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Kaijû daisensô
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Reviews & Ratings for
Invasion of Astro-Monster More at IMDbPro »Kaijû daisensô (original title)

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15 out of 15 people found the following review useful:

Underrated Godzilla film

8/10
Author: (stevenfallonnyc@yahoo.com) from NYC
4 May 2004

I always thought "Monster Zero" (along with the one after, "Godzilla vs. The Sea Monster") was a bit underrated in the Godzilla film list. King Ghidrah makes his second appearance, and it is a lot more fun and interesting than his first ("Ghidrah The Three Headed Monster" from 1964).

This definitely isn't the fastest moving Godzilla film, but there are a lot of cool things to look at as the plot goes along slow at times. And the alien invasion/takeover plot is pretty decent if not overly original. The aliens look pretty cool and their hardware is 60's sci-fi retro, you gotta love it.

Nick Adams is pretty decent enough and gives the film a certain flair. It's a shame he had to leave us so soon, as it would have been a blast to have him return in a future Godzilla film.

The special effects are totally mid-60's Godzilla, with all the obvious miniatures being stomped on by the guys in the monster suits. There's one great shot where a doll of an astronaut gets lowered onto Planet X via an open elevator outside the spaceship, and as the doll is lowered to the ground in one lengthy camera shot, you can't help but laugh a little realizing that there was no attempt whatsoever to make that shot look real, or to hide the fact it's so fake with quick silly editing. But that's part of the charm of the early Godzilla films.

I always thought it was odd when, on Planet X underground, as the leader shows the astronauts the screen showing Ghidrah wildly attacking on the surface, that Ghidrah is in essence attacking nothing but rocks and dirt because that's all there is on the planet's surface. And also how Ghidrah flies past that huge painting of a planet in the distance a few times.

Godzilla and Rodan eventually save the Earth and that's what it's all about in a 1965 Godzilla film. Godzilla by this time was definitely all hero protecting his home planet. It's such a shame that unless a movie looks like a silly music video, so many kids won't watch it. Hopefully a lot of parents are introducing their kids to these old Godzilla films via DVD and video, because they sure aren't on TV much anymore.

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12 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

Godzilla vs. Monster Zero (1965) ***

7/10
Author: JoeKarlosi from U.S.A.
18 February 2005

This was one of the first Godzilla films I can recall watching on prime-time network television when I was growing up (back then it went under its Americanized title of simply, MONSTER ZERO). Though pretty far-fetched, it's still a highly enjoyable offering in the Toho series and gives us another chance to see Godzilla and Rodan join forces against the popular three-headed King Ghidorah (Monster Zero).

This time the widescreen English dubbed version is an asset, as American actor Nick Adams adds some spice to this one, since it's always fun to hear his nasal Brooklynese voice delivering such entertaining macho lines of gibberish as: "you stinkin' rats! What have you done to her?" Adams plays one of two astronauts sent to the newly discovered "Planet X" where he meets an alien civilization forced to live underground in order to avoid frequent attacks by Ghidorah up on the surface. The leaders ask our heroes to help them obtain the services of Earth monsters Godzilla and Rodan to help them vanquish 'Monster Zero'. But all may not be quite as it seems...

Some fans don't like the fact that the monster battles are kept to a minimum this time, but they're pretty good when they arrive and it's an added kick seeing the desolate looking Planet X in outer space, with its mountains, craters and dark, star-lit skies. The addition of aliens, flying saucers and double-crosses help make this a good time for Godzilla lovers. *** out of ****

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10 out of 11 people found the following review useful:

A Blast From My Childhood

Author: Brian Washington (Sargebri@att.net) from Los Angeles, California
16 December 2002

This film was the first Godzilla film that I really remember seeing from beginning to end. I was so taken by it that I forgot to go to the bathroom (I was only five at the time). This film helped to cultivate my love for the kaiju eiga genre. Even though many people have put this film down as being one of the weakest in the Godzilla series, it will always hold a special place in my heart.

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9 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

An undervalued gem.

