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Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Approved | | Drama, Romance, War | 31 December 1965 (USA)
The life of a Russian physician and poet who, although married to another, falls in love with a political activist's wife and experiences hardship during the First World War and then the October Revolution.

Director:

Writers:

(novel) (as Boris Leonidovic Pasternak), (screenplay)
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1,783 ( 1,075)

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Won 5 Oscars. Another 16 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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The Girl
Jeffrey Rockland ...
Tarek Sharif ...
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The Bolshevik
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Kostoyed
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Liberius (as Gerard Tichy)
Noel Willman ...
Razin
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Storyline

During the Russian Revolution, Yuri Zhivago, is a young doctor who has been raised by his aunt and uncle following his father's suicide. Yuri falls in love with beautiful Lara Guishar, who has been having an affair with her mother's lover, Victor Komarovsky, an unscrupulous businessman. Yuri, however, ends up marrying his cousin, Tonya. But when he and Lara meet again years later, the spark of love reignites. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In a world of guns and ice there is the great noise of battle and the greater silence of lovers See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

31 December 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Doktor Živago  »

Box Office

Budget:

$11,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$111,722,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1999 re-release) | (1992 re-release)

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System) (5.0) (L-R)

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Igor Girkin, the leader of the Russian-backed rebels in Eastern Ukraine who was complicit in shooting down the Malaysian commercial airplane in 2014, adopted the nom de guerre of Strelkov after Pasha, the ruthless character played by Tom Courtney. See more »

Goofs

Lean obviously tried very hard to recreate accurately the period of the story. Unfortunately he commits a mistake very common in historical movies from since the Silent Era: the women wear hair and makeup that is not right for the movie's historical era, but which belongs instead to the mid 1960s, the time the movie was made. See more »

Quotes

Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: [Zhivago is trying to aide a wounded White soldier] It does not matter!
Zhivago: Have you ever loved a woman, Razin?
Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: I once had a wife and four children.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Dancing with the Stars: Episode #9.7 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Prelude in G minor, Op.23-5
(1901) (uncredited)
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

One of the Best Epic Films Ever Made
7 March 2003 | by (Flagstaff, AZ) – See all my reviews

I can't remember the origin of the quote, but I remember it distinctly. A Communist Party official of the Soviet Union, justifying the Bolshevik destruction of Tsarist Russia, told a foreign observer, `If you want to make an omelet, you've got to break some eggs.' The visitor replied, `I see the broken eggs, but Where's the omelet?' Dr. Zhivago is set at the time when the Bolsheviks, feverishly ideological, were creating their socialist state. The epochal drama that unfolds is the age-old question about whether the ends justify the means.

As materialists (matter precedes spirit, not vice versa), the Bolsheviks believed that they had found the holy grail of human progress in Marxism-Leninism, and were now able to assume the reins of history in their own hands. They believed that their violence was not only justified, but necessary, oblivious to the fact that they, too, somehow felt the angel of medieval teleology smiling over their shoulders.

In contrast to the Bolsheviks, Zhivago's ethos, if he had one, was almost identical to Kant's `categorical imperative,' which had just one axiom: treat people as ends in themselves, and not as ends to a mean. There couldn't be a sharper moral contrast.

There's a fabulous scene midway through the movie that highlights the difference in moral attitude. Dr. Zhivago confronts a communist functionary who has ordered the destruction of a village, a hamlet suspected of aiding the Mensheviks by selling them horses. To the Bolsheviks, if you weren't 100 percent behind them, you were a `counterrevolutionary,' sorta like Dubya's idea that you're either for us, or against us. And so Strelnikov, the passionate Bolshevik, glibly justifies his actions to Dr. Zhivago as easy as if he were tossing his hair aside, saying that the annihilation of the village, however cruel, is necessary to make a point. Zhivago replies: `Your point; their village.'

I love this film, a timeless epic. If there's a more beautiful heroine in all of movie-making history than Julie Christie (Lara), I'm not aware of it. And Omar Sharif is stunning as Iuri Zhivago, who heals the body with emetics, scalpels, antiseptic, and gauze, while he heals the soul with his poetry. Although the movie is three hours and 20 minutes long, the cinematography is so efficient, evocative, and densely layered that one hardly notices. This is, in my opinion, one of the best films of all time.


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