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John Goldfarb, Please Come Home! (1965) Poster

Trivia

Notre Dame University got a court injunction to delay the release of the film, claiming the studio had "knowingly and illegally misappropriated, diluted and commercially exploited for their private profit the names, symbols, football team, prestige, high reputation and goodwill" of the university. After three months of court battles, the studio won out.
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This was Shirley MacLaine's second consecutive film to wind up with her cavorting under an oil gusher; she did the same thing in the climax to her previous movie, 1964's What A Way To Go!
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Four versions of the title song (sung under the credits) were recorded. One was by Jaye P. Morgan, the other three by Shirley MacLaine. The Morgan version was heard by the film's critics at the original press screenings. One of the MacLaine versions was used in the film when it was released, and ever afterward. The two unused MacLaine versions had different lyrics. One was more "romantic," the other was sung to Goldfarb by his "Jewish mother." All four versions are included on the CD soundtrack.
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In 2007, a musical comedy version of "John Goldfarb, Please Come Home" was performed in New York City as part of the annual Fringe Festival. William Peter Blatty's script followed his original screenplay fairly closely, although none of the original music was used.
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Harry Morgan, as Secretary of State Deems Sarajevo, stops an argument between his underlings by yelling "Silence in Court! Let the Monkey speak!" This might be a reference to Morgan's role, a couple of years earlier, as the Judge in "Inherit the Wind," about the Scopes "monkey trial."
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According to Patricia Bosworth's 1978 biography, Montgomery Clift was offered the male lead in the film, but turned it down.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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