s Siddhant. »

- NewsDesk

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Elisabeth Moss & Alex Ross Perry Are on the Same Page; Reteam for Polanski Influenced “Queen of Earth”

30 July 2014 8:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Making it a double casting mention type of day in the trades, after being added to Reed Morano’s Meadowland, Elisabeth Moss will also be reuniting with Alex Ross Perry on a project that harkens to the tune of mid-sixties Roman Polanski. While we await the mention of a female co-lead, Queen of Earth is being described as a psychological thriller a la Repulsion and Rosemary’s Baby and according to THR has Joe Swanberg on board to produce. Perry is currently on the fest circuit with Listen Up Philip — showings in Locarno and Next Fest are set for August.

Gist: This centers on two women who retreat to a beach house to get a break from the pressures of the outside world, only to realize how disconnected from each other they have become, allowing their suspicions to bleed into reality.

Worth Noting: Perry recently reteamed with helmer Bob Byington on 7 Chinese Brothers. »

- Eric Lavallee

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Locarno to honour Roman Polanski

28 July 2014 4:13 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Director Roman Polanski to hold a public masterclass at Swiss festival.

Oscar-winning director Roman Polanski, accompanied by his wife and actress Emmanuelle Seigner, is to be a guest of honour at the 67th Locarno Film Festival (Aug 6-16), where he will give a public talk about film.

As well as the masterclass with young filmmakers of the Locarno Summer Academy and public on Aug 15, Polanski will receive a special award from the festival.

He will also introduce a screening of Venus in Fur alongside actress Seigner on Aug 14 on the Piazza Grande.

The director, actor, producer and screenwriter is best known for features includes Repulsion (1965), Rosemary’s Baby (1968), Chinatown (1974) and The Pianist (2002), for which he won the Oscar for best director.

Locarno artistic director Carlo Chatrian said: “Roman Polanski’s films have been a regular feature of my trajectory as a filmgoer - making me laugh, shiver, think, and be emotionally moved.

“It has been »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 20-11

25 July 2014 6:41 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

In an odd turn of events, this list has a number of films that don’t have English-language titles. They just go by whatever the original title was. Good for us. What we do see in this portion of the list is a few movies that weren’t really created specifically to be horror films, but their themes and visuals made it so. In addition, we have some heavyweights of non-horror cinema creating horror films that push the genre all the more upward. “Thinking man horror,” if you will.

20. Le locataire (1976)

English Language Title: The Tenant

Directed by: Roman Polanski

Roman Polanski has made one of the greatest horror “trilogies” of all time with 1965′s British production Repulsion, 1968′s American production Rosemary’s Baby, and 1976′s French production The Tenant, completing his “Apartment Trilogy.” Unlike the other two, Polanski actually stars in The Tenant as Trelkovsky, a reserved man renting an apartment in Paris. »

- Joshua Gaul

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