La battaglia di Algeri
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The Battle of Algiers (1966) More at IMDbPro »La battaglia di Algeri (original title)


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

9 items from 2017


Christopher Nolan Curates BFI Series on the Influences of ‘Dunkirk’

25 May 2017 5:09 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“I spent a lot of time reviewing the silent films for crowd scenes –the way extras move, evolve, how the space is staged and how the cameras capture it, the views used,” Nolan said earlier this year when it came to the creation of his WWII epic Dunkirk, referencing films such as IntoleranceSunrise: A Song of Two Humans, and Greed, as well as the films of Robert Bresson.

Throughout the entire month of July, if you’re in the U.K., you are lucky enough to witness a selection of these influences in a program at BFI Southbank. Featuring all screenings in 35mm or 70mm — including a preview of Dunkirk over a week before it hits theaters — there’s classics such as Greed, Sunrise, and The Wages of Fear, as well as Alien, Speed, and even Tony Scott’s final film.

Check out Nolan’s introduction below, followed by »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk To Play At BFI Southbank On July 13

24 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Running from 1-31 July, BFI Southbank are delighted to present a season of films which have inspired director Christopher Nolan’s new feature Dunkirk (2017), released in cinemas across the UK on Friday 21 July.

Christopher Nolan Presents has been personally curated by the award-winning director and will offer audiences unique insight into the films which influenced his hotly anticipated take on one of the key moments of WWII.

The season will include a special preview screening of Dunkirk on Thursday 13 July, which will be presented in 70mm and include an introduction from the director himself.

Christopher Nolan is a passionate advocate for the importance of seeing films projected on film, and as one of the few cinemas in the UK that still shows a vast amount of celluloid film, BFI Southbank will screen all the films in the season on 35mm or 70mm.

In 2015 Nolan appeared on stage alongside visual artist »

- Michelle Hannett

Permalink | Report a problem


The Day of the Jackal

29 April 2017 11:14 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

One of the best international thrillers ever has almost become an obscurity, for reasons unknown – this Blu-ray comes from Australia. Edward Fox’s wily assassin for hire goes up against the combined police and security establishments of three nations as he sets up the killing of a head of state – France’s president Charles de Gaulle. The terrific cast features Michel Lonsdale, Delphine Seyrig and Cyril Cusack; director Fred Zinnemann’s excellent direction reaches a high pitch of tension – even though the outcome is known from the start.

The Day of the Jackal

Region B+A Blu-ray

Shock Entertainment / Universal

1973 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 143 min. / Street Date ? / Available from Amazon UK / Pounds 19.99

Starring: Edward Fox, Michel Lonsdale, Delphine Seyrig, Cyril Cusack, Eric Porter, Tony Britton, Alan Badel, Michel Auclair, Tony Britton, Maurice Denham, Vernon Dobtcheff, Olga Georges-Picot, Timothy West, Derek Jacobi, Jean Martin, Ronald Pickup, Jean Sorel, Philippe Léotard, Jean Champion, »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


John Ridley on 'Guerrilla,' Black Activism, Resisting Trump

14 April 2017 8:27 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Through a combinationof crazy prolificacy and an accident of timing, John Ridley's name is behind somany hours of television this month that he could program an entire network forthe better part of a day. As it stands, three different Ridley projects willoverlap by the end of April, each a testament to his interest in social justiceand upheaval, from contemporary labor and immigration problems in NorthCarolina to racial upheaval and violence in the early 1970s England and early 1990sLos Angeles. Though Ridley has been working steadily on TV and film for twodecades, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Shout Select Fights Russians, Crips, and Bloods With ‘Red Dawn’ and ‘Colors’

17 March 2017 12:02 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

We take a look at new Blu-rays of two ’80s classics.

Shout! Factory’s relatively young collectors label, Shout Select, is something of an odd duck. This is less of a criticism than an observation as their releases so far bear no real discernible through line. We’ve gotten well-deserved Blu-rays of eagerly awaited ’80s classics like To Live and Die in La, Road House, and Midnight Run, but the label has also released/announced titles like Death of a Salesman, The Chinese Connection, and Simon Pegg’s forgettable 2012 film, A Fantastic Fear of Everything. So yeah, there’s something of an odd inconsistency across the catalog.

For now though we’re here to discuss their latest releases, two ’80s films of varying acclaim and renown — John MiliusRed Dawn and Dennis Hopper’s Colors.

Red Dawn (1984)

A small town in Colorado begins its day like any other until strangers drop from the sky. Soviet »

- Rob Hunter

Permalink | Report a problem


Top Five Films That Influenced Change

24 February 2017 2:52 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

I Daniel Blake

Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake (releasing on DVD and Blu-ray 27th February) lays bare the cruel realities for those who fall through the cracks of society. With the film resulting in much topical debate, we take a look at five films that have influenced change following its release to screen:      

Alfie

In the 1966 original (not the remake), Julia Foster’s character Gilda undergoes a harrowing abortion – carried out in a back room in Alfie’s (Michael Caine) flat. At the time, abortion was illegal in the UK, and the procedure is seen to be carried out by a “back-street” abortionist.

“Backstreet abortions” were outlawed in the UK with the introduction of the 1967 Abortion Act. Although not openly stated, Alfie’s conscience when he saw the results of a botched operation is arguably a contributor to this, as – coincidentally – the film released months before the law began to change. »

- The Hollywood News

Permalink | Report a problem


New to Streaming: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Allied,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Doctor Strange,’ and More

17 February 2017 10:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Rushes. Tiger Awards, Sofia Coppola's "The Beguiled," Whitney's Biennial, Debating "La La Land"

8 February 2017 1:47 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSSexy DurgaThe Hivos Tiger Awards of the International Film Festival Rotterdam have been announced, with Sanal Kumar Sasidharan's Sexy Durga taking home the Tiger, Niles Atallah's Rey winning the Special Jury Award, and Caroline Leone's Pela janela being picked by Fipresci.New York's Whitney Museum has revealed its full film program for the 2017 Biennial, with a focus on such filmmakers as Mary Helena Clark, James N. Kienitz Wilkins, Kevin Jerome Everson, Eric Baudelaire and Robert Beavers.Recommended VIEWINGThe eagerly awaited trailer for Sofia Coppola's new film, a remake of Don Siegel's bizarre and wonderful The Beguiled, with Colin Farrell in Clint Eastwood's role.The glorious full trailer for James Gray's Amazonia exploration melodrama, The Lost City of Z."The screen is a neutral element in the film-going experience. Or is it? It projects dreams »

Permalink | Report a problem


How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

4 January 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it »

- Carson Blackwelder

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

9 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners