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1-20 of 22 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Elizabeth Taylor, Farley Granger, Jane Russell, Peter Falk, Sidney Lumet: TCM Remembers 2011

13 December 2011 4:16 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

"TCM Remembers 2011" is out. Remembered by Turner Classic Movies are many of those in the film world who left us this past year. As always, this latest "TCM Remembers" entry is a classy, immensely moving compilation. The haunting background song is "Before You Go," by Ok Sweetheart.

Among those featured in "TCM Remembers 2011" are Farley Granger, the star of Luchino Visconti's Senso and Alfred Hitchcock's Rope and Strangers on a Train; Oscar-nominated Australian actress Diane Cilento (Tom Jones, Hombre), formerly married to Sean Connery; and two-time Oscar nominee Peter Falk (Murder, Inc., Pocketful of Miracles, The Great Race), best remembered as television's Columbo. Or, for those into arthouse fare, for playing an angel in Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire.

Also, Jane Russell, whose cleavage and sensuous lips in Howard Hughes' The Outlaw left the puritans of the Production Code Association apoplectic; another Australian performer, Googie Withers, among »

- Andre Soares

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Peter Falk remembered by Gena Rowlands

10 December 2011 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

He was America's most famous TV detective Columbo… but he was also so much more, recalls Gena Rowlands

I first met Peter Falk in 1969 on the set of a film called Gli Intoccabili, which, for some reason, was released in America as Machine Gun McCain. It was what I call a "kind of good movie" and it was a lot of fun to make. We hit it off and became good friends, Peter, John [Cassavetes, Rowland's husband] and I. That was the beginning of a long, close and very creative friendship. A very special friendship.

Then John wrote for Peter, Ben Gazzara and himself. That led to A Woman Under the Influence, which came out in 1974. Peter was my husband and I was the woman having a breakdown. His character was under a lot of pressure, too, and he played that out so well. He was a mixed-up guy but a loving husband. »

- Gena Rowlands

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Peter Falk remembered by Gena Rowlands

10 December 2011 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

He was America's most famous TV detective Columbo… but he was also so much more, recalls Gena Rowlands

I first met Peter Falk in 1969 on the set of a film called Gli Intoccabili, which, for some reason, was released in America as Machine Gun McCain. It was what I call a "kind of good movie" and it was a lot of fun to make. We hit it off and became good friends, Peter, John [Cassavetes, Rowland's husband] and I. That was the beginning of a long, close and very creative friendship. A very special friendship.

Then John wrote for Peter, Ben Gazzara and himself. That led to A Woman Under the Influence, which came out in 1974. Peter was my husband and I was the woman having a breakdown. His character was under a lot of pressure, too, and he played that out so well. He was a mixed-up guy but a loving husband. »

- Gena Rowlands

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European Film Awards 2011: Nominations: Melancholia, The Artist, Le Havre

6 November 2011 7:25 AM, PST | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

Melancholia, The Artist, Le Havre and the other nominations for the 2011 European Film Awards have been announced. The 24th Annual European Film Awards are presented “by the European Film Academy to recognize excellence in European cinematic achievements. The awards are given in over ten categories of which the most important is the Film of the year. They are restricted to European cinema and European producers, directors, and actors.” This year’s European Film Awards “ceremony will be held on December 3, 2011 in Berlin’s Tempodrom near Potsdamer Platz.”

The full listing of the 2011 European Film Awards nominations is below.

European Film 2011

The Artist, France

Written and Directed by: Michel Hazanavicius; Produced by: Thomas Langmann & Emmanuel Montamat

Le Gamin au Velo (The Kid with a Bike), Belgium/France/Italy

Written and Directed by: Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne; Produced by: Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne, Denis Freyd & Andrea Occhipinti

Hævnen (In a Better World), Denmark »

- filmbook

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The Ultimate List of Films for Carmageddon!

14 July 2011 2:04 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Stay off the streets and stay in with a movie…that takes to the streets.

