IMDb > The Hill (1965)
The Hill
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The Hill (1965) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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7.9/10   8,147 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Ray Rigby (screenplay)
Ray Rigby (play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Hill on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
11 June 1965 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
They went up like men! They came down like animals!
Plot:
In a North African military prison during World War II, five new prisoners struggle to survive in the face of brutal punishment and sadistic guards. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won BAFTA Film Award. Another 3 wins & 6 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Gritty prison drama, superbly acted by all. See more (79 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Sean Connery ... Joe Roberts

Harry Andrews ... R.S.M. Wilson

Ian Bannen ... Harris
Alfred Lynch ... George Stevens

Ossie Davis ... Jacko King

Roy Kinnear ... Monty Bartlett
Jack Watson ... Jock McGrath

Ian Hendry ... Staff Sergeant Williams

Michael Redgrave ... The Medical Officer (as Sir Michael Redgrave)
Norman Bird ... Commandant
Neil McCarthy ... Burton
Howard Goorney ... Walters
Tony Caunter ... Martin
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
James Payne ... Man in Prison (uncredited)

Directed by
Sidney Lumet 
 
Writing credits
Ray Rigby (screenplay)

Ray Rigby (play) and
R.S. Allen (play)

Produced by
Raymond Anzarut .... associate producer
Kenneth Hyman .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Oswald Morris (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Thelma Connell 
 
Art Direction by
Herbert Smith 
 
Makeup Department
George Partleton .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Clifton Brandon .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Frank Ernst .... assistant director
Pedro Vidal .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
David Bowen .... sound recordist
Peter Musgrave .... sound editor
Fred Turtle .... dubbing mixer
A.W. Watkins .... recording supervisor
Peter Davies .... post-synchronisation (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Gerry Crampton .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Nosher Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Brian West .... camera operator
Dennis Fraser .... grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Elsa Fennell .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Other crew
George Montford .... technical advisor
Lee Turner .... continuity
Geoff Freeman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
123 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:12 (video rating) (1998) | USA:TV-14 (TV rating) | USA:Approved (certificate #20843)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The two prisoners being released at the beginning of the movie are members of the Royal Tank Regiment which is shown by their cap-badges.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: The new prisoners are initially lined up in the middle of the camp with their kit at their feet. As the prisoners are in turn called to see the army doctor a raised wooden walkway appears in front of them and later disappears.See more »
Quotes:
Trooper Joe Roberts:So what's the charge? Failing to obey an order? Or, drunk in charge of a cigarette lighter? Oh, you crazy bastard! You'd prop up dead men and inspect them if you was ordered to!
Regimental Sergeant Major Bert Wilson:Right! You're RIGHT!
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
54 out of 59 people found the following review useful.
Gritty prison drama, superbly acted by all., 9 January 1999
Author: Christopher Tully from Falls Church, Virginia

"The Hill" is the first of five films Sean Connery made with Sidney Lumet, and is one of the best, largely because it focuses on ensemble acting, and because each of the actors are up to the task.

The film is set in a North African prison camp during World War II, where a group of five inmates (Connery, Ossie Davis, Roy Kinnear, Alfred Lynch and Jack Watson) have just been assigned. The Sergeant-Major who runs things at the camp (Harry Andrews) has a novel theory about rehabilitation -- break down the wills of the inmates by repeatedly running them up and down a sandy hill built in the middle of the compound, then rebuild them as model soldiers. Despite the martinet-type attitude, Connery and each of his fellow inmates begins to rebel against Andrews and his new, sadistic assistant (Ian Hendry), culminating in the death of one of the inmates and the consequent attempt to cover up the incident.

In black-and-white, Lumet has done a remarkable job of giving the location the feel of hell-on-earth, and his noted ability to work with actors is visible here. Connery is excellent in the second-best performance of his career (the best was his 1973 performance in "The Offence", also with Lumet directing) as a career soldier whose not all that certain that the Army's outdated discipline is worth anything. Equally good performances are turned in by Davis as a West Indian soldier who takes the racist barbs of his jailers and rebels in his own, unique way; Watson as a brutish inmate who begins to develop a conscience; Ian Bannen as a sympathetic guard; Lynch as a sensitive man not meant for the army or jail; Andrews; and Michael Redgrave as the ineffectual doctor who finds courage at the crucial moment.

Probably the best performance, however, is turned in by Hendry as the deeply insecure, sadistic loose cannon of a guard who truly sets events in motion. At once, his performance is villanous, but with an edge of immaturity that makes it almost difficult to hate him -- until the end when the other characters really begin to appreciate just how dangerous he is.

Unfortunately, this film was ignored by the Oscars -- a tragedy especially from some actors who have/had generally been ignored by the Academy and other awards groups (i.e., Connery, Hendry, Andrews, Davis). It did, however, win an award at the Cannes Film Festival for Ray Rigby's superb screenplay.

You may need to listen close to pick up some of the dialogue, but by all means, see it if you get the chance.

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British Square Stomping jackehammond
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What happened to the colorized version? QuestaVerde
DVD release in 2007 chris-2271
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