A long-running British TV series starring Alfred Burke as dour private-eye Frank Marker. Cynical and world-weary, Marker is frequently the unwitting stooge in bigger criminal wheels in his ... See full summary »
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7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1975   1973   1972   1971   1969   1968   … See all »
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Alfred Burke ...
 Frank Marker (87 episodes, 1965-1975)
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Storyline

A long-running British TV series starring Alfred Burke as dour private-eye Frank Marker. Cynical and world-weary, Marker is frequently the unwitting stooge in bigger criminal wheels in his attempts to make a tenuous living on the outskirts of London. Fairly cheaply made on video, when the series went into colour in 1970, rather than re-making the evocative title sequence, the producers (Thames Television) merely put it through a sepia filter! Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Release Date:

23 January 1965 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Detective público  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(87 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

First seen in "Well - There Was This Girl, You See...", the framed artwork given to Frank by Nell Holdsworth which decorates his offices thereafter, is an 1823 representation by John George Murray (after James Stephanoff), of 'The Trial of Queen Caroline', when the Pains and Penalties Bill 1820 was pushed through and passed in the House of Lords at the bequest of King George IV in an attempt to discredit his estranged wife. Its title is fully "View of the interior of the House of Lords, during the important investigation in 1820." See more »

Goofs

At the start of the second season, Marker moves into new premises in Birmingham which overlook Kane's Timber Yard. Despite the busy sound effects added by the production team to convey the atmosphere of a hectic workplace, the view from his office window regularly depicts the same selection of long-untouched wooden planks, since the scene is a stationary backdrop. By the following series Kane's have been taken over and presumably demolished, as a view of tower blocks has replaced the yard. See more »

Connections

Spin-off Armchair Theatre: Wednesday's Child (1970) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Outstanding television drama
28 September 2006 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

These series in my opinion are British television at its very finest, centred around a marvellous sustained performance by Alfred Burke which stands comparison with anything to be seen anywhere in film, TV or theatre; and scripts of high intelligence, firmly grounded in the downbeat experiences of everyday English life, yet psychologically profound.

The support acting rises to the occasion too, in all the episodes I have seen - Pauline Delaney's performance in Series 4 for example.

By all accounts the show was widely popular when originally broadcast, and it is a mystery to this viewer why repeat broadcasts are so very seldom seen.


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