Los Angelenos are aflutter with impending chaos. And, if you don’t live in Los Angeles, you probably don’t understand. (I live here and I’m not sure I fully understand.) But this weekend (July 15-17), the City of Los Angeles has gotten it in its mind to shut down the 405 Freeway, one of the central lifelines for the (frankly absurd) amount of traffic that hits Los Angeles on a daily basis. This means that, functionally, no one’s going anywhere this weekend and the entire West side of Los Angeles is going to be choked off by the cold, unrelenting hands of the Los Angeles Dot.

Naturally, this has become a bit of a cultural meme (surely confusing anyone who doesn’t live in Los Angeles) dubbed by internet pun genii as “Carmageddon. »

- Danny

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Remember Me: Peter Falk (1927-2012)

26 June 2011 5:35 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It is to be expected that the obituaries and commemorations for Peter Falk, who passed away last Thursday, would center on his four-time Emmy-winning starring role in the long-running series Columbo (the character was first introduced in a 1968 TV movie, it was turned into an NBC series running 1971-1977, then ABC revived the brand in 1989 for 24 TV movies, the last airing in 2003). His role as the perennially rumpled, misleadingly bumbling, “Ahhh, just one more thing…” homicide detective was not only his most famous and memorable character, but one which achieved that rarified altitude of “iconic.” Think Falk; think Columbo.

And as deserving as the tributes are, as laudatory as the valedictories have been, they still don’t do justice to the range and power Falk demonstrated throughout his career as an actor on both large and small screen.

Even the laurels thrown on his work in Columbo focus on the visible elements, »

- Bill Mesce

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Peter Falk obituary

26 June 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work, »

- Brian Baxter

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Peter Falk obituary

26 June 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work, »

- Brian Baxter

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Peter Falk, 1927 - 2011

26 June 2011 2:23 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Updated through 6/26.

"Peter Falk, the stage and movie actor who became identified as the squinty, rumpled detective in Columbo, which spanned 30 years in primetime television and established one of the most iconic characters in police work, has died. He was 83." Anthony McCartney for the AP: "Falk made his film debut in 1958 with Wind Across the Everglades and established himself as a talented character actor with his performance as the vicious killer Abe Reles in Murder, Inc. Among his other movies: It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Robin and the Seven Hoods, The Great Race, Luv, Castle Keep, The Cheap Detective, The Brinks Job, The In-Laws, The Princess Bride. Falk also appeared in a number of art house favorites, including the semi-improvisational films Husbands and A Woman Under the Influence, directed by his friend John Cassavetes, and Wim Wenders's Wings of Desire, in which he played himself."

Last November, »

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R.I.P. Peter Falk

25 June 2011 1:18 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

The legendary raspy voiced Peter Falk has passed away at his home in Beverly Hills according to a family statement. He was 83 and had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Despite a rumpled appearance, a glass right eye and a quiet voice - Falk was also a fiercely compelling actor who handled dark drama and comedic farce with equal skill. Starting out on stage, he first got noticed for his work as a gangster in "Murder, Inc" and followed that with Frank Capra's last film "Pocketful of Miracles" - scoring Oscar nominations for both performances.

He also worked with John Cassavetes on both "Husbands" and "A Woman Under the Influence", played a closeted Raymond Chandler-inspired detective in the mystery spoof "Murder by Death", and had roles in "The Great Race," "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," "Vibes," "The In-Laws," "The Princess Bride, »

- Garth Franklin

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Remembering Peter Falk

25 June 2011 8:55 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Peter Falk, the iconic actor of stage, screen and television, died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 83 years old and had been battling Alzheimer's Disease. Falk created a legendary persona that served him well: that of the inarticulate street guy. He also had a physical abnormality that he made work to his advantage: since the age of 3, he had a glass eye. Despite the fact that he rode to success playing rough, street-wise characters, he was actually highly educated. He earned a master's degree and did not enter acting until the relatively late age of 29. He found almost immediate success and appeared in acclaimed New York stage productions of classic plays by Arthur Miller and Paddy Chayefsky, among others. Falk also found a welcome reception in Hollywood, often playing gangsters. He scored a Best Supporting Actor nomination of Murder, Inc in 1960 and would be »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Peter Falk Dead at 83: Columbo, A Woman Under The Influence

