IMDb > Repulsion (1965)
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Repulsion (1965) More at IMDbPro »

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Repulsion -- Roman Polanski's chilling psychological thriller stars Catherine Deneuve as a repressed beautician who spirals into homicidal madness.


User Rating:
7.8/10   32,919 votes »
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Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Roman Polanski (original screenplay) &
Gérard Brach (original screenplay) ...
View company contact information for Repulsion on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 October 1965 (USA) See more »
"A classic chiller of the 'Psycho' school!" See more »
A sex-repulsed woman who disapproves of her sister's boyfriend, sinks into depression and has horrific visions of rape and violence. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. Another 4 wins & 1 nomination See more »
(285 articles)
Daily | Ulmer, Herzog, Polanski
 (From Keyframe. 31 October 2015, 6:27 AM, PDT)

Hmwybs: Repulsion (1965)
 (From FilmExperience. 30 October 2015, 3:00 PM, PDT)

200 Greatest Horror Films (50-41)
 (From SoundOnSight. 28 October 2015, 6:00 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
One of the "best of" of psychological thrillers See more (193 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Roman Polanski 
Writing credits
Roman Polanski (original screenplay) &
Gérard Brach (original screenplay) (as Gerard Brach)

David Stone (adaptation & additional dialogue)

Produced by
Gene Gutowski .... producer
Robert Sterne .... associate producer
Sam Waynberg .... associate producer
Michael Klinger .... executive producer (uncredited)
Tony Tenser .... executive producer (uncredited)
Original Music by
Chico Hamilton (music composed by)
Cinematography by
Gilbert Taylor (director of photography)
Film Editing by
Alastair McIntyre 
Art Direction by
Seamus Flannery 
Makeup Department
Gladys Leakey .... hairdresser
Tom Smith .... make-up
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Ted Sturgis .... first assistant director
Art Department
Alf Pegley .... props
Frank Willson .... assistant art director
Sound Department
Stephen Dalby .... sound supervisor
Les Hammond .... sound mixer (as Leslie Hammond)
Gerry Humphreys .... sound recordist
Tom Priestley .... sound editor
Lionel Strutt .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Alan Hall .... camera operator
Stanley A. Long .... camera operator (uncredited)
Laurie Turner .... stills (uncredited)
Editorial Department
Karen Heward .... assistant editor
Music Department
Chico Hamilton .... music conducted by
Gábor Szabó .... orchestrator (as Gabor Szabo)
Chico Hamilton .... musician: drums (uncredited)
John Scott .... musician: tenor sax/flute (uncredited)
Other crew
Terry Glinwood .... production controller
Michael Klinger .... presenter
Tony Tenser .... presenter
Dee Vaughan .... continuity
Maurice Binder .... title designer (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
105 min
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Australia:M | Finland:K-16 (1993) (uncut) | Finland:K-18 (1965) (cut) | Finland:(Banned) (1965) (uncut) | France:-16 | Germany:16 (re-rating) | Hungary:16 | Iceland:16 | Italy:T (DVD rating) | Italy:VM18 (VHS rating) | Netherlands:18 (1966) | Norway:16 (original rating) | Norway:18 (video rating) | Portugal:M/16 | Singapore:PG | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:18 (DVD) | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (tv rating) | UK:15 (theatrical re-release) (2004) | UK:18 (video rating) (1985) (1990) (2003) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:18

Did You Know?

Premiere voted this movie as one of "The 25 Most Dangerous Movies".See more »
Continuity: When Carol gets back home from work she takes off her shoes. A moment later, in the bathroom, she has them on her feet again.See more »
Hélène Ledoux:Why did you throw Michael's things away?
Carole Ledoux:I don't like them there.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Something to Scream About (2003) (V)See more »


How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
What caused Carole to become so repulsed by men's sexual advances that she sinks into madness?
Any recommendations for other films that feature women going insane?
See more »
53 out of 67 people found the following review useful.
One of the "best of" of psychological thrillers, 18 September 2006
Author: tonyt86 from Greece

Extremely shocking if you consider the time it was filmed!

Carole, a beautiful, young, unusually shy, fragile, foreigner, works in a beauty salon and lives with her older sister Helene in London. Her behavior at first seems "faintly strange" and distant, but it appears like this is normal for everyone around her. Soon we realize she is antisocial and has a psycho-pathological fear of males and sex. When Helene leaves for a trip with her lover, Carole isolates herself in her sister's apartment and surrenders to her morbid fantasies that lead her down a path of hallucinations all the way to murder.

Polanski uses "the world outside" in a clever way, to give us the whole parameter that helps bring about Carole's downfall. The social alienation a foreigner feels, the domination games and the self-interest of the people close to her. The men that approach her together with her own sexual fears, are all catalysts. They create the image of a threatening world and her helpless existence in it, as seen from inside her already troubled mind. Then begins a very true, detailed description of her problematic mind that slowly worsens into madness. Done in a natural and simple way and perhaps that is what makes it so haunting.

The first part is purposely slow. A moment-to-moment reality that builds up tension and soon gives way to a nightmarish world. We watch as everyday reality transforms into a closed-door hell and as Carole transforms from "strange" into a clinical psychopath. The house becomes a character, its dimensions distorted and Carole is left there, to wander in it alone, with the house and the objects acting as symbols to portray exactly what is going on inside her head. (Everything symbolizes Carole's mental decline in parallel). Space becomes distorted. Time becomes distorted. She becomes distorted.

The black and white makes you focus exactly where the director wanted and the visual effects are very limited compared to todays psychological thrillers. Here, the girl and the apartment are enough. The violence is not graphic it is psychological. Polanski's expert use of sound, sets, camera angles and framing all play a great role in creating the horror atmosphere.

Deneuve is Fantastic! In a very difficult part (if you consider she plays alone and without dialogue most of the time) delivering an extremely complex role (her best performance to date) perfectly!! People have rushed to say she was "flat" but in this specific film, I believe that was the intention. The MIND is the protagonist here; she is only the vehicle where the mind lives. Her "underplaying" helps the viewer focus on what is happening inside her head, makes you follow her and go through the experience with her. If one decides to watch this film and not experience it, then yes, she looks hypnotized.

By the time Helene and her boyfriend return, the viewer is just as shocked to have seen what the couple finds there. It is heartbreaking. The very last scene then finishes you off, perhaps giving the biggest clue. Revealing a secret as to why this has happened. And the way this scene is filmed leaves you with a chill in the spine. I became even more disturbed well after the movie was over and my thoughts had settled down. This is why I call this film an "experience".

I think that some factors always needed when putting a "value" on films are often overlooked. Things like: Time of release, Level of difficulty in achievement of the story itself and Level of difficulty because of the budget or the country of production. Based on these, I think that Polanski has created masterwork. It could be considered very slow, especially for today's viewers. And for others it could even be considered a claustrophobic hell. In respecting everyone's personal opinions I would only recommend this to a specific audience and specific friends. Mostly ones who want to concentrate and allow themselves to be taken in by this type of film. For them, I am sure the experience will be rewarding.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Repulsion (1965)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Anybody feared there might be a eel appearing from the sink or bath ? shipagan
It's about sexual ABUSE, not REPRESSION charlessamuellang
The Photograph Thesan
Did Michael Rape Her At The End? kblade64
Photo at the end, line of sight, rape theory lombano
Carol was raped as a child bigern5007
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