Edit
The Loved One (1965) Poster

(1965)

Trivia

Ruth Gordon and Jayne Mansfield were both cut from the released print of the film.
Director of Photography Haskell Wexler was dissatisfied with some of the outdoor Whispering Glades scenes because they were being filmed at high noon and the trees were not casting significant shadows, which he felt was necessary to give the shot proper depth. To compensate, he had the crew paint tree "shadows" on the ground. This is plainly visible in some scenes, as the trees' "shadows" are entirely dissimilar from those of the actors standing next to them.
This is Liberace's only film in which he does not play the piano on screen.
Evelyn Waugh disowned this film of his famous novella and tried unsuccessfully to get his name taken off the credits. Three days after the film's London opening, he died unexpectedly at his home in Somerset. It is thought that he had not seen it.
At the advance screening for studio execs, many were so offended that they walked out before the film ended. This pleased Tony Richardson to no end, as this was precisely the effect he was hoping to have on "old Hollywood" types.
After WWII, Evelyn Waugh came to Hollywood to work on a movie adaptation of his novel "Brideshead Revisited". While in Hollywood he went to a funeral at Forest Lawn Memorial Park. Waugh was offended by the pretense of both the American film industry and the American funeral industry, and wove the two together into the novel on which this film was based.
During the studio canteen scene between Robert Morse and John Gielgud, an extra can be seen in the background wearing the monster mask from The Outer Limits (1963) episode "The Sixth Finger".
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
American actor Robert Morse had such trouble keeping up his British accent that eventually all of his dialogue had to be recorded in a studio and dubbed over the film.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Final film of Liberace.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sir Francis Hinsley drives a Talbot drophead coupé.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Paul Williams, 25 at the time this film was made, was concerned that his natural voice was too deep to play a preteen, and tried make his voice as high-pitched as he reasonably could.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Dennis first arrives in the US, the immigration officer points out his "Beatles" haircut, to which Dennis responds that it's a normal British haircut. In fact, Robert Morse recalled being uncomfortable with having to grow his hair out for the part, as The Beatles were the only male celebrities well-known in the US whose hair was so long in the back.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to Robert Morse, director Tony Richardson held John Gielgud in great esteem, and before Gielgud arrived to film his scenes, took Morse aside and asked him to be particularly nice to him.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sir Francis Hinsley, played by John Gielgud, tells his nephew, "Ah, that's Sir Ambrose Abercrombie, one of our most ardent thespians . . . he usually plays prime ministers or butlers". Gielgud himself played prime ministers on the screen three times: Disraeli twice, in The Prime Minister (1941) and later in Edward the King (1975), as well as Salisbury in Murder by Decree (1979), and was perhaps best known to the general public for his role as Hobson the butler in Arthur (1981) and its sequel Arthur 2: On the Rocks (1988).
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Anjanette Comer recalled that many well-known actresses wanted the part of Aimee, but Tony Richardson picked her precisely because he wanted an "unknown" for the part.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
'Phil Silvers (I)' was originally announced to play the Milton Berle role.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The news anchor at the end of the film was played by the beloved long-time Laker announcer Chick Hearn.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Kim Stanley was originally announced to play role of the astronaut's stripper widow, a part that ultimately went to Barbara Nichols.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In his posthumous memoirs, Tony Richardson claimed to be a great admirer of Evelyn Waugh's, and that he had been upset by Waugh's antipathy towards this film, which he said was caused by a misunderstanding over which he had had no control. However, before filming began, Richardson was widely quoted as having called Waugh's novel "thin and dated", and some antipathy to it is surely indicated by his hiring Christopher Isherwood to work on the screenplay. Isherwood and Waugh had been literary rivals during the 1930s, and Isherwood was unlikely to have forgotten Waugh's savage criticisms of him, particularly after he and W.H. Auden left for America at the start of World War II. (Auden and Isherwood were transparently the models for the derided characters of "Parsnip" and "Pimpernel" in Waugh's wartime novel, "Put Out More Flags").
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Screenwriter Terry Southern gave the name "Maxwell Kenton" to the Milton Berle character in the film, who does not appear in the original Evelyn Waugh novel. "Maxwell Kenton" was a pseudonym Southern had used in real life when his controversial and outrageous satirical novel "Candy" (co-written with Mason Hoffenberg) was first published in Paris in the 1950s - the book, which was long-banned elsewhere, was at that time published by the Olympia Press, a publishing house specializing in pornography.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The idea for a bizarre TV quiz game to be called "What's My Disease?" is borrowed by screenwriter Terry Southern from his own 1958 novel, "Flash And Filigree".
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Although Tony Richardson preferred to make his films entirely on location, this one used MGM's Culver City studio extensively - but as a location. No sound-stage was employed as a sound-stage, but several parts of the studio, notably the entrance and the commissary, were used to replicate parts of the fictitious "Megalopolitan Studios". The film went steeply over schedule and a million dollars over budget. It was a major box-office failure.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The pet cemetery vehicle Dennis drives is a 1948 Citroën Type A van.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Aimee is driving to get away from Dennis, she drives past Diamond Jim's restaurant at 6753 Hollywood Blvd. The location is now a Frederick's of Hollywood (2016).
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The car Aimiee drives is a 1956 Nash Metropolitan Series III 2-door convertible. It was made in the UK for export to the USA. MSRP was $1,551 ($13,580 in 2016). For some reason, it is missing its distinctive hood ornament and its wheel fender skirts, most noticeably on the right rear.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Tony Richardson had considered Elizabeth Taylor for Aimee, with Richard Burton co-starring.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page