A long-running British TV series starring Alfred Burke as dour private-eye Frank Marker. Cynical and world-weary, Marker is frequently the unwitting stooge in bigger criminal wheels in his ... See full summary »
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1975   1973   1972   1971   1969   1968   … See all »
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Alfred Burke ...
 Frank Marker (87 episodes, 1965-1975)
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Storyline

A long-running British TV series starring Alfred Burke as dour private-eye Frank Marker. Cynical and world-weary, Marker is frequently the unwitting stooge in bigger criminal wheels in his attempts to make a tenuous living on the outskirts of London. Fairly cheaply made on video, when the series went into colour in 1970, rather than re-making the evocative title sequence, the producers (Thames Television) merely put it through a sepia filter! Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

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Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Release Date:

23 January 1965 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Detective público  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(87 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Frank is given a display case of 15 pinned butterflies by a grateful client as part-payment for his fee. He has this in his Birmingham office and takes it to his short-lived Brighton premises. It then hangs in his Windsor home (as seen in "The Beater and the Game") before being displayed in his High Street office in "John VII. Verse 24". A nice piece of visual continuity, the box does actually differ slightly between the ABC and Thames episodes. See more »

Goofs

The Golden Flower Chinese restaurant is visible through the window of Frank's Eton High Street office - but as seen in location work for editions such as "Come Into the Garden, Rose", the eaterie is actually found two doors down from Marker's premises. The Thames production team designed the studio backdrop like this as they felt what actually faced the office was visually uninteresting. See more »

Connections

Spin-off Armchair Theatre: Wednesday's Child (1970) See more »

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User Reviews

Fine downbeat series
11 February 2005 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Public Eye was a fine series and deserves a place in the British TV Hall of Fame. It's a shame it's not shown regularly on terrestrial TV, but I'm glad to see it's now available on DVD.

It was part of Alfred Burke's brilliance in the part that Frank Marker was a character with no real character traits. We knew nothing about his background, a mystery which was never solved for us by the writers. Originally, the character of Marker was going to be a tough, Lee Marvin figure, but casting Burke was an inspired move on the part of the producers. With his lined, seen-it-all face and his sensitive, laconic manner, Burke rooted the concept firmly in reality. Marker dealt with the dark, petty underbelly of the world, and was only ever a few pounds short of bankruptcy. It seemed only natural that one day he would be arrested (framed for handling stolen goods) and go to prison (ending the original ABC TV series). When he emerged some time later (Thames TV taking over production), Marker has quit Birmingham for seedy Brighton for a masterly 1969 series entirely penned by Roger Marshall. Here, Marker is dealing as much with the repercussions of his own lonely, solitary character as he is with the shadow of prison. Later (with the advent of colour TV), the character moved from there to the more upmarket locale of Windsor, where for a time he became partners with the sharp, ambitious alpha-male Ron Gash.

Marker always eschewed the term "detective" in his dealings with clients, preferring the term that real British private eyes use, "enquiry agent"; at a stroke, this narrative move cut Public Eye off from all other detective series and encouraged a more downbeat approach. In this, it followed its source: Anthony Marriott was a real-life enquiry agent whose techniques and experiences were the basis of the show. A movie made from the material might have been a British classic.

One other point: the haunting bluesy theme for some reason is rarely mentioned, was never released on record, and is not credited on IMDb.com. It is by veteran TV bandleader Bob Sharples (under the pseudonym Robert Earley).


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