Edit
The Cincinnati Kid (1965) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (2)
Spencer Tracy was originally cast as Lancey Howard but poor health forced him to withdraw and he was replaced by Edward G. Robinson.
Steve McQueen was widely felt to be too old for his character.
There had been talk about Cary Grant taking the role of Lancey Howard, although it is unlikely that Grant would have conceded first billing to Steve McQueen.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sharon Tate was replaced in the film by Tuesday Weld after Sam Peckinpah was fired by producer Martin Ransohoff.
Director Sam Peckinpah insisted on changing an early expository scene in which a girl in her underwear is massaged with a vibrator. He removed the vibrator from the scene altogether and had the girl lie naked but completely covered with a fur coat. Producer Martin Ransohoff was unhappy with the shift in tone and fired Peckinpah.
Mitzi Gaynor campaigned for the role of "Lady Fingers", but it ended up going to Joan Blondell. Rumors are abound as to why Blondell got the role, with the most common being that Gaynor and Ann-Margret did not quite get along.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Edward G. Robinson wrote in his autobiography, "In the film I played Lancey Howard, the reigning champ of the stud poker tables...I could hardly say I identified with Lancey; I was Lancey. That man on the screen, more than in any other picture I ever made, was Edward G. Robinson with great patches of Emanuel Goldenberg [his real name] showing through. He was all cold and discerning and unflappable on the exterior; he was ageing and full of self-doubt on the inside....Even the final session of the poker game was real...I played that game as if it were for blood. It was one of the best performances I ever gave on stage or screen or radio or TV, and the reason for it is that is wasn't a performance at all; it was symbolically the playing out of my whole gamble with life."
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The cockfight scene was cut by British censors.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In some cuts, the film ends with a freeze-frame on Steve McQueen's face following his penny-pitching loss. Turner Classic Movies and the DVD feature the ending with Christian. Norman Jewison wanted to end the film with the freeze-frame but was overruled by the producer.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The book's setting was changed from St. Louis, Missouri to New Orleans, Louisiana.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The rather gratuitous fight scene in the film was added at the instigation of Steve McQueen who had it written into his contract that he feature in an action scene.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Edward G. Robinson said of Steve McQueen, "He comes out of the tradition of Gable, Bogie, Cagney, and even me-but he's added his own dimension. He is a stunner..."
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Steve McQueen was first told that Paddy Chayefsky was writing the script, he reportedly said, "Tell Paddy when he's writing that I'm much better walking than I am talking."
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Strother Martin claimed he was cast in the film but got fired after Norman Jewison replaced Sam Peckinpah.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Final film of Harry Wilson.
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Paddy Chayefsky was originally signed to write the screenplay.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This was Ring Lardner Jr.'s first major studio work since his 1947 blacklisting as one of The Hollywood Ten.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Edward G. Robinson and Joan Blondell had previously worked together on Bullets or Ballots (1936).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

According to an article written by Michael Wiesenberg of Card Player Magazine, "[t]he odds of the two hands appearing in the same deal [in the climactic scene] are worse than 45 million-to-1."
This is the second movie in which Edward G. Robinson plays a gambler that features a straight flush in diamonds. Smart Money (1931) has the final credits superimposed over this hand, which is also the final hand in this movie.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page