24 June 2011 6:50 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Peter Falk Peter Falk, the two-time Oscar nominee best known for playing television police detective Columbo, died Thursday, June 23, at his Beverly Hills home. Falk, who had been suffering from dementia (apparently a consequence of Alzheimer's disease), was 83. Falk's two Oscar nods, both in the Best Supporting Actor category, came back-to-back in the early '60s: as a cold-blooded hitman in Burt Balaban and Stuart Rosenberg's 1960 crime drama Murder, Inc., and as a typical Damon Runyon underworld character — named Joy Boy — in Frank Capra's dismal 1961 remake of his own Lady for a Day, Pocketful of Miracles. Among Falk's other notable film roles are those in two John Cassavetes movies: the very, very, very long 1970 drama Husbands, co-starring Ben Gazzara and Cassavetes himself, and the director' biggest box-office hit, the 1974 release A Woman Under the Influence, co-starring Gena Rowlands as the mentally unbalanced title character. In the film, which many consider Cassavetes' best work, »

- Andre Soares

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Peter Falk dies aged 83

24 June 2011 5:37 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor, who had been suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease, died at his Beverly Hills home

Peter Falk, the American actor famous for his role in the TV detective series Columbo, has died at the age of 83.

Falk died peacefully at his Beverly Hills home on Thursday evening, said a family friend, Larry Larson. Falk had reportedly been suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Perhaps one of Us television's most popular detectives, Falk won four Emmys for his starring role in Columbo, which ran from 1971 until 2003, and one for his role in the TV drama The Price of Tomatoes. He received Oscar nominations for Murder, Inc, his breakthrough film role, in 1960, and the comedy-drama Pocketful of Miracles, a year later. Falk also starred in the films The Princess Bride, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World; Robin and the Seven Hoods, The Great Race, and The Cheap Detective.

Born in »

- Amy Fallon

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Peter Falk, Columbo actor, dies aged 83

24 June 2011 5:37 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor, who had been suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease, died at his Beverly Hills home

Peter Falk, the American actor famous for his role in the TV detective series Columbo, has died at the age of 83.

Falk died peacefully at his Beverly Hills home on Thursday evening, said a family friend, Larry Larson. Falk had reportedly been suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Perhaps one of Us television's most popular detectives, Falk won four Emmys for his starring role in Columbo, which ran from 1971 until 2003, and one for his role in the TV drama The Price of Tomatoes. He received Oscar nominations for Murder, Inc, his breakthrough film role, in 1960, and the comedy-drama Pocketful of Miracles, a year later. Falk also starred in the films The Princess Bride, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World; Robin and the Seven Hoods, The Great Race, and The Cheap Detective.

Born in »

- Amy Fallon

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Peter Falk 1927-2011

24 June 2011 5:21 PM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

There's some sad news to report today as Peter Falk, TV's Columbo, has passed away at age 83. The actual cause of death has not been released, although it's known that Falk had suffered from Alzheimer's disease for the past few years. He was a talented actor who enjoyed success in both TV and film, earning multiple awards and nominations from each medium. Although Falk started in theater, he quickly transitioned into films, achieving back-to-back Best Supporting Actor nominations for Murder, Inc. and Pocketful of Miracles. From there he enjoyed steady work in films like The Great Race, Castle Keep, and Murder by Death. Falk was also known for his friendship with actor/director John Cassavetes and the two collaborated on more verité-style films like Husbands and A Woman Under the Influence. And then there was Columbo, the role Falk would be most associated with. He started playing the seemingly inept »

- Aaron

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Columbo Star Peter Falk Dead at 83