9/10
Author: G.Spider
15 June 1999

A lot of 'professional' film critics seem to have an irrational dislike of Godzilla films. True, the special effects in them aren't usually fantastic but they're certainly a lot better than many 60's western dinosaur films which just rely on lizards with fins and spikes blu-tacked to them.

This film, for example, is an excellent piece of sci-fi, imaginative, well-paced and containing genuine characters and interesting monsters. An alien race want to borrow Godzilla and Rodan to stop Ghidorah attacking their home planet, but it soon turns out they are not as friendly as they seem.

One of the best Godzilla films I've seen, a true classic from the golden age of monster movies.

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8 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

Banzai, Nick Adams!

7/10
Author: murasakiotto from Japan
7 August 2006

The other day I found this movie at a nearby video shop by chance. Contrary to my anticipation, I found this movie quite fun. The movie I saw was in Japanese and Nick Adams' voice was dubbed, but his acting was pretty good, though he pulled up his pants a lot.

This brought me good memories of Mr. Adams. As a kid about ten years old at that time, my father (who was the USA representative for Toho and manager of the Toho La Brea Theatre) and I went to the LA airport to see him off. He was going to Japan to take this movie. He was very friendly and relaxed, he was with his wife and his little boy, he looked very happy and energetic. I remember asking him, Mr. Adams, how are fight scenes taken in movies? He replied with a nice big smile and with a fighting gesture, we really fight and punch! Gasshou! meaning I join my palms together for Mr. Adams and for my late father.

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10 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

Not enough monster footage,but still a good Godzilla film

Author: DrLenera from UK
11 March 2004

Monster Zero,to give this film it's most common name,is another quality Godzilla film coming on the heels of the classic Godzilla Vs Mothra and Ghidorah the 3 Headed Monster. The film is a slight notch down from those two,but still a hugely entertaining movie-inventive,exciting and quite spectacular considering it's comparatively low budget.

The film combines the monster battle plots of the previous films with an alien invasion story a la Battle In Outer Space. The idea of aliens controlling monsters to attack Earth would later be done to death in later series entries. The plot here is quite clever and interesting,although the film is a little slow and only really gets going in the final third,which has one of the best destruction scenes of the series {although spot the tiny bit of footage from the films Rodan and Mothra}. Not enough of the monsters is seen in this film,and the two battles are too brief,despite the priceless sight of Godzilla's victory shuffle.

Nevertheless,there is much to enjoy,including Nick Adam's VERY enthusiastic performance and some of his silly but cool dialogue,some very impressive special effects and visuals {one day people will stop saying the effects in these films are poor},and a rather daring alien/human romance that even includes sex, {although you'll have to listen for the reference}. The US version only had minor cuts and music cue alterations,nothing to ruin the film.

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7 out of 8 people found the following review useful:

Godzilla Vs. Ghidorah Again!

Author: BaronBl00d (baronbl00d@aol.com) from NC
21 October 2001

Some astronauts(two to be specific...one of which is Nick Adams) leave planet Earth and fly to planet X. Once there, they discover life underground that supposedly lives in fear of King Ghidorah. They ask Earth to send Rodan and Godzilla to their planet to fight Ghidorah. Earth agrees, and the aliens send a tape back with the astronauts after their second voyage that tells Earthlings to submit to the alien will, or King Ghidorah, really their own private monster, will destroy them. This is an interesting film in the Godzilla series that has some pretty good sci-fi elements blended with good ole Godzilla fun. The monsters are what you would expect and the acting is pretty pedestrian as a rule. Adams is an unwelcome addition as his acting ability is somewhat suspect, and he tends to stick out like a sore thumb. Nevertheless, the film zips along at a nice pace. My only major criticism is that the monsters, and in particular Godzilla, have too few scenes. Inshiro Hondo directed this one, and it has many of his distinctive touches.

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5 out of 5 people found the following review useful:

We need from you Monster Zero 1 and Monster Zero 2, Godzilla and Rodan.

