3.4/10
888
45 user 30 critic

Frankenstein Meets the Spacemonster (1965)

Unrated | | Horror, Sci-Fi | 22 September 1965 (USA)
When an atomic war on Mars destroys the planet's women, it's up to Martian Princess Marcuzan and her right-hand man Dr. Nadir to travel to earth and kidnap women for new breeding stock. ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Princess Marcuzan
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Dr. Adam Steele (as Jim Karen)
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Dr. Nadir
Nancy Marshall ...
Karen Grant
David Kerman ...
Gen. Bowers
Robert Reilly ...
Col. Frank Saunders / Frankenstein
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Storyline

When an atomic war on Mars destroys the planet's women, it's up to Martian Princess Marcuzan and her right-hand man Dr. Nadir to travel to earth and kidnap women for new breeding stock. Landing in Puerto Rico, they shoot down a NASA space capsule manned by an android. With his electronic brain damaged, the android terrorizes the island while the Martians raid beaches and pool parties. Written by Jeremy Lunt <durlinlunt@acadia.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Warning! Beware their stare!

Genres:

Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 September 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Operation Frankenstein  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In their book "Son of Golden Turkey Awards", Harry and Michael Medved award this film the Golden Turkey for "Most Ridiculously Inane Rock 'n' Roll Lyrics Used in a Motion Picture". (For "To Have and To Hold" by the Distant Cousins) See more »

Goofs

When the space monster is advancing during the end of the film, there's a brief shot of him from below where fluorescent lights may be seen in the ceiling. It's kind of hard to believe fluorescents would be present in a space ship of alien design. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. Nadir: We continue to hear modulated hydrogen frequency signal of 21 centimeters, Princess.
Princess Marcuzan: What does that mean?
Dr. Nadir: We're not quite certain, Princess. But it is definitely the same signal we have been following since we left our planet. The source of the signals is the planet that we are observing on the telescanner now. These transmissions indicate some intelligent life.
Princess Marcuzan: Let us move in for a closer look.
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Connections

Featured in Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

To Have and to Hold
by The Distant Cousins
Courtesy DVX Records,
A Bob Crewe Production
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User Reviews

 
Bad, certainly not boring
30 July 2006 | by (Worcester, MA) – See all my reviews

By any technical standards, this film is a mess on par with Ed Wood. But what a glorious mess it is! The film's imperfections create a camp classic, one whose reputation is certainly deserved. Despite the numerous shortcomings, I was never bored with this drive-in classic.

The film's plot is confusing, so I'll do my best to explain it. Mars invades Earth to capture voluptuous women for breeding purposes. The invasion force consists of around five aliens probably due to budget restraints. They land in Peurto Rico and destroy a NASA spaceship (which they believe is a missile). The spaceship crashes back on Earth, and an android escapes to terrorize the coast. Two NASA scientists and a general learn of this and do all they can to both halt the invasion and retrieve the android. Also, the Martians have a goofy-looking monster in tow who goes head to head with the android (hence the title).

There are several reasons why this is a camp classic. First and foremost, the acting is incredibly over-the-top. The heads of the invasion force are played wonderfully (by my definition) by the homunculus Lou Cutell and the absolutely gorgeous playboy playmate Marilyn Hanold. Their b-movie chemistry is very good, demonstrated by the memorable scene in which they decide whether the captive women are suitable or not. Robert Reilly plays the android Frank. His scenes at the press conference early on are priceless. Also, the obvious budget restraints elicit much laughter. In the press conference for the first voyage into space conducted by NASA, the panel consists of two scientists, a military general, and the android. The press is represented by about four reporters. Also, the Martian spaceship appears to be much bigger on the inside than the outside. The two songs played repeatedly on the soundtrack are "groovy" pop-garage numbers that you'll forget as soon as the film is done. For all its shortcomings, it is actually quickly paced and contains much of what we love in flicks like this. (3/10)


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