24 June 2011 1:10 PM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

TMZ.com is reporting that 83 year old Peter Falk, known best for his role in ‘Columbo’ died peacefully in his Beverly Hills home the evening of June 23, 2011. According to reports he had suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. Peter also starred in “Princess Bride”, “The Great Race” and “Brigadoon” and more recently as Father Randolph in 2009′s “American Cowslip” with co-stars Val Kilmer, Ronnie Gene Blevins, Diane Ladd, Cloris Leachman and Rip Torn. Peter’s remarkable career in film and television spanned over 50 years. Peter is survived by his wife, Shera and two daughters. “If your mind is at work, we’re in danger of reproducing another cliche. If we can »

- Brian Corder

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'Columbo' Star and Oscar Nominee Peter Falk Passes Away at Age 83

24 June 2011 11:25 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

While it's pretty much a cliché for detectives to adorn trench coats, fewer on-screen investigators wore the signature wardrobe as well as Peter Falk when he played iconic TV detective "Columbo." While the actor is better know for his work in television, he also leaves behind a legacy in film as TMZ reports Falk has sadly passed away at age 83.  In the last years of his life, the actor became plagued with dementia and tragically it has been said that he couldn't even remember his iconic role as Lieutenant Columbo on TV. Thankfully, audiences spanning generations will remember the actor through is many performances on TV and film. Aside from the aforementioned classic detective series, Falk also received two Academy Award nominations for the 1960 film Murder, Inc. and the 1961 film Pocketful of Miracles. In addition, the actor also appeared in films like Brigadoon, The Great Race, Wings of »

- Ethan Anderton

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News: Legendary ‘Columbo’ Actor Peter Falk Passes Away at 83

24 June 2011 11:07 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – He will surely be most-remembered for the trenchcoat-wearing eccentric detective “Columbo” but Peter Falk was a successful and underrated actor outside of the role that defined him. The great Falk passed away today at the age of 83 and the worlds of film and television will miss him greatly.

Born in New York City in 1927, Peter Falk made his first stage appearance at the age of 12. His glass eye (his was removed at the age of three due to a tumor) kept him out of World War II, but he wanted to serve and joined the Marines as a cook. After serving, he would work various jobs but found his love when he made his Broadway debut in 1956. 16 years later, he would win a Tony for his work on Broadway’s “The Prisoner of Second Avenue.”

Peter Falk

Photo credit: Getty Images

Of course, image-conscious Hollywood was hard for Peter Falk »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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10 greatest flying movies

21 June 2011 4:04 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From aerial bravery in Wwi to Tom Cruise in an F-14 Tomcat, Mark lists his top ten all-time favourite flying movies…

This is a personal list, and as such, won't please everyone. I accept that, but I wanted to look at the films that have best represented flying for me over the years.

I've also excluded helicopters in exchange for a festival of fixed wings. But as a person who loves aircraft and flying of all kinds, these are the ones that made me feel the need. The need for speed...

The Dam Busters (1955)

Gosh, what a place to start. For the most part, the film's an historically accurate retelling of the ultimate daring-do of WWII. Richard Todd plays the unflappable Guy Gibson, who lead the amazing 617 Squadron on their secret mission against the dams of the Ruhr valley.

Using the Barnes Wallis (played by Michael Redgrave) utterly inspired bouncing bomb, »

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The Forgotten: Wanda Cafe

19 May 2011 12:32 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The eighties could be looked upon as the era in which Hollywood composers did their best to murder cinema. Perhaps the preponderance of soundtracks assembled, Frankenstein-fashion, from fragments of the dead, was a sensible response to the mush promulgated by studio and indie musicians alike. Any romantic comedy of the decade is likely to sound like mellow porn. Thrillers thrum with synth scores dragged up as electro-orchestras, cheapness made audible. Once-greats like John Barry and Maurice Jarre pour soupy orchestrations over their films until they're submerged. Marvin Hamlisch and Bill Conti find regular work.

So Alan Rudolph's Trouble in Mind (1985) scores one miracle right off the bat: the dreamy jazz score provided by the underrated Mark Isham is languid without being soporific, romantic without being in the least schmaltzy, and of its time without being crap. The vocal presence of Marianne Faithfull gives it the final stamp of greatness. »

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