8/10
Author: Spikeopath from United Kingdom
24 May 2015

It's one of those Godzilla movies where you fully understand why some fans of the "Zilla" series positively dislike it. The big atomic lizard is only a bit part player here, and when push comes to shove the monster mayhem is in short supply, which considering we also have Ghidorah and Rodan in the mix is for sure a bit of a waste. Yet this is one of the better sequels from Toho's original wave, it quite literally has all the ingredients that made "Zilla" and the off-shoots so iconic.

We are in live action cartoon territory, a sci-fi story of bonkers proportions yet engrossing all the same. The joyous model work synonymous with the series remains intact, the cardboard sets being obliterated are still fun to watch, and the divisive sight of "Zilla" doing the "shay" dance is in here whether you like it or not. More fun, though, is watching "Zilla" boxing the three headed Ghidorah, now that is comedy gold, if only the moody lizard had gone southpaw a bit earlier then saving the world could have been achieved quicker.

Great fun, could have been better from a monster point of view? Yes, definitely, but this be a nutty fruitcake production from Toho and amen to that. 8/10

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6 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

The best of the Showa era sequels

9/10
Author: TrevorAclea from London, England
5 August 2007

After the somewhat disappointing Ghidorah The Three-Headed Monster, things definitely improved for Godzilla, Ghidorah and Rodan in their next rampage. Despite its curiously low IMDb rating and the fact that the big feller isn't at the centre of the plot, Invasion of Astro-Monster aka Kaijû Daisenso/War of the Monsters aka Godzilla Vs. MonsterZero may be the best classic Godzilla follow-up of them all. Unlike many of the films it doesn't limit the monster action to the last two reels, spacing it out more evenly and integrating it more effectively into the human story, while the final orgy of destruction is epic stuff rather than just another battle in an isolated mountain area even if it is bulked out with a bit of stock footage from Rodan and Mothra. It's also surprisingly well-plotted, with sunglass wearing polyester-clad aliens offering a cure for cancer in exchange for the loan of Godzilla and Rodan to rid their barren planet of Ghidorah – or so they say. Instead they plan to use all three monsters to turn Earth into a colony planet and its up to astronauts Nick Adams and Akira Takarada and Akira Kubo's impoverished inventor to stop them.

The result may be no 2001, but it is a lot of fun. The film has a fabulous 60s comic book look to it and the special effects are fun: in no way photo-realistic, but undeniably appealing. The Rodan effects are much improved this time round, as is the fight choreography with the comedy largely limited to the fan-enraging sight of Godzilla doing a victory shay dance (best compared to a sailor's hornpipe as performed by British comedians Morecambe and Wise!). Not released in the US until 1970 because of Nick Adams' suicide shortly after finishing the film, the US version included on Classic Media's Region 1 DVD is only very slightly trimmed from the Japanese version, although sadly the DVD does not include the blooper of Godzilla's model foot bouncing away included on the Japanese DVD!

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6 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

You can dance if you want to....

Author: markaupe from left my heart in S.F.
8 November 2004

This film is close to the last of the quality Godzilla films where a budget is evident, and the future of the series became apparent. This film is a sequel to GHIDDORAH: THE THREE HEADED MONSTER and story elements went into the classic, DESTROY ALL MONSTERS. Goji completely went into his Earth defender mode in this story of alien domination against our planet.

This film is a great representation of the series and and Japan's desire and attitude for the times, coupled with our realization that everything is completely impossible. The best way to watch any Godzilla film is to believe that you are watching an alternate universe where all nations are equally powerful and those future dreams of the past did become possible.

For Godzilla fans, there is a lot of love about this film. There are interesting characters and many consider this Nick Adams' best film; which may not be true, but his co-star is BIGGER. For me, it is the images of the two monsters being lifted from the lake and hauled off to Planet X. The battle on the planet is now considered a classic moment too, as Goji does a victory dance(referred to as The Godzilla Shie). Godzilla always seemed to have a personality, but that dance cemented this notion, as he also demonstrates emotions in this story.

The fact that you are reading this review, demonstrates that you may have your own ideas and feelings about this film. This review is for the cinefile who believes in Godzilla and many of the other movies that came from Toho Studios. My recommendation is that you watch DESTROY ALL MONSTERS after this film, and then go play the two Godzilla video games that are now